3 types of bleeding and how to control them…

Stop the Bleed Month

 

May is National “Stop the Bleed Month” Here are some important tips to share

External blood is when blood leaves the body through any type of wound. First aid responders should be competent at dealing with major blood loss. There are broadly three different types of bleeding: arterial, venous and capillary.

How much blood do we have?
The average adult human as anywhere between 8 and 12 pints of blood depending on their body size.

Remember that children have less blood than adults, and as such cannot afford to lose the same amount – a baby only has around 1 pint of blood.

Stop the Bleed Month

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arterial
With this type of bleeding, the blood is typically bright red to yellowish in color, due to the high degree of oxygenation. A wound to a major artery could result in blood ‘spurting’ in time with the heartbeat, several meters and the blood volume will rapidly reduce.

Venous
This blood is flowing from a damaged vein. As a result, it is blackish in color (due to the lack of oxygen it transports) and flows in a steady manner. Caution is still indicated: while the blood loss may not be arterial, it can still be quite substantial, and can occur with surprising speed without intervention.

Capillary
Bleeding from capillaries occurs in all wounds. Although the flow may appear fast at first, blood loss is usually slight and is easily controlled. Bleeding from a capillary could be described as a ‘trickle’ of blood.

The key first aid treatment for all of these types of bleeding is direct pressure over the wound.

 

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3 different types of bleeding and how to control them

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First aid responders should be competent at dealing with major blood loss. There are broadly three different types of bleeding: arterial, venous and capillary.

How much blood do we have?
The average adult human as anywhere between 8 and 12 pints of blood depending on their body size.

Remember that children have less blood than adults, and as such cannot afford to lose the same amount – a baby only has around 1 pint of blood.

What are the different types of bleeding?

Arterial

With this type of bleeding, the blood is typically bright red to yellowish in color, due to the high degree of oxygenation. A wound to a major artery could result in blood ‘spurting’ in time with the heartbeat, several meters and the blood volume will rapidly reduce.

Venous
This blood is flowing from a damaged vein. As a result, it is blackish in color (due to the lack of oxygen it transports) and flows in a steady manner. Caution is still indicated: while the blood loss may not be arterial, it can still be quite substantial, and can occur with surprising speed without intervention.

Capillary
Bleeding from capillaries occurs in all wounds. Although the flow may appear fast at first, blood loss is usually slight and is easily controlled. Bleeding from a capillary could be described as a ‘trickle’ of blood.

The key first aid treatment for all of these types of bleeding is direct pressure over the wound.

Call 911 if you have a medical emergency

 

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CPR Saves lives at Food 4 Less

Medford, OR. Fire-Rescue honored four distinct community members, as well as local business, Food 4 Less, on Thursday for their heroic and fast-acting efforts that saved two lives in December.

Over the Christmas holiday, two separate incidents that both involved people going into cardiac arrest, happened a week apart at the same Medford Food 4 Less. According to Medford Fire-Rescue, both patients required a “Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated External Defibrillation (AED).”

The first incident, on December 22nd, began as a reported car crashing into the Food 4 Less building. Several employees and a customer moved quickly to check on the driver and realized she was not responsive or breathing.

They called for help, turned off the car, and pulled her out to begin CPR. One of the employees ran inside the building to retrieve the closest AED. The first arriving Medford Police officer on-scene assisted with CPR until Medford Fire-Rescue firefighters arrived to relieve them. “We happened to be walking by going in shopping and just rendered care to her as we saw fit to what’s going on,” Cliff Maris, local United States Postal Service employee said.

Maris has a history of valiant acts and medical training from his six years in the air force as a Medical Evacuation Specialist 452nd, who served during the first war in Iraq. Maris said helping and taking care of people are the two reasons that motivated him to join the military. “It’s just the training we had in the military that [tells us to] go to it and then take care of the problem instead of running away from it,” Maris said.

“Due to the rapid and effective CPR performance, the patient arrived to the hospital with a pulse, and a chance,” said Melissa Cano, Emergency Manager for Medford Fire-Rescue.

A week later on December 28th, a Food 4 Less employee was alerted of an unresponsive person, hunched over on a bench. The very same employee who assisted in the previous week’s incident again responded, and was instrumental in the life-saving efforts. They acted swiftly: calling for help, starting CPR, and even issuing a shock from the store AED before the first responders arrived.

“Both incidents are a true testament to the willingness of those in our community to help a person in need,” said Cano. “Medford Fire-Rescue is not only proud to recognize these individuals, but highlight the importance of being properly trained in CPR. Every community member can potentially assist others, and even, save a life.”

 

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Telephone CPR could save lives, but…

When someone calls 911, the time it takes for paramedics to arrive can be the difference between life and death.

Minnesota lawmaker Julie Sandstede knows this. She represents a rural area, where ambulances may take longer to arrive on the scene of a medical emergency.
When her husband experienced cardiac arrest in 2011, the dispatcher sent the ambulance the wrong way. Luckily, he was saved by a bystander who performed CPR on him under the guidance of a 911 operator.
“(The operator) was able to assess the situation and give direction to what intervention was needed,” Sandstede said. “We were so fortunate.”
Her husband, Evan Sandstede, was lucky to have an operator who knew how to walk someone through CPR. But that’s not always the case.
“When I learned that not all 911 operators are trained in how to instruct CPR over the phone, I couldn’t believe it,” Sandstede said. “I was shocked. … This is unconscionable.”
This legislative session, the Democratic lawmaker has proposed legislation in Minnesota that would require all 911 operators to be trained in telephone CPR.
Telephone CPR is the process in which a 911 operator helps the caller identify cardiac arrest with a short script and provides “just-in-time” instructions on how to provide CPR, said Dr. Michael Kurz, chairman of the American Heart Association’s Telecommunicator-CPR Task Force.
Sandstede proposed the bill after she was approached by the American Heart Association, which has been lobbying for these kinds of laws nationwide.

At least six states already require telephone CPR

At least six states already require 911 operators to be trained in telephone CPR, according to the American Heart Association. They are Louisiana, Kentucky, Wisconsin, Indiana, West Virginia and Maryland.
However, the American Heart Association has been lobbying for all states to adopt telephone CPR requirements. The organization said it would be a cost-effective way to increase the survival rates of people who experience cardiac arrest outside a hospital.
Widespread implementation of telephone CPR would include three to four hours of initial training and a yearly refresher, said Kurz.
“When we talk about public health interventions, this is a relatively low-cost, very high-yield way to improve public health,” he said.
Sandstede said her bill is modeled after Wisconsin’s law, which was enacted in 2018 and set aside $250,000 for telephone CPR training.

Telephone CPR could increase survival rates

About 350,000 sudden cardiac-arrest events occur in the United States each year, and survival rates nationwide average about 10%, Kurz said.
2018 Cleveland Clinic survey found that 54% of Americans say they know how to perform CPR. However, only 11% of respondents knew the correct pace for performing the chest compressions, the survey found.
Having a bystander provide CPR before paramedics arrive on the scene can double or even triple the rate of survival, Kurz said. Telephone CPR-trained 911 operators can identify whether someone is going into cardiac arrest with two questions, and can provide CPR instructions in about 20 seconds.
“The public largely assumes that if you call 911, you’ll receive instructions on whatever the medical emergency is,” Kurz added. “In reality, we know that there’s a very large disconnect.”
Some people think that telephone CPR is equivalent to practicing medicine and only physicians who are licensed should do that. However, Kurz said that is a misconception that is hindering public health.

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Source: https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/09/health/telephone-cpr-trnd/index.html

February is heart awareness month – What you need to know…

When to Call 911

Call 911 right away if you or someone else has signs of a heart attack.

Don’t ignore any signs or feel embarrassed to call for help. Acting fast can save a life. Call 911 even if you aren’t sure it’s a heart attack.

An ambulance is the best and safest way to get to the hospital. In an ambulance, EMTs (emergency medical technicians) can keep track of how you are doing and start life-saving treatments right away.

People who call an ambulance often get treated faster at the hospital. And, if you call 911, the operator can tell you what to do until the ambulance gets there.

Know Your Numbers

Take steps today to lower your risk for heart disease.

Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.

High cholesterol and high blood pressure can cause heart disease and heart attack. If your cholesterol or blood pressure numbers are high, you can take steps to lower them.

Get your cholesterol checked.

It’s important to get your cholesterol checked at least every 4 to 6 years. Some people will need to get it checked more or less often.

Get your blood pressure checked.

Starting at age 18, get your blood pressure checked regularly. High blood pressure has no signs or symptoms.

 

Talk to your doctor about taking medicine to lower your risk of heart attack and stroke. 

Experts recommend that some people ages 40 to 75 take medicines called statins if they are at high risk for heart attack and stroke. Use these questions to talk with your doctor about statins.

Learn CPR today! CPR Certification

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Source: https://healthfinder.gov/HealthTopics/Category/health-conditions-and-diseases/heart-health


A Phone app for CPR trained citizens…

Phone app alerts CPR trained citizens of nearby cardiac arrest incidents

Ramsey County is rolling out a new smartphone app that alerts people trained in CPR to any cardiac arrest incident that may be near them.

“If a citizen, a bystander can intervene and if they can find an AED, our efforts can be much more effective and we’re finally going to move the mark on cardiac arrest survivability in our communities,” said Maplewood EMS Chief Mike Mondor.

A new smartphone app, called PulsePoint, uses the phone’s geo-tracking technology to alert those trained in CPR to a nearby cardiac arrest. The app is tied into the Ramsey County 911 center to send out push notifications when a cardiac arrest call comes in.

“It’s going to show my location by the blue dot,” said Ramsey County Emergency Communications Manager Johnathan Rasch. “It’s going to show me the location that’s been reported of the cardiac arrest. And then, that AED icon is showing me the location of a public AED, and so that is visible here. And so, if I scroll around a little bit I can see things that might be nearby.”

The goal is to save time.

Every minute that a victim goes without oxygen to their brain reduces the chances of survival significantly,” said Lakeview Hospital Medical Director Dr. Bjorn Peterson. “So, by getting this technology out and letting the community respond to these events and help each other, we can double or even triple the chances that the victim is going to survive. And not just survive, but with minimal to none of the permanent brain damage.”

It’s about life and power, all in the palm of our hands.

“The opportunity to save someone when they are literally nearing death’s door is something that’s rare and it can change someone’s lives literally forever,” said Chief Mondor. “So, by downloading this app we ensure that more people are ready to save our neighbors.”

St. Louis Park, Winona, and Moorehead are already using this technology. Ramsey County says there were 60 cardiac arrest events in the county last year where a bystander could have made a difference in saving a life.


One New Years resolution you must make – Get CPR/First Aid training

CPR/First Aid – 2021 Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Our CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Call Now to speak with a First Aid/CPR Specialist

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5 Reasons Why Basic First Aid Knowledge Is Important

People often don’t consider the importance of basic first aid education.

There are numerous reasons why people put it off.

  • They don’t have the time
  • They don’t know where to begin
  • They don’t believe that accidents will ever happen to them or those close to them
  • They think they already have enough knowledge should the need arise
  1. Helps to save lives.

A trained person is more reliable, confident, and in control of themselves when an emergency arises. People who are trained are more likely to take immediate action in an emergency situation.

  1. It allows the rescuer to provide the victim comfort.

Having someone trained in first aid can bring immediate relief to the patient. Being calm and assessing the situation helps the patient relax while their injuries are being treated and stabilized until emergency personnel arrives.

  1. It gives you tools to prevent the situation from becoming worse.

In some situations, if a patient doesn’t receive basic first aid care immediately their situation will deteriorate – often rapidly. By being able to provide basic care you can stabilize a patient until emergency medical services arrive. You’ll learn how to use basic household items as tools if a first aid kit is not available meaning that you’ll be able to cope with many situations.

You’ll also be trained in how to collect information and data about what happened and the patients’ condition. This information will be passed on to the emergency services, which saves them time – you will be a valuable link in the chain of survival.

  1. It creates confidence to care.

Having basic first aid knowledge means that you’ll be confident in your skills and abilities in relation to first aid administration. By taking first aid training, it helps you to reflect on yourself and how you and others react in certain situations. Having this understanding will boost your confidence in a wide range of non-medical day to day situations.

  1. It encourages healthy and safe living.

A trained person is better able to assess their surroundings. Knowledge of first aid promotes a sense of safety and well being amongst people. Having an awareness and desire to be accident-free keeps you safer and reduces the number of causalities and accidents.

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Less than 20% of Americans are equipped to perform CPR, lets change that…

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Our CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team-building opportunity!

 

Call Now to speak with a First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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#cprreadytosavealife #cprteambuilding

 

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Here’s a Great Way to Help Those Nasty Bug Bites

Whether you’re in the water, on a mountain trail, or in your backyard, the wildlife you encounter have ways of protecting themselves and their territory.

Insects such as bees, ants, fleas, flies, mosquitoes, wasps, and arachnids may bite or sting.

The initial contact of a bite may be painful. It’s often followed by an allergic reaction to venom deposited into your skin through the insect’s mouth or stinger. Most bites and stings trigger nothing more than minor discomfort, but some encounters can be deadly, especially if you have severe allergies to the insect venom.

The insects you should recognize and understand depend very much on where you live or where you’re visiting. Different regions of the United States are home to many of these creatures.

The season also matters. For example, mosquitoes, stinging bees, and wasps tend to come out in full force during the summer.

Mosquito bites

  • A mosquito bite is a small, round, puffy bump that appears soon after you’ve been bitten
  • The bump will become red, hard, swollen, and itchy
  • You may have multiple bites in the same area

Flea bites

  • Usually located in clusters on the lower legs and feet
  • Itchy, red bump surrounded by a red halo
  • Symptoms begin immediately after being bitten

Bedbug bites

  • The itchy rash is caused by an allergic reaction to the bite of a bedbug
  • The small rashes have red, swollen areas and dark-red centers
  • Bites may appear in a line or grouped together, usually on areas of the body not covered by clothing, such as the hands, neck, or feet
  • There may be very itchy blisters or hives at the bite site

Fly bites

  • Painful, itchy rashes are caused by an inflammatory reaction at the site of the fly bite
  • Though usually harmless, they may lead to severe allergic reactions or spread insect-borne diseases
  • Take precautions when traveling to endemic countries by wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants and using bug spray

Chigger bites

  • Painful, itchy rashes may be caused by an immune response to the bites of tiny mite larva
  • Bites appear as welts, blisters, pimples, or hives
  • Bites will generally appear in groups and be extremely itchy
  • Chiggers bites may be grouped in skin folds or near areas where clothing fits tightly

Here is an easy solution to help reduce the symptoms of bug bites and stings. This simple yet highly effective tool works by suctioning out irritants left under the skin from a bug bite, and it’s reusable!

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