National Work Zone Safety Week – Helpful facts and tips

This week is designated National Work Zone Awareness Week. This week is designed to bring attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones. What is your company doing to raise awareness?

  • Drivers are the most frequent fatality in work zone crashes.
  • Most work zone fatalities involve working-age adults.
  • Rear-end crashes (running into the rear of a slowing or stopping vehicle) are the most common type of work zone crash.
  • Fatal work zone crashes occur most often in summer and fall.
  • The majority of fatal work zone crashes occurred on roads with speed limits greater than 50 mph.
  • Stopping distance for motor vehicles at 50 mph:

                   -Dry roadway300 ft

                   -Wet roadway400 ft

                   -Icy pavement1250 ft

  • A loaded 80,000 lb. tractor-trailer requires almost 50% more stopping distance.
  • It takes only an extra 25 seconds to cover 1 mile at 45 mph compared to 65 mph.

Tips for the Driver

  • Stay Alert and Minimize Distractions
  • Keep Your Headlights On
  • Pay Attention to the Road
  • Merge into the Proper Lane
  • Don’t Tailgate
  • Obey the Posted Speed Limit
  • Change Lanes Safely
  • Follow Instructions form Flaggers
  • Expect the Unexpected

BE PATIENT

Additional resources

FHWA-Developed Resources PDF

Trucking Safely Through Work Zones PDF

 

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Pet First Aid Month – What You Need To Know…

With April being Pet First Aid Awareness month, below we list of a number of quick tips. This list is meant as intermediary steps. You should also consult a veterinarian.

Pet First Aid

Do you know what to do during a pet emergency? Here are some common emergency tips:

  • If your cat or dog is dehydrated, pull up on the skin between the shoulder blades. It should spring right back; if it stays tented this is a sign of dehydration.
  • Signs of pet poisoning include bleeding externally or internally, dilated pupils, drooling or foaming at the mouth, seizures or other abnormal mental state or behavior. If suspect your pet has been poisoned, contact Animal Poison Control 888-426-4435
  • Signs of heatstroke or heat exhaustion include collapse; body temperature of 104 degrees F or above; bloody diarrhea or vomiting; wobbliness; excessive panting or difficulty breathing; increase heart rate; mucous membranes very red; and increased salivation.
  • Pets bitten by other animals need vet attention to prevent the wound (even if minor) from becoming infected and to check for internal wounds. You should never break up a dogfight yourself because you could be bitten.
  • If your pet is bleeding, apply direct pressure using gauze over the bleeding site. If blood soaks through, apply more gauze (do not removed soaked gauze) until you can reach a veterinary hospital.
  • If your pet has a seizure, make sure it is in a safe place, but do not restrain the animal. Keep your hands away from its mouth as your pet may not know who you are during a seizure and could bite you.
  • Know where to go in case of an emergency. Your regular veterinarian is a great place if the emergency occurs during the day. If the emergency occurs in the evening or on weekends it may be necessary to go to the emergency clinic in your area. Most are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Ensure important phone numbers such as your veterinarian, emergency vet hospitals, or emergency contacts are easily accessible.
  • Pack a pet first aid kit. It is best if you can have one for her car, and one for at home use. Fill it not only with useful supplies, but also keep a copy of your pet’s medical records with your pets name, age, breed microchip number, vaccine history, and any pre-existing conditions.

This last point is especially helpful if you regularly use a pet sitter or babysitter and will ensure that this person will have all they need should an emergency arise.

 

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Why Employees Need First Aid Training

 

Whether the workplace is an office or a construction site, it has two common traits — valuable employees who may be injured or become ill and the need to protect them with adequate first aid procedures.

The good health and resulting productivity of employees is one area that is often overlooked as a means of improving a company’s profitability. The size of this opportunity is indicated by a National Safety Council estimate that in 1997, there were more than 80 million lost workdays due to unintentional injuries. The astounding cost to American businesses was $127 billion, or an average of $980 per worker.

Whether employees work in a high-hazard or low-hazard environment, they face a variety of risks. Shock, bleeding, poisonings, burns, temperature extremes, musculoskeletal injuries, bites and stings, medical emergencies, and distressed employees in confined spaces are just a sampling of the first aid emergencies which might be encountered in your business. These risks are compounded when employees don’t feel well. Their lack of concentration can result in costly injuries.

If your employees aren’t prepared to handle these types of injuries on all shifts and their coworkers are left untreated until an ambulance arrives, a victim’s condition may worsen and injuries can become far more debilitating, which leads to greater medical costs and lost productivity.

It makes good business sense to provide first aid and appropriate training to all your employees. By making such a minimal investment in keeping your employees safe and well-trained, you could net big returns, along with a competitive advantage. Moreover, it’s the law.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires businesses to provide first aid and CPR training to employees in the absence of a nearby clinic or hospital. While safety always begins with prevention, not every work-related injury can be prevented. Your primary first aid training goal should be to give employees the necessary tools and information they need to care for an ill or injured person, if necessary until advanced help arrives.

“The outcome of occupational injuries depends not only on the severity of the injury but also on the rendering of first aid care,” writes OSHA in its 1991 Guidelines for Basic First Aid Training Programs. “Prompt, properly administered first aid care can mean the difference between life and death, rapid vs. prolonged recovery, and temporary vs. permanent disability.” Since each site is so different, OSHA requires first aid training to be specific to the needs of the workplace. Proper training varies with the industry, number of employees, and proximity to emergency care.

Although OSHA’s 1991 guidelines specify the requirements for a first aid program, OSHA does not teach or certify programs. Therefore, employers are faced with numerous programs to choose from, and the choice can be difficult. Because of this, a consensus group comprised of a panel of government and private experts developed the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings in 1997.

This new and detailed curriculum identifies the skill training that makes a workplace first aid responder competent to provide care. Responding to OSHA’s requirement that every employer provides first aid assistance in the workplace, these guidelines document the minimum knowledge and skills necessary for an individual to provide basic life support care to an ill or injured person until professional emergency response arrives.

While starting a first aid program can be simple and inexpensive, it involves several essential steps:

Recognize that it is your responsibility as an employer to determine the requirements for your first aid program. As you assess your workplace, be mindful of the job site or work process that could cause illness or injury to employees. What types of accidents could reasonably occur in your workplace? Consider such things as falls, hazardous machinery, and exposure to harmful substances. Be sure to put your evaluation in writing for reference purposes. Remember that, while OSHA does not recommend nor approve programs, it may evaluate your program’s adequacy during an inspection.

Powered Industrial Truck Safety

Assess the location and availability of a medical facility to your workplace. If a hospital, clinic or other such emergency response is not readily available, for instance, within three to four minutes, you must have at least one employee trained in first aid and CPR per shift. There is no recommended number of trained employees to have on staff; it largely depends on your facility’s size and type of operations. Responding in a timely manner can mean the difference between life and death, so it is crucial that you have an appropriate number of employees trained.

For organizations in multiple sites, such as construction operations, a larger number of employees must be trained. Many experts believe all employees should know how to provide first aid and CPR to ensure that help is always at hand. At a minimum, each department or location should have a responder available on each shift.

Make sure you have suitable first aid supplies readily available at all times. Effective Aug. 17, 1998, OSHA added an Appendix A to its very basic First Aid and Medical standard found in 29 CFR 1910.151. It requires the employer to reference ANSI Z308.1-1978, Minimum Requirements for Industrial Unit-Type First Aid Kits.

According to OSHA, the contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small worksites. However, larger or multiple operations should consider the need for additional first aid kits and additional types of first aid equipment and supplies in larger quantities. OSHA suggests consulting a local fire and rescue department appropriate medical professional or first aid supplier for assistance in these circumstances.

FA Cabinet

OSHA recommends you periodically assess your kit and increase your supplies as needed. Place your first aid supplies in an easily accessible area, and inform all your employees of its location. Along with a well-stocked, workplace-specific first aid kit, other basic supplies normally include emergency oxygen, blankets, stretchers, directional signs, eyewash stations and burn stations.

In addition to these items, if blood-related incidents are anticipated, you must provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) as mandated in OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). It lists specific PPE for this type of exposure, such as gloves, gowns, face shields, masks, and eye protection.

On-site safety inspections, review of hazards and emergency dispatch, assessment, implementation, escape and treatment should be discussed in your training program. Employees must be trained to act and think quickly to avoid delayed treatment during an emergency. Ask yourself, whether each employee knows how to report an injury or illness.

Outline the accident investigating and reporting procedures and relay that to your employees as part of your company’s policy. Early recognition and treatment of an injury or illness is essential.

Employees must be aware of emergency contact information. It is best to post emergency procedures and emergency office contact numbers with your first aid supplies or in another highly visible and accessible area. Make sure that your field personnel also have suitable supplies and office contact numbers readily available. Appoint an employee in each department to watch for hazards and evaluate its current first aid status. Set a deadline to report any hazards or first aid needs to a manager or supervisor for improvement or correction.

Since people tend to forget their first aid training over time, OSHA recommends refresher training be conducted to recharge employees’ knowledge of first aid procedures. At a minimum, employees should be certified annually to perform CPR and once every three years to perform first aid. If such training sounds burdensome, consider that it can produce safer work practices and fewer incidents among employees.

Keeping the workplace safe involves three basic elements: steps to prevent or minimize accidents, adequate first aid supplies and proper first aid training. The employer uses training to make sure its employees know what to do, how to do it and who is in charge in case a first aid or emergency situation occurs. Proper first aid training not only satisfies OSHA requirements, but fosters good will among employees, who recognize the care that their company expends to provide a safe and healthy environment for its most valuable asset: its employees.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Safety specialist

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Source: https://www.ehstoday.com/news/ehs_imp_33547


OSHA – An Amazing Resource You Might Not Know About….

OSHA Can Help In a Surprising Way…

OSHA’s offers on-site consultation program and the best part? it’s FREE and confidential for small & medium-sized businesses operating across the U.S.

A great benefit that OSHA offers to small, medium or newly established businesses is a FREE safety consultation service. OSHA on-site consultation services are provided to companies who request the service, with priority given to high-hazard worksites. This free program is available to small & medium businesses operating in the United States.

Don’t worry, OSHA is here to help with this valuable program. These on-site consultation services are not part of the OSHA enforcement department and you will not get penalties or citations, even if things at your company aren’t quite perfect. If applicable, companies may even qualify for a one-year exemption from routine OSHA inspections by utilizing the free service. Your obligation is to make a commitment and follow through with correction serious workplace safety and health hazards.

OSHA consultants are from state agencies and universities and they work with employers to help identify workplace hazards. The consultants will also provide advice on OSHA compliance standards and can also assist the company to set up health and safety programs that fit the business.

On-Site Consultants Will:

  • Help you recognize hazards in your workplace.

  • Suggest general approaches or options for solving a safety or health problem.

  • Identify kinds of help available if you need further assistance.

  • Provide you a written report summarizing findings.

  • Assist you to develop or maintain an effective safety and health programs.

  • Provide training and education for you and your employees.

The On-Site Consultants Will Not:

  • Issue citations or propose penalties for violations of OSHA standards.

  • Report possible violations to OSHA enforcement staff.

  • Guarantee that your workplace will “pass” an OSHA inspection.

Theis program is entirely voluntary, OSHA will not approach you about participating. Any employer who wants to benefit from this free service must request it.

Visit OSHA’s Consultation Directory at osha.gov to learn more.

 

Are you looking for a little extra help with Safety Training? 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety Training Specialist

 

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It’s Time to Thank Members of the Nation’s Most-Trusted Profession

It’s Time to Thank Members of the Nation’s Most-Trusted Profession, Nurses.

 

For the past 16 years, the Gallup poll has named nurses as the most-trusted profession in its ratings of honesty and ethical standards in professions.

The poll showed 82% of Americans describe nurses’ ethics as high or very high. By comparison, 60% rated members of Congress as low or very low for honesty and ethical standards.

 

Some restaurants across the country are showing nurses a little love by offering freebies and discounts for National Nurses Week this week.

The week goes through May 12, which was the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.

Nurse appreciation deals

Participation can vary. To be on the safe side, check with your closest restaurants.

CinnabonThrough May 12, nurses get one free Cinnabon Classic Roll, MiniBon Roll or a four-count BonBites when they show their badge at participating locations.

Culver’sThere’s not a nationwide promotion and individual locations may offer specials throughout the week for nurses with a valid ID. One way to check is by calling your closest location and some may post specials on the location’s details page at www.culvers.com.

Jimboy’s Tacos: Nurses who show a valid employee ID get a buy-one-get-one free deal on the California-based chain’s Original Ground Beef Tacos through Saturday. Limit three free tacos per nurse at participating locations.

Pollo TropicalThrough Saturday, nurses get 25% off any purchase when they show their healthcare ID and use code 651 at checkout, according to a Facebook post.

Potbelly Sandwich ShopThrough Saturday, show your medical ID or wear your scrubs for a free fountain drink or cookie with the purchase of a sandwich or salad. Limited to one per customer.

More deals: Individual franchises of national chains including Chick-fil-A might also have freebies and specials for nurses. Locally-owned businesses also will honor nurses and one of the easiest ways to find out is to check restaurants’ social media channels.

Credit; Kelly Tyco – USAToday.com


American Heart Association introduces new mobile app


My Cardiac Coach
Heart attack is scary and confusing. Recovery shouldn’t be.

My Cardiac Coach app available on the Apple App Store or the Google Play is designed to be a personalized recovery toolkit on your smartphone.

• Trustworthy information from the experts at the American Heart Association

• Interactive lessons to help you learn what you need to know

• Progress-trackers for monitoring blood pressure and weight

• Tools for logging physical activity and managing medications

• Connections to other survivors through our Support Network

heart.org

 

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5 Reasons Why Basic First Aid Knowledge Is Important

People often don’t consider the importance of basic first aid education. There are numerous reasons why people put it off.

  • They don’t have the time
  • They don’t know where to begin
  • They don’t believe that accidents will ever happen to them or those close to them
  • They think they already have enough knowledge should the need arise
  1. Helps to save lives.

A trained person is more reliable, confident, and in control of themselves when an emergency arises. People who are trained are more likely to take immediate action in an emergency situation.

  1. It allows the rescuer to provide the victim comfort.

Having someone trained in first aid can bring immediate relief to the patient. Being calm and assessing the situation helps the patient relax while their injuries are being treated and stabilized until emergency personnel arrives.

  1. It gives you tools to prevent the situation from becoming worse.

In some situations, if a patient doesn’t receive basic first aid care immediately their situation will deteriorate – often rapidly. By being able to provide basic care you can stabilize a patient until emergency medical services arrive. You’ll learn how to use basic household items as tools if a first aid kit is not available meaning that you’ll be able to cope with many situations.

You’ll also be trained in how to collect information and data about what happened and the patients’ condition. This information will be passed on to the emergency services, which saves them time – you will be a valuable link in the chain of survival.

  1. It creates the confidence to care.

Having a basic first aid knowledge means that you’ll be confident in your skills and abilities in relation to first aid administration. By taking first aid training, it helps you to reflect on yourself and how you and others react in certain situations. Having this understanding will boost your confidence in a wide range of non-medical day-to-day situations.

  1. It encourages healthy and safe living.

A trained person is better able to assess their surroundings. Knowledge of first aid promotes a sense of safety and well-being amongst people. Having an awareness and desire to be accident-free keeps you safer and reduces the number of causalities and accidents.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid Service Specialist

Shop Now for UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid Products & Services

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Emergency burn care and treatment – Stop the Burn

Seconds count, when burns occur. Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

  1. Immediately stop the burning process
  2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient
  3. Provide pain relief
  4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact area
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

Four Critical Steps To Burn Treatment When Burns Occur

Seconds count, when burns occur.

Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

  1. Immediately stop the burning process
  2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient
  3. Provide pain relief
  4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

First Aid Service

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact are
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

 

Click here to shop for burn care products

Do you need First Aid Service for your company? Call 1-800-869-7970 to learn about Onsite First Aid Services for your business or click on the “Live Chat” button on the right side of your screen

 


Emergency Burn Care and Treatment Seconds Count

Seconds count, when burns occur. Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

How To Treat A Burn

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

1  Immediately stop the burning process

2 Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient

3 Provide pain relief

4 Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Water Gel

Benefits of burn dressings

• Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation

• Acts as a heat exchanger

• Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact are

• Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact

• Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia

• Stops the burning process

• Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!

• Cools the burn, dissipates heat

• Provides pain relief

• Easy to use

• Evaporates slowly

• Use on any burn

• Non-adherent, easy to remove

• Covers and protects against contamination

• Helps prevent infection

• Water-soluble

• Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

1 https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

 

Click here to shop for burn care products

Call 1-800-869-7970 to learn about Onsite First Aid Services for your business

 

Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

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