Signs of a heart attack, you need to read this…..

What is a heart attack?

A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart is suddenly blocked. Part of the heart may die if the person doesn’t get help quickly.

Some common signs of a heart attack include:

  • Pain or discomfort in the center or left side of the chest – or a feeling of pressure, squeezing, or fullness
  • Pain or discomfort in the upper body – like the arms, back, shoulders, neck, jaw, or upper stomach (above the belly button)
  • Shortness of breath or trouble breathing (while resting or being active)
  • Feeling sick to your stomach or throwing up
  • Stomach ache or feeling like you have heartburn
  • Feeling dizzy, light-headed, or unusually tired
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat

Not everyone who has a heart attack will have all the signs. Learn more about the signs of a heart attack.

Don’t ignore changes in how you feel.

Signs of a heart attack often come on suddenly. But sometimes, they develop slowly – hours, days, or even weeks before a heart attack happens.

Talk to your doctor if you feel unusually tired for several days, or if you develop any new health problems (like pain or trouble breathing). It’s also important to talk to your doctor if existing health issues (like pain) are bothering you more than usual.

If you’ve had a heart attack in the past, it’s important to know that symptoms of a new heart attack might be different from your last one – so talk with your doctor if you have any concerns about how you feel.

Stay tuned for our next heart health post next week…

Source: https://healthfinder.gov/HealthTopics/Category/health-conditions-and-diseases/heart-health/keep-your-heart-healthy#the-basics_3

 

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Why you should know the difference between Sudden Cardiac Arrest and a Heart attack…

Often times sudden cardiac arrest and heart attack are used synonymously. In truth, the two are very different from one another.

Sudden cardiac arrest is when the heart malfunctions and suddenly stops beating. A heart attack is when blood flow to the heart is blocked.

In short, a heart attack is about “circulation” and sudden cardiac arrest is an “electrical” problem.

 

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when a blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished begins to die. The longer a person goes without receiving treatment, greater damage will be done to the heart. Symptoms can occur almost immediately. Materializing as a sharp pain in the chest, and may travel to the arm, shoulder and back. The symptoms may occur slowly over days or weeks prior to a heart attack. These symptoms often appear as shortness of breath or heartburn. Unlike with sudden cardiac arrest, the heart usually doesn’t stop beating during a heart attack.

 

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest occurs suddenly and very often without warning. It is when the heart abruptly begins to beat in an abnormal or irregular rhythm called (arrhythmia). Without organized electrical activity in the heart muscle, there is no consistent contraction of the ventricles, which results in the heart’s inability to generate an adequate cardiac output. With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Within seconds a person will lose consciousness and have no pulse. Death can occur within minutes if the victim does not receive immediate treatment.

Heart attacks do increase the risk for sudden cardiac arrest. Other heart conditions can also increase the likelihood for sudden cardiac arrest as well. These conditions include a thickened heart cardiomyopathyheart failure, arrhythmias, particularly ventricular fibrillation, and long Q-T syndrome.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

A cardiac arrest victim can be saved if treated immediately. First, **call 9-1-1 for emergency medical services. Then get a Defibrillator (AED) automated external defibrillator if one is available and use it as soon as it arrives. Begin CPR immediately and continue until professional emergency medical personnel arrive. If two people are available, one should begin CPR immediately while the other calls 9-1-1 and finds the Defibrillator.

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death

There are over 320,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. By performing Hands-Only CPR, you can double or even triple a victim’s chance of survival.

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The Perfect Gift for Christmas – First Aid/CPR Certification

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

Need a new idea for the perfect Christmas gift for your employees?

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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Just days after learning CPR, local girl saves a life

Just six short days after becoming certified in Basic Life Support and CPR, Teonna Harris, a dental assisting student from Parkesburg, PA. had to put those skills to use in her own home.

On Saturday, Nov. 10, just hours before graduation, Harris’ grandmother went into cardiac arrest in their family home. Without hesitation, she began performing chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth breathing. Those same skills she learned days before, allowed her to save her grandmother, who is now recovering in a local hospital.

“Had it not been for the generosity of a local training provider, the outcome could have been tragic for this local family,” said Sean MacCrory.

CPR can be life-saving first aid and increases the person’s chances of survival if started soon after the heart has stopped beating. If no CPR is performed, it only takes three to four minutes for the person to become brain dead due to a lack of oxygen. Harris said she is glad she learned the new skills.

Source: https://www.dailylocal.com/news/local/just-days-after-learning-cpr-local-girl-saves-a-life/article_f9c65204-e6ae-11e8-b73a-833bcd1765a2.html

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Bus driver, first responders honored for saving teen in cardiac arrest

A group of first responders and a school bus driver in Rowlett were honored Wednesday for saving a 16-year old boy.

Bus driver Jim Griffin deserves most of the credit as what he saw and what he did helped make the happy reunion possible. “God just puts people where he needs them to be when He needs them to be there,” Griffin said.

Griffin was driving his regular school bus route on Brownlee Boulevard on Sept. 28 when he saw something that stopped him in his tracks.

“I rolled down the street and about another 60 yards, there’s a body lying in the street,” Griffin said.

He immediately got out and dialed 911.

“He’s face down in the street, I reach down, I feel for a pulse, there isn’t one,” Griffin said.

The 911 dispatcher told him to start CPR. He can be seen in dash camera video as police arrived, furiously trying to keep the teen alive. Griffin says as he rolled the teen over, he recognized his face.

 

It was Nabil Mohmoud, 16, who was born with a heart defect but had it repaired when he was born. He’d never had any problems until that day, when he forgot his wallet at home and ran back to get it.

Doctors say the rush back to the bus stop caused a sudden irregular rhythm in his heart and he collapsed in the street.

“I turned the corner and I ran, I think the middle of the street here is where I passed out is what they told me,” Mohmoud said. Griffin performed CPR until Rowlett police and paramedics arrived to jump in and help.

“At that point in time, you’re in cardiac arrest, you don’t have a pulse, you are for all intents and purposes dead. The only thing keeping you alive at that point in time is CPR,” said Dr. Jared Wolf, emergency medicine physician, Baylor Scott & White. That CPR bought enough time to revive the teen and get him to the ER.

“This amazing thing, that many people helped save his life, you know. That’s a good thing,” said dad Fakher Abdulamir.Mohmoud, words weren’t enough, but he was extremely thankful.

“I just want to thank them for everything,” he said. All were given an award for their efforts, but griffin says he already has his reward.

“The best thing that ever happened was he came back to my bus,” Griffin said.

 

Source: http://www.fox4news.com/news/bus-driver-first-responders-honored-for-saving-teen-in-cardiac-arrest

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First Aid/CPR Training just in time for the holidays

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes – November 19th – 23rd

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Need different dates?

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

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Confused about First Aid in the workplace? This quick read will help…

First Aid in the workplace

Employers are required by OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.151 to have a person or persons adequately trained to render first aid for worksites that are not in near proximity to an infirmary, clinic, or hospital.

It is advised that the first-aid program for a particular workplace be designed to reflect the known and anticipated risks of the specific work environment. Consultation with local emergency medical experts and providers of first-aid training is encouraged when developing a first-aid program. The program must comply with all applicable OSHA standards and regulations.

 

First-aid supplies must be available in adequate quantities and be readily accessible. Click here for First Aid Kit requirements.

First-aid training courses should include instruction in general and workplace hazard-specific knowledge and skills.

CPR training – OSHA requires certain employers to have CPR-trained rescuers on site. Sudden cardiac arrest is a potential risk at all worksites, regardless of the type of work. Serious consideration should be given to establishing a workplace AED program and should incorporate AED training if an AED is available at the worksite. First-aid training should be repeated periodically to maintain and update knowledge and skills. Management commitment and worker involvement is vital in developing, implementing and assessing a workplace first-aid program.

Click on the link below for the full OSHA publication

https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3317first-aid.pdf

 

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Firefighters share the importance of an AED

 

Les Morgan’s life was saved by the quick response of those around him earlier this year. The 60-year-old firefighter with Schuylkill Hose Company No. 2 and borough resident responded to smoke in a structure and was handing his son, who is also a firefighter, a fire extinguisher when suddenly he was on the floor not breathing normally.

Les Morgan was suffering a cardiac arrest

EMS, firefighters and Schuylkill Haven Police Department officers all had a hand in saving Les Morgan. Kyle Morgan didn’t know everyone who helped save his father’s life, but trusted they knew what to do while he waited outside.

“He was down for less than two minutes,” Morgan said.

Within that time, 90 seconds of CPR was given and Morgan was shocked with the AED, which reads your heart rhythm and determines if a shock is needed. It then gives procedural instructions.

“A lot of people are afraid they are going to hurt someone,” by using the AED, Kyle Morgan said.

Every minute CPR is not given, the survival rate drops by 10 percent, according to the AHA.

About 70 percent of sudden cardiac arrests occur at home, while the remainder occur in public settings and nursing homes, according to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

Source: Standard-Speaker

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CPR/First Aid  – Corporate Classes October 15th – 19th

CPR/First Aid  – Corporate and Group Classes October 15th – 19th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

The class is a great team building opportunity for companies and groups while learning to save a life!

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

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Companies learning CPR reap the side benefit of team building

Learning CPR can not only help to save a life, but it can bring your company closer together.

 

Taking a four-hour CPR course with your co-workers can build trust and understanding among employees.

Everyone working together toward a common goal builds stronger working relationships and understanding amongst workers.

Articles like this one form the New York Times, show how putting individuals in a situation where each person is on a level playing field learning together creates unity.

“It breaks down divisions,” Richard Hough III, the chairman and chief executive of the Silvercrest Asset Management Group, said of the courses. “You could have the C.E.O. next to the receptionist. You’re on an equal plain.”

Many workplaces try various team building exercises. They take company outings, attend seminars, different retreats, or parties. Learning CPR however, really brings teams together. Good communication is key for Chain of Survival. Learning CPR and working as team forces good communication. Teams learn to trust one another and most important become a team with a single task to save a life.

Next time your thinking about a team building event, schedule a CPR class and make your team building fun, memorable and learn to save a life.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

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