It’s Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month – Learn CPR

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Over 300,000 Americans die every year from Sudden Cardiac Arrest, be sure your company has first responders trained and ready to help save a life.

We make it easy! UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month – What You Should Know

More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)

SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS. To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. But they are not the same thing.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Awareness

October is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month, which represents a critical initiative by the Heart Rhythm Society to raise awareness for Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and help the public become more familiar with what it is, how it affects people, and what can be done to help save lives.

The Society’s award-winning “Apples and Oranges” campaign uses a simple analogy to educate people about the difference between a heart attack and SCA. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. The campaign targets heart attack survivors, who are at the highest risk for SCA, and stresses the importance of maintaining a healthy heart lifestyle and learning critical risk markers, especially their Ejection Fraction (EF).

This public service announcement explains the dangers of SCA and features Emmy-award winning journalist Shaun Robinson.

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest

  • More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest.
  • SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS.
  • To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring.

Responding to SCA — Time is Everything

Time-to-treatment is critical when considering the chance of survival for an SCA victim. Ninety-five percent of those who experience SCA die because they do not receive life-saving defibrillation within four to six minutes, before brain and permanent death start to occur. Learn more about the steps to take when responding to a potential SCA emergency.

SCA Resources

Patients can access information about SCA, including causes, prevention, and other important facts.

SCArisk.org

Learn your SCA risk by using an interactive online tool. It’s fast and easy — simply answer a few questions regarding your health and get your results. After you have finished using the assessment, please consult with your physician regarding your results.

 

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Source: https://www.hrsonline.org/sudden-cardiac-arrest-sca-awareness


Post-Dispatch’s Goold helps save man’s life at Busch Stadium

Before he chronicled the Cardinals’ first division title-clinching since 2015, Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold helped save a man’s life Sunday at Busch Stadium.

St. Louis-based videographer Mike Flanary, 64, collapsed in the Cubs’ dugout before the game and was briefly without a pulse before CPR was performed by Goold, a longtime former lifeguard and Eagle Scout trained in CPR. After receiving further medical attention from the Cubs’ training staff and then emergency medical personnel, Flanary was transferred to Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Medical officials said Flanary, who was working for a Chicago television affiliate for Sunday’s game, was in “critical but stable” condition after suffering a heart attack and then a stroke.

Cardinals’ security director Phil Melcher, asked about Goold’s immediate assistance, said it was “huge. You cannot discount that, at all. I absolutely thanked him.”

Washington University’s Dr. David Tan, the stadium doctor on duty Sunday at Busch, said, “So many people are afraid of doing CPR. But, because of (Goold’s) actions, he was the first link in that chain of survival.

“It’s fabulous. It was the early CPR by Derrick Goold that probably saved his life. Derrick wasn’t afraid. He didn’t hesitate. And he did it.

“In the medical field, when you save somebody like this, they call it a clinical save. This is a clinical save that was started by Derrick Goold. Period.”

Bill Hayes, a registered nurse who was on duty as a supervisor, said, “Somebody said, ‘Does somebody know CPR? And Derrick said, ‘I do.’

Goold had just entered the dugout area just before the Cubs were to announce the dismissal of Joe Maddon as manager.

 

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Learn To Save a Life In 4 Hours – CPR Training, Are You Prepared?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

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Y employees use AED to save life

Critical seconds tick away. Training takes over. Josh Eckstein, a lifeguard at the Southeastern Indiana YMCA, knew what to do while on duty one morning in late July when he saw a Y member start to go under the water, says marketing coordinator Kathleen Bohman.

He immediately put the YMCA emergency protocols into action, pulling the member out of the water to perform CPR while Connie Fledderman, Welcome Center staff member, called EMS and came to assist Eckstein with the automated external defibrillator.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests happen outside of hospitals each year, and 90 percent of Americans who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. However, the American Heart Association estimates that properly administered CPR can triple a person’s odds of survival. Sadly, only 46 percent of cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander.

“I had no idea what was in store for me as I swam my regular laps that day,” recalls the Y member. “My heart stopped beating. Had this happened to me anywhere other than the Y, I may not be here to be able to talk about my good outcome.”

Y executive director Angie Harmeyer says, “In addition to our lifeguards being certified by the American Red Cross, we require all YMCA staff to be first aid/CPR/AED trained within the first 30 days of employment, followed by regular recertifications and in-service trainings. Providing a safe environment for our members and guests is everyone’s job. That also means being prepared.”

Why is CPR/AED training important?

  1) By performing simple procedures and following certain guidelines, it may be possible to save lives by giving basic treatment until professional medical help arrives.

 2) In an emergency, there’s no time to read instructions.

3) If you’ve memorized some of the basic procedures, it will help you react quickly and efficiently.

4) It can make the difference from complete recovery and permanent disability.

5) It can help save a life.

“Josh and Connie showed exactly why we put such an emphasis on CPR training for all city employees, companies and the general public who are eager to be certified,” said Batesville Fire Chief Todd Schutte. “Through their immediate response and actions, the patient survived the incident and is on the road to a full recovery.”

 

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Source: https://www.batesvilleheraldtribune.com/news/local_news/y-employees-use-aed-to-save-life/article_0d8867d8-c376-11e9-a09b-37d70bfea96b.html


Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work?

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

Click here to learn more about choosing the right AED for your business

 

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Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

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“Second chance at life:” Daughter uses CPR to save life of father in cardiac arrest

A 26-year-old lifeguard trained in CPR saved her father’s life

A 59-year-old Town of Farmington man was hosting a family gathering at his Green Lake home on Friday when he became unresponsive.

The man had no prior cardiac history.

His stepdaughter recognized the signs of cardiac distress and started CPR.

“The early intervention of CPR by the stepdaughter provided the critical time needed to get first responders on scene with the AED. Thanks to her, this man has a second chance at life.” Washington County Sheriff Martin Schulteis said. “Stories like this clearly demonstrate the importance for everyone to know basic CPR. One day you may need it to save a loved one, just as this stepdaughter did.”

The man regained consciousness before he was transported to the hospital.

The family said the man has recovered and is set to be released today.

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Source:https://www.cbs58.com/news/second-chance-at-life-daughter-uses-cpr-to-save-life-of-father-in-cardiac-arrest


First responders save man after 45 minutes of CPR

Shabiah Gordon’s near-death experience began in the early morning hours of February 24, when his wife Rosa Gordon noticed that her 39-year-old husband’s breathing was not normal.

Rosa tried unsuccessfully to wake up her husband, who had not had any health issues previously.

She called 911, and first responders arrived and sprang into action to help the father of four, who was in cardiac and respiratory arrest.

That’s when the determined paramedics performed CPR for 45 minutes, determined to get a pulse.

Officials say after two weeks in the intensive care unit, Gordon was able to walk out of the hospital, regaining full neurological function.

First responders from both teams include Office of EMS EMT Nicholas Gammello and Paramedic Jacob Gault; Clermont Fire Department Engine 101 team Firefighter/EMT Bruce Mace, Firefighter/EMT Jordan Bennett, Engineer/Paramedic Blake McCorkle, Lieutenant/EMT Jason Ness.

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Source: http://www.fox35orlando.com/home/first-responders-save-man-after-45-minutes-of-cpr


Are You Ready to Save a Life? – CPR Classes Available Now

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

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Mother saves daughter after drowning using CPR

A woman new to Central Texas is sharing her story after using CPR to save her daughter’s life.

“She’s the ultimate girly-girl. She loves all things sparkly and pink and purple and unicorns and babydolls and butterflies, dancing,” says Melissa Garcia, talking about her daughter Maddie.

Maddie is an extraordinary little girl. And at six years old, she already has an incredible story.

Her family says moments with the aspiring doctor and dancer are special because after a near-death experience at the pool, they thought she wouldn’t be here today.

The image her older brother saw on that hot summer day three years ago is one he’ll never forget.

“I just saw her floating in the water. I thought she was gone,” her older brother told FOX44.

Their mother Melissa Garcia was close by, and rushed to Maddie’s rescue – fearing all hope was lost.

“I yanked her up by her wrists, and she was kind of just limp and blue,” Garcia recalls.

Garcia knew CPR. But by the time she got to her, little Maddie was unresponsive without a pulse. She still did all she could to save her daughter.

“It took about ten to 12 minutes for the paramedics to arrive, so I just nonstop was doing CPR on her,” Garcia says.

She says the ten to 12 minutes felt like a lifetime.

“Every time I would blow air in her mouth, water would come out. So I kind of tilted her to the side and lay her back down and keep going,” Garcia says.

 

Doctors were able to save Maddie’s life, but they call her a miracle – a miracle that would have been impossible without CPR.

So during summer months like these, Garcia spreads Maddie’s story to other families.

“If this is what I can do, if this is what good comes out of that is me spreading the word out about how important pool safety and first aid CPR training is, then that’s what I’m going to do to help other people,” Garcia says.

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Source: https://www.centexproud.com/news/local/mother-saves-daughter-after-drowning-using-cpr/2059183427