Chances of survival are doubled when CPR is performed in conjunction with an AED.

Did You Know?…….

 

1. SCA (Sudden Cardiac Arrest) is the third leading cause of death in the U.S.

2. Approximately 356,000 people of all ages experience SCA each year

3. 9 out of 10 victims die

4. Effective bystanders intervention can triple survival rates

 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety created a chain of survival chart for you and your team, feel free to share (click on the link below).

 

Click here for a downloadable version to share with your team

 

 

Follow the chain of survival in the info graphic.

 

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This Box Could Save Your Life One Day…

Use of an Automated External Defibrillator can increase the cardiac arrest survival rate by a staggering 70%

Every 1.7 minutes, someone in America suffers Sudden Cardiac Arrest, otherwise known as SCA. If not treated, SCA can easily be fatal and it often is – more than a third of a million Americans die each year from sudden cardiac arrest. Perhaps more concerning is the fact that most of these incidents are fatal– and experts say that survival rates consistently hover at or below 10%.

However, when it comes to SCA, it’s not all doom and gloom. Automated External Defibrillators, or AEDs, have been helping both first responders and ordinary individuals safely resuscitate SCA victims and save lives without complex medical training. AEDs work by producing a small electrical charge that can reset a patient’s heart to its correct rhythm.

While easy-to-use portable defibrillators are only a few decades old, AEDs are so effective at saving lives that they’re estimated to increase SCA survival rates by a staggering 70%. Despite these statistics, many areas of the U.S. simply don’t have enough AEDs to go around. Experts estimate that an increase in AEDs to optimal levels could save more than 40,000 American lives each year – and that’s just one reason why it’s essential for more people to learn about and have access to this lifesaving device.

Communities with comprehensive AED training programs see a 40% increase in cardiac arrest survival rates

Experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest can be terrifying for a patient and their family – and the fact is, even the fastest first responders often take 8-12 minutes to reach a victim. An AED drastically improves the odds of survival. However, to be effective, an AED needs to be sufficiently close to an SCA victim, and that’s one of the reasons why community-based training programs have been so effective at helping resuscitate cardiac arrest victims across the country. AED programs may be even more important in rural areas, in which victims may suffer an SCA a hundred miles or more from the nearest major hospital. In that case, it could take an hour or more for first responders to arrive – a virtual death sentence if nearby individuals do not have easy access to an AED.

Where AEDs are located in the United States

As many people would expect, the vast majority of AEDs (59%) in the U.S. are currently owned by first responders such as a policemen, firefighters, and EMTs. The next largest group of AED owners are schools (17%), followed by faith-based and recreational organizations, nursing homes and senior centers, and hospitals, clinics, and other medical centers. It’s a good idea to know the general places in which the equipment is most likely to be located, so, in case of emergency, you have a better shot at finding (or helping others to find) a nearby AED. In addition, if you or a loved one has a close family member with a heart condition, you may want to inquire about where the closest AED is, especially if traveling to remote or rural areas.

More AEDs in public places can save lives

In the first 10 months after Chicago’s O’Hare Airport installed 49 AEDs on the premises, the devices were used 14 times, saving a total of nine lives – nearly 1 each month (and that’s only one airport). When it comes to helping an SCA victim, every second counts. According to statistics published by the American Heart Association, every additional minute AED use is delayed corresponds with a 10% reduction in patient survival rates. This means that in especially large areas or buildings, such as airports like O’Hare, it pays to have multiple AEDs located in different areas in order to facilitate easy access to the devices.

Despite their substantial benefits, 64% of Americans have never even seen an AED

While AEDs save an increasing number of lives each year, many Americans don’t even understand what they are. This widespread lack of knowledge means that individuals may not be able to get full use of the life-saving equipment present in their community. Additionally, a lack of understanding means that many Americans are less likely to push for more AEDs in their schools, religious and community centers, and other public areas.

While the number of AEDs is increasing, especially in places like college and university campuses, it’s not increasing fast enough to help many SCA victims. However, increased education and awareness may be able to help. And hopefully, this awareness will help make death from an SCA into an uncommon occurrence.

To learn more about how AEDs (and proper training in their usage) can help save lives in businesses, schools, and other public places, contact UniFirst First Aid + Safety for a free consultation.

 

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What is the Difference Between Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Heart attack?

Often times sudden cardiac arrest and heart attack are used synonymously. In truth the two are very different from one another.

Sudden cardiac arrest is when the heart malfunctions and suddenly stops beating. A heart attack is when blood flow to the heart is blocked.

In short a heart attack is about “circulation” and sudden cardiac arrest is an “electrical” problem.

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when a blocked artery prevents oxygen rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished begins to die. The longer a person goes without receiving treatment, greater damage will be done to the heart. Symptoms can occur almost immediately. Materializing as sharp pain in the chest, and may travel to the arm, shoulder and back. The symptoms may occur slowly over days or weeks prior to a heart attack. These symptoms often appear as shortness of breath or heartburn. Unlike with sudden cardiac arrest the heart usually doesn’t stop beating during a heart attack.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest occurs suddenly and very often without warning. It is when the heart abruptly begins to beat in an abnormal or irregular rhythm called (arrhythmia). Without organized electrical activity in the heart muscle, there is no consistent contraction of the ventricles, which results in the heart’s inability to generate an adequate cardiac output. With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Within seconds a person will lose consciousness and have no pulse. Death can occur within minutes if the victim does not receive immediate treatment.

Heart attacks do increase the risk for sudden cardiac arrest. Other heart conditions can also increase the likelihood for sudden cardiac arrest as well. These conditions include a thickened heart cardiomyopathy, heart failure, arrhythmias, particularly ventricular fibrillation, and long Q-T syndrome.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

A cardiac arrest victim can be saved if treated immediately. First, **call 9-1-1 for emergency medical services. Then get a Defibrillator (AED) automated external defibrillator if one is available and use it as soon as it arrives. Begin CPR immediately and continue until professional emergency medical personnel arrive. If two people are available, one should begin CPR immediately while the other calls 9-1-1 and finds the Defibrillator .

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death

There are over 320,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. By performing Hands-Only CPR, you can double or even triple a victim’s chance of survival.

 

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Cardiac Arrest VS. Heart Attack Infographic


Woman saved with CPR while attending conference

Sarah Stephenson (Photo Courtesy of WDEL)
Sarah Stephenson (Photo Courtesy of WDEL)

Sarah Stephenson was attending a a conference when she observed a woman nearby having a seizure in her chair.

“She was kind of just sitting there with her head back, so nothing really looked out of the norm,” said Stephenson. “You always want to check out things first before going over to a situation because you never really know what could be happening next, and the safety of you and others around you is still important.”

Stephenson and two of her co-workers Ranee Patterson and NAtalie HAwker, assisted her in placing the woman on the ground and she began CPR.

“I just did [it], and the next thing I know, I’m counting one, two, three, four, up to thirty, and then two breaths, and we did it again. Finally, until the paramedics arrived.”

Stephenson had previously been a lifeguard for 15 years so her training kicked in when it counted.

“If something were to happen, ‘Oh, wow, I know this, I can help this person,’” said Stephenson. “I mean it’s not a difficult task, but you do need to know what you are doing.”

Source: WDEL

 

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3 Tips to Pick the Best AED

3 Tips to Pick the Best AED

Julie Preiss – UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid & Safety (Certified AHA/MEDIC/ASHI Instructor)

 

Thinking of buying an AED? Not sure if you need to replace your existing AED?

If you are thinking about purchasing a new AED, or curious if you’re old AED needs to be replaced, you’re probably scratching your head trying to figure out which AED is best for you. Relax, we wrote this article to take the stress out of buying an AED and provide you with real world insights to help you make an informed decision to buy the right AED for you.

 

Let’s start off with a little background

Automated External Defibrillators, or AEDs, have been helping both first responders and ordinary individuals safely resuscitate SCA (Sudden Cardiac Arrest) victims and save lives without complex medical training. AEDs work by producing a small electrical charge that can reset a patient’s heart to its correct rhythm.

While easy-to-use portable defibrillators are only a few decades old, AEDs are so effective at saving lives that they’re estimated to increase SCA survival rates by a staggering 70%. Despite these statistics, many areas of the U.S. simply don’t have enough AEDs to go around. Experts estimate that an increase in AEDs to optimal levels could save more than 40,000 American lives each year – and that’s just one reason why it’s essential for more people to learn about and have access to this lifesaving device.

The latest guidelines from resuscitation councils are clear: successful defibrillation must be supported with high-quality CPR. If the AED’s first heart analysis calls for no shock, only high-quality CPR can lead to a shockable rhythm on the next heart analysis.

What to look for when purchasing an AED

Now we understand the role of an AED let’s take a look at 3 key factors you should take into consideration when purchasing an AED.

 

 

#1 Cost

Upfront Vs. Lifetime

One of the biggest mistakes we see when purchasing an AED is that buyers are looking at the upfront cost of the unit. However, not all AED’s are created equally. When considering purchasing a new or replacement AED it is important to look at “Lifetime ownership costs“. Typically we see most people own an AED for 10+ years, during that time you will replace batteries and pads several times. However, each manufacturer has a different life of their batteries and pads. So what may appear to be a more cost effective AED solution upfront, actually turns out to be more expensive over the lifetime of the AED as you may have to replace batteries and pads more frequently in some units.

 

#2 Quality Compression Feedback

Because you don’t always remember what you learned in class

Another important factor when selecting an AED is quality compression feedback, some AED’s have a very beneficial feature of providing real time feedback for compression depth and rates. Even though you learned CPR in class, having this live feedback during a SCA can be very helpful, after all having a little extra guidance can make the situation a little less stressful.

 

#3 Synchronized Expiration Dates

You dont want pads to expire while the battery still show’s good

Some AED’s have different life duration between pads and batteries. The problem here is that you will end up replacing pads while the battery is still good.

 

 

As many people would expect, the vast majority of AEDs (59%) in the U.S. are currently owned by first responders such as a policemen, firefighters, and EMTs. The next largest group of AED owners are schools (17%), followed by faith-based and recreational organizations, nursing homes and senior centers, and hospitals, clinics, and other medical centers. It’s a good idea to know the general places in which the equipment is most likely to be located, so, in case of emergency, you have a better shot at finding (or helping others to find) a nearby AED. In addition, if you or a loved one has a close family member with a heart condition, you may want to inquire about where the closest AED is, especially if traveling to remote or rural areas.

In the first 10 months after Chicago’s O’Hare Airport installed 49 AEDs on the premises, the devices were used 14 times, saving a total of nine lives – nearly 1 each month (and that’s only one airport). When it comes to helping an SCA victim, every second counts. According to statistics published by the American Heart Association, every additional minute AED use is delayed corresponds with a 10% reduction in patient survival rates. This means that in especially large areas or buildings, such as airports like O’Hare, it pays to have multiple AEDs located in different areas in order to facilitate easy access to the devices.

 

Which AED should we buy?

 

Our Pick

Zoll AED Plus – $1,699

The Zoll AED Plus is a great all round AED that provides the best value for money with key features such as Quality Compression Feedback and Synchronized Expiration Dates that will help anyone save a life, the big advantage with the Zoll AED Plus unit is the lower cost of ownership combined with great features.

Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $488 (batteries and pads)

Total cost of ownership for 10 years – $2,187 (Including AED unit)

 

What we like

DOES HAVE Quality Compression Feedback – says “push harder” also includes a built in metronome to ensure the rescuer is providing compressions at the correct rate. 

DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 5th year.

Easy battery replacement with  Duracell 123 Lithium Batteries available at many stores

 

What we don’t like 

Heavier than other AED’s

 

Final thoughts

From compression feedback, synchronized battery and pads expiration along to the fact you can use Duracell 123 Lithium batteries which are available at many stores, this is a robust, featured packed AED that we highly recommend.

Click here to learn more about the Zoll AED Plus

 

 

 

 

Runner-Up

HeartSine 450P AED – $1,595

The HeartSine 450P AED is a close second to the Zoll AED Plus, the 450P has quality compression feedback and synchronized expirations dates and is less expensive for total ownership versus the Zoll unit.

Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $352 (batteries and pads)

Total cost of ownership for 10 years is $1,947 (Including AED unit)

 

What we like 

DOES HAVE Quality Compression Feedback – Says “push faster” “push slower”

DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 4th year.

 

What we don’t like 

2 piece pad design – A little trickier to install pads versus a one piece pad design

Does Not have the ability to use off the shelf batteries

Final thoughts

The HeartSine 450 is a great AED, with compression feedback and synchronized expiration dates this is a solid AED. It’s a tad cheaper than the Zoll unit, just consider that the batteries are specialized and can’t be purchased at just any store. Also, the two piece pad design may be a little trickier for placement versus the one piece Zoll design.

Click here to learn more about the HeartSine 450

 

 

 

Budget Pick

HeartSine 350P AED – $1,225

Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $352  (batteries and pads)

Total cost of ownership for 10 years – $1,577 (Including AED unit)

Similar to the 450P with one major exception, the 350 does not have the quality compression feedback feature. The feedback feature can be a huge difference and something to be considered for your buying decision.

 

What we like 

DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 4th year.

 

What we don’t like 

DOES NOT HAVE Quality compression feedback

 

Final thoughts

The HeartSine 350P is a cost effective budget minded AED, a great unit for those that have a tight budget.

Click here to learn more about the HeartSine 350

 

 

Why you should trust me

I am a certified AHA/MEDIC/ASHI CPR Instructor working with companies/groups providing CPR Classes and AED’s to help save lives for the past 8 years.

 

Click here to learn about CPR Training

Sources

Zoll.com

Heartsine.com

 


Do We Really Need CPR Training?

Do we really need CPR Training?

Here are some statistics we feel make a pretty compelling case to get trained in CPR

 

* 900 Americans die every day from Sudden Cardiac Arrest

* 95% of victims die before reaching a hospital

* 4 minutes – Brain death starts to occur within 4 minutes

 

You can help save a life

 

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes June 14th – 18th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPR, AED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

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Hockey player alive today due to AED

It’s the second time in three years that an AED was used at the Piney Orchard Ice Arena to save a hockey players life.

On March 28, a player in the locker room went into sudden cardiac arrest. Players as well as an off-duty Paramedic began CPR and utilized and AED to deliver shocks to the man.

Authorities say the victim had a pulse and was breathing when paramedics arrived. The man was taken to a local hospital for treatment and was released and “joking with friends” the next day, the fire department’s blog said.

The AED was installed due to the initiative of a teenage hockey play and Boy Scout. He noticed that the arena didn’t have a AED.

“This is an example of how learning CPR can save a life. Whether a teammate, a friend, co-worker, loved one, or a complete stranger, starting CPR quickly increases the chance of survival,” says the fire department blog.

“According to the American Heart Association, CPR, especially if performed immediately, can double or triple a cardiac arrest victim’s chance of survival.”

 

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MTA conductor performs CPR on passenger

Pictured: Kevin Bartsch (Photo Courtesy of New York Post)
Pictured: Kevin Bartsch (Photo Courtesy of New York Post)

F-Train conductor, Kevin Bartsch was on a southbound train when passengers alerted him to an unconscious man.

“I found this gentleman slumped over on the bench, people were saying he’s dead,” Bartsch, 50, recalled. “I noticed his lips were blue. I checked for a carotid pulse. He did not have one.”

Bartsch performed CPR on the man while an EMT arrived on the scene with an AED.

The man returned to consciousness before the defibrillator was needed.

Passengers on the scene describe Bartsch as a hero.

Bartsch himself, was rather modest.

“When it all was going on, training mode took over,” he said. “I did what I had to do.”

”It hit me after, I just saved somebody and was up all night reflecting on it,” he said.

Source: New York Post


Ready To Learn CPR? Need Recertification?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes June 11th – 15th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPR, AED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

For more information;

Call 800.869.6970

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Publix employees honored for saving co-workers life

Photo Courtesy of CBS 12

Two Publix Employees, Christina Holbrook and Erika Serkin used a defibrillator on Jon Powell, a meat cutter at Publix West Palm when he collapsed at work.

“I’m just glad to be here and I really don’t know what else to say. I mean everybody else, so many people jumped in to help. I’m grateful for that,” Powell said.

Erika Serkin, the Publix store manager saw Powell on the floor when Christina rushed over to assist.

“I saw him on the floor, and Erika was there and she said something about CPR and it’s all kind of a blur from there, I just went into action and gave him CPR,” said Christina Holbrook, Publix grocery clerk.

“We applied the AED machine to him and you press a button on it and it tells you step by step what you need to do,” Serkin said.

Both woman are happy that they had the been trained to use the defibrillator.

“I’m happy that everything turned out the way it did,” Holbrook said.

Source: CBS12