Companies learning CPR reap the side benefit of team building

Learning CPR can not only help to save a life, but it can bring your company closer together.

 

Taking a four-hour CPR course with your co-workers can build trust and understanding among employees.

Everyone working together toward a common goal builds stronger working relationships and understanding amongst workers.

Articles like this one form the New York Times, show how putting individuals in a situation where each person is on a level playing field learning together creates unity.

“It breaks down divisions,” Richard Hough III, the chairman and chief executive of the Silvercrest Asset Management Group, said of the courses. “You could have the C.E.O. next to the receptionist. You’re on an equal plain.”

Many workplaces try various team building exercises. They take company outings, attend seminars, different retreats, or parties. Learning CPR however, really brings teams together. Good communication is key for Chain of Survival. Learning CPR and working as team forces good communication. Teams learn to trust one another and most important become a team with a single task to save a life.

Next time your thinking about a team building event, schedule a CPR class and make your team building fun, memorable and learn to save a life.

 

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First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes October 1st – 5th

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes October 1st – 5th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

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Tech companies are targeting heart disease

          

From apps that diagnose irregular heart rhythms to phone cases that claim to measure blood pressure, there has been a wave of technology promising to use our everyday devices — smartphones and wearables — to fight heart disease. But why heart health, and how much can these gadgets really do?

Heart disease is the most common cause of death in the world.

Heart disease is the most common cause of death around the world, according to the World Health Organization, so of course companies want to work on a problem that could have a huge impact, and bring in lots of money. Apple, for example, has launched a study to identify irregular heart rhythms with its Apple Watch. Plus, many sensors and wearables lend themselves particularly well to helping with cardiovascular problems, says Greg Marcus, a cardiologist at the University of California, San Francisco.

Tech companies will play a large role in advancing early detection for serious illness. Everything from Irregular heart beats, high blood pressure, to diabetes

Source: Angela Chen and Alessandra Potenza on the The Verge

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The Difference Between Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Heart attack – Why It Matters

Often times sudden cardiac arrest and heart attack are used synonymously. In truth the two are very different from one another.

Sudden cardiac arrest is when the heart malfunctions and suddenly stops beating. A heart attack is when blood flow to the heart is blocked.

In short a heart attack is about “circulation” and sudden cardiac arrest is an “electrical” problem.

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when a blocked artery prevents oxygen rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished begins to die. The longer a person goes without receiving treatment, greater damage will be done to the heart. Symptoms can occur almost immediately. Materializing as sharp pain in the chest, and may travel to the arm, shoulder and back. The symptoms may occur slowly over days or weeks prior to a heart attack. These symptoms often appear as shortness of breath or heartburn. Unlike with sudden cardiac arrest the heart usually doesn’t stop beating during a heart attack.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest occurs suddenly and very often without warning. It is when the heart abruptly begins to beat in an abnormal or irregular rhythm called (arrhythmia). Without organized electrical activity in the heart muscle, there is no consistent contraction of the ventricles, which results in the heart’s inability to generate an adequate cardiac output. With its pumping action disrupted, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Within seconds a person will lose consciousness and have no pulse. Death can occur within minutes if the victim does not receive immediate treatment.

Heart attacks do increase the risk for sudden cardiac arrest. Other heart conditions can also increase the likelihood for sudden cardiac arrest as well. These conditions include a thickened heart cardiomyopathyheart failure, arrhythmias, particularly ventricular fibrillation, and long Q-T syndrome.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

A cardiac arrest victim can be saved if treated immediately. First, **call 9-1-1 for emergency medical services. Then get a Defibrillator (AED) automated external defibrillator if one is available and use it as soon as it arrives. Begin CPR immediately and continue until professional emergency medical personnel arrive. If two people are available, one should begin CPR immediately while the other calls 9-1-1 and finds the Defibrillator .

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death

There are over 320,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. By performing Hands-Only CPR, you can double or even triple a victim’s chance of survival.

Learn CPR today! CPR Certification

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Are you ready to save a life? Learn CPR/First Aid

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

September 17th  – 21st

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

 

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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Man receives CPR at National High School Rodeo Finals

Emergency first responders and bystanders are being credited with saving a 72-year old mans life.

Witnesses the man complained of chest pains, before collapsing in the grandstands.

According to SCSO officials, bystanders began applying CPR, and emergency first responders revived the man by deploying an automated external defibrillator.

The man was conscious and alert as he was transported to the hospital.

Source: Oil City News

 

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Athletic trainers revive woman on the way to breakfast

Photo courtesy of CBS 4 Indy

Bonnie Howard and DeAnne Green were arriving for breakfast at the Sunrise Cafe in Fishers, IN. When they heard a woman scream across the parking lot, they immediately rushed over to help.

“All of a sudden the lady just went completely limp,” said Howard. “I couldn’t find a pulse, so I started doing chest compressions.”

Both Bonnie and DeAnne are athletic trainers at Community Health Network.

Bonnie began CPR while DeAnne called 9-1-1.

The woman was visiting the cafe with her husband and another woman who drove the couple. Emergency personnel arrived and transported the woman to Community Heart and Vascular Hospital.

“I think it’s crucial for everybody to know it because who knows what would have happened if we hadn’t have been there and couldn’t start that right away,” said Howard. “You only have a few seconds before things can start to shut down, so I think it’s very important that everybody know it, especially being an adult. Just doing chest compressions can save somebody’s life.”

Source: CBS4indy.com

 

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73-year-old saved with CPR

Lewis Family Drug pharmacist Lisa Thelen, left, meets Dennis Scott for the first time since he suffered cardiac arrest in the County Fair Food Store on Thursday afternoon. Scott suffered cardiac arrest back on Feb. 16 collapsing near the customer service counter where Thelen was one of the stores employees who rushed to Scott’s aid when he went to the floor. (Matt Gade / Republic)

Dennis Scott entered Lewis Family Drug on Feb. 16 and collapsed near the customer service counter suffering from Cardiac Arrest.

Elimae Stubbe noticed Scott was very pale. When Scott suddenly collapsed. She immediately began compressions.

“He was very pale, and the look on his face was like someone was going to have a heart attack.”

She leapt.

“My instincts kicked in,” Stubbe said.

She had performed CPR once before on a family member. She since let her certification expire.

“I just did compressions,” Stubbe said. “Lisa from Lewis Drug did compressions and gave mouth-to-mouth.”

Scott said of the incident:

“I woke up with a second life,” he said. In gratitude, “I’d maybe like to contribute, give back, a little more.”

Source: The Daily Republic

 

 

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Runner’s life saved by CPR

Shortly after finishing his race, Andy Martin collapsed due to a heart attack.

Ryan Sanders who is an athletic trainer and a Furman University police officer, preformed CPR and used an AED to save Andy Martin’s life.

“You go to the mall and something happens you might be the person walking by, and AEDs walk you through what to do so I just urge people to grab it and it will tell you what you need to do,” Sanders said.

Source: WSPA

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How Hit Songs Are Helping Save Lives, One Beat At a time.

In an effort to help train first responders in hands-only CPR, New York Presbyterian Hospital has released a 40-song playlist whose beats per minute match the number of chest compressions.

Most people are familiar with The Bee Gees’ 1977 hit – and aptly named – Stayin’ Alive which took the number one spot.

Artists from Beyoncé to Justin Timberlake to ABBA also had songs on the set list.

Bee Gees
Bee Gees

On a 40-track playlist released by New York Presbyterian Hospital, Stayin’ Alive by the Bee Gees came out as the best song to perform CPR to.

TOP 10 SONGS FOR SAVING LIVES

  1. Stayin’ Alive – Bee Gees
  2. Cecilia – Simon and Garfunkel
  3. Hard to Handle – The Black Crowes
  4. Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  5. Rock Your Body – Justin Timberlake
  6. I Will Survive – Gloria Gaynor
  7. MMMBop – Hanson
  8. Gives You Hell – The All-American Rejects
  9. Heartbreaker – Mariah Carey ft Jay Z
  10. Another One Bites the Dust – Queen

Stayin’ Alive, the disco hit made popular by the movie Saturday Night Fever, has a rhythm of 103 beats per minute.

This is close to the recommended rate of at least 100 chest compressions per 60 seconds that should be delivered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Additionally, doctors say, the song is well known enough to be useful in teaching the general public to effectively perform the lifesaving maneuver.

The 40-song list, which has a duration rate of two hours and 28 minutes of CPR jams, also includes songs like ABBA’s Dancing Queen and Beyoncé’s Crazy in Love.

Pop fans can enjoy tracks from Missy Elliot and Justin Timberlake, while alt-rock aficionados can choose from Fall Out Boy or the All-American Rejects.

Despite the number of times CPR ‘saves’ someone’s life on TV, it has an abysmal success rate in real life.

Only about eight percent of CPR patients are saved by the procedure, even when backup help is called immediately.

Those who’ve had to be saved with CPR are likely to experience other painful injuries, as well, such as crushed or ruptured organs.

However, performing CPR more than doubles the survival rate of patients who go into cardiac arrest.

 

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