Fast-acting coworkers with an AED save employee’s life

Irv Donaldson pictured right

Irv Donaldson had a heart attack at work.

What his fellow employees did next saved his life.

Meanwhile, employee Jeff Wilson went and grabbed an AED, or an Automated External Defibrillator. The coworkers then used the device to shock Donaldson’s heart. Those quick actions all happened in about 7 minutes before paramedics arrived.

Paramedics say what they did helped save Donaldson’s life.

Source:kwwl

 

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This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

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Athletic trainer saves man’s life at baseball game

 

Joe Boyd was enjoying a night of baseball cheering on the Hornets. Joe attends nearly every home game.

Suddenly out of nowhere, “Joe just fell backwards.” Says Leigh Hines, whose husband Cody Hines is a coach for the district.

The districts head athletic trainer Jose Mendez heard Lehigh say “I think he’s having a heart attack”.

Mendez grabbed the AED and rushed up the bleachers from the dugout.

At this point Joe Boyd was unconscious and not breathing.

Mendez opened the lid of the AED to attached the pads, to which a shock was advised. Following the shock, Mendez administered CPR and Boyd was revived.

 

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Source: Athens Daily Review


Man’s life saved by Florida lifeguards after cardiac arrest

In 2015, the then 40 year old Jacksonville Beach resident, J.R. Bourne went in cardiac arrest.

He was playing soccer with his friend Luis when he suddenly collapsed and stopped breathing.

While a bystander began CPR, and someone called 911, the Jacksonville Beach Ocean Rescue truck were nearby.

“We were driving down the beach at 10 a.m., putting our lifeguards out on towers, when we heard screams for help,” said lifeguard Gordon VanDusen, one of the first responders. The lifeguards are certified in CPR and AED, and had just completed refresher training.

The lifeguards soon took over and using the AED shocked Bournes heart back to a normal rhythm. The lifeguards continued CPR until an ambulance arrived.

More than 350,000 people in the U.S. experience a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital each year. Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions, causing the heart to abruptly stop. Unless CPR is performed and an AED is used to shock the heart, death can occur within minutes.

  • Bystanders used an AED in 18.8% of these cases.1
  • Cardiac arrest victims who received a shock from a publicly-available AED had far greater chances of survival and being discharged from the hospital than those who did not; 66.5% versus 43%.2
  • Cardiac arrest victims who received a shock from a publicly-available AED that was administered by a bystander had 2.62 times higher odds of survival to hospital discharge and 2.73 times more favorable outcomes for functioning compared to victims who first received an AED shock after emergency responders arrived.3
  • Victims who received an AED shock from a bystander (57.1%) using a publicly-available device instead of having to wait for emergency responders (32.7%) had near normal function and better outcomes.4
  • Without a bystander using AED shock therapy, 70% of cardiac arrest patients either died or survived with impaired brain function.5

 

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Source: Medical Xpress

  1. https://unifirstfirstaidandsafety.com/cardiac-arrest-survival-increase-when-bystanders-use-an-aed/
  2. https://unifirstfirstaidandsafety.com/cardiac-arrest-survival-increase-when-bystanders-use-an-aed/
  3. https://unifirstfirstaidandsafety.com/cardiac-arrest-survival-increase-when-bystanders-use-an-aed/
  4. https://unifirstfirstaidandsafety.com/cardiac-arrest-survival-increase-when-bystanders-use-an-aed/
  5. https://unifirstfirstaidandsafety.com/cardiac-arrest-survival-increase-when-bystanders-use-an-aed/

High school student who suffers cardiac arrest during gym class

Samuel Mazzeo stand out in the crowd. At 6-foot-5, the high school student played football, basketball and was on the weightlifting team.

On February, 23, the unforeseen occurred. Samuel went into cardiac arrest during gym class.

“I don’t remember that day at all. They told me I was running around like normal and I sat down because I wasn’t feeling good. And then I passed out and was unresponsive,” Mazzeo said.

Wendy Rogers, his physical education teacher rushed to Samuel and couldn’t find a pulse.

Rogers call the school nurse Amy Ponce.

“There was no time for us to be nervous or anxious. We had to do what needed to be She did CPR, while Secretary Hannah Hall brought the AED device and delivered a life saving electric shock to Mazzeo’s heart.

Assistant Principal Tim Light continued chest compressions.done,” Ponce said.

Thanks to this dream team of everyday school employees, Mazzeo regained consciousness and got to the hospital just in time.

“When I think about it, it’s crazy, I actually died. I never thought anything like that would ever happen,” said Mazzeo.

Mazzeo who was diagnosed with a heart ailment called ARVD, now has a pacemaker and defibrillator.

Source: ABC Action News WFTS Tampa Bay

 

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Middle school educators save man’s life during heart attack

Neil Carew a longtime photographer, was in the school gym when he suffered a heart attack.

”When I turned around, he went down at that moment,” said coach and teacher Cathy Egger. “I went and shook him and called out his name a little bit and I said, ‘This isn’t working.’”

Egger then went to get help. She called our for Denis Minks Who was close by.

After calling 911, Principal Clay Hudgins ran into the gym with the AED the school had right outside of the gym

Longtime nurse Katrina Kalhleffel took the lead, opening the AED and placing the patches from the device onto Carew’s chest.

The AED advised that a shock was necessary. It then proceeded to shock twice before continuing with CPR.

“I don’t think he would’ve made it, possibly not even to the hospital. He certainly would not have left the hospital functioning as he is,” said Carew’s doctor Nils Johnson with Memorial Hermann. “When the heart stops, all of the organs in the body suffer. They don’t get the blood flow that they need. On average, less than 10 percent of people like him make it to leave the hospital with a meaningful mental status, that is, a meaningful mental recovery after this.”

Source: ABC 13 Wallis, TX


Cardiac arrest survival increase when bystanders use an AED

According to a recent study in the Circulation Journal Report, Survival from cardiac arrest doubled when bystanders stepped in to use a publicly available automated external defibrillator rather than waiting for emergency responders to arrive.

The study showed that the longer it takes to emergency personnel to arrive, the greater the benefit of a bystander using an AED to shock the victim.

Victims who received a defibrillator shock from a bystander had far greater chances at survival and being discharged from the hospital than those that did not.

  • Bystanders used an AED in 18.8% of these cases.
  • Cardiac arrest victims who received a shock from a publicly-available AED had far greater chances of survival and being discharged from the hospital than those who did not; 66.5% versus 43%.
  • Cardiac arrest victims who received a shock from a publicly-available AED that was administered by a bystander had 2.62 times higher odds of survival to hospital discharge and 2.73 times more favorable outcomes for functioning compared to victims who first received an AED shock after emergency responders arrived.
  • Victims who received an AED shock from a bystander (57.1%) using a publicly-available device instead of having to wait for emergency responders (32.7%) had near normal function and better outcomes.
  • Without a bystander using AED shock therapy, 70% of cardiac arrest patients either died or survived with impaired brain function.

To learn more about CPR and AED’s contact your UniFirst First Aid + Safety representative for more information.


Woman who collapsed in Publix restroom saved with CPR

Renee Gold (Pictured left) and Kamilla Soares (right). Photo courtesy of myPalmBeachPost

Kamilla Soares, who recently became a paramedic was next door to Publix when she received an alert on her phone that someone needed CPR.

Kamilla, and a Publix Customer Service Manager Renee Gold performed life saving CPR.

Renee Gold found the woman in the bathroom stall.

“I had to pull her out from underneath. I had 911 on the phone, and they were telling me to check, ‘Was she breathing?’” Gold said. “She was gasping for air.”

Gold began doing CPR when Soares arrived. Together with the help of 9-1-1 dispatcher they performed CPR until Palm Beach Gardens Fire and Rescue arrived.

The woman was later released form the hospital.

”You guys definitely went above and beyond,” said Cory Bessette, Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue Division Chief of EMS. “Whether you’re medically trained or not, you can do CPR.”

Source: myPalmBeachPost


Starbucks barista performs CPR

Natasha Stapp, a barista at Starbucks stepped forward to perform CPR on a stranger when Chris Smith collapsed on the sidewalk out front of the store.

“One of the things that I love the most is being able to change somebody’s day,” Stapp said

Chris Smith suffered what is nicknamed the Widowmaker Heart Attack. It is a heart problem so deadly, that only about 5% of individuals with it survive. They Widowmaker is when 95% or more blockage occurs in the main artery that supplies the front wall of the heart. If left untreated, it causes the entire firing wall of the heart to die.

Thanks to Natasha’s actions and the help of the 9-1-1 operator, Chris Smith is alive to today.

“The details seem kind of homely, but my wife and I were able to celebrate a 52nd wedding anniversary and I watched two of our grandkids graduate. None of that would have happened if Natasha wouldn’t have been there. Without her CPR work, there wouldn’t have been anything for the paramedics to revive,” said Smith.

Source: Kens5


Teen’s quick acting saves life with CPR

Nineteen year old Hannah Evans was at home getting ready to leave for work. When she looked outside and saw family friend Becky Garverick, who had been helping Hannah’s parents cut their lawn. Suddenly Hannah saw Becky collapse to the ground.

Hannah rushed out to the yard and checked for a pulse and immediately began chest compressions. She called 911 and continued with chest compressions.

“At one point while doing CPR, I lost Becky’s pulse. But I just kept going,” she explained.

Hannah is a nursing student at NC State in Mansfield. She learned CPR while attending Pioneer Career and Technology Center as a medical technology student.

Hannah had never performed CPR on an actual person until that day, and if she hadn’t been trained to do so, Becky Garverick knows she would not be here today.

Source: Galion Inquirer