Group CPR Classes & Group First Aid Classes – Is your team CPR ready to save a life?

Group CPR Classes & Group First Aid Classes

 Anyone can learn CPR, is your firm ready to save a life? #cprreadytosavealife

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Now available online (with in-person skills checks)

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

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Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work? Increase Your Survival Rates

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

Click here to learn more about choosing the right AED for your business

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

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Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

 


It’s Never Too Late To Learn – First Aid/CPR Classes for Groups & Corporations

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

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It’s National CPR/AED awareness week – Here’s one thing you can do to help save a life

This week is CPR/AED awareness week – How can you make a difference?

When cardiac arrest occurs outside of the hospital, survival depends on immediate CPR, and unfortunately, almost 90% of people who suffer cardiac arrests die, according to AHA statistics.

This week commemorating CPR and AED education marks the perfect time to make sure employees know how easy CPR technique can be, and where the nearest AED is. In addition to the life-saving skills learned, A CPR class is a great team building opportunity.

 

Less than a third of cardiac arrest victims receive CPR, according to the AHA, because most bystanders feel helpless and worry that their efforts may actually make the situation worse. The fact of the matter is, CPR, especially if performed in the first few minutes of cardiac arrest, can increase a person’s chance of survival by two or even three times.

The thought of giving mouth-to-mouth to a coworker may be daunting, but it’s no longer necessary. Hands-Only CPR may help save lives until paramedics arrive, and it doesn’t involve mouth-to-mouth. There are only two steps; if you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, call 911 and push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of any tune that is 100 to 120 beats per minute.

The one thing you could do right now?  Schedule a class for you and your team – Learn CPR.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Click Here for WebChat

 

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Risks of performing CPR – What you need to know.

The American Heart Association consistently supports and promotes CPR classes for people not in the medical profession—so when someone has a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital or medical facility, there will be a higher chance of a bystander stepping in to perform lifesaving CPR while the victim waits for emergency response teams to arrive.

Studies show that brain death begins within four to six minutes after a cardiac arrest, and those who do not get CPR within that time are extremely likely not to survive. Getting CPR immediately—and if you’re not in a hospital, that usually means from a bystander—could mean the difference between life and death.

First, whether or not you can be sued will vary depending on where you are and who you are. The 2000 Federal Cardiac Arrest Survival Act grants those who administer CPR or use an AED immunity from civil charges, except in instances of willful misconduct or gross negligence.

Good Samaritan laws exist on a state-by-state basis. Mostly, they provide at least some protection for those who perform CPR or use an AED. Some states actually require you to step in if you know CPR or, in some cases, if you are a medical professional. In Vermont, for instance, requires bystanders to give “reasonable assistance” or face a $100 fine.

Generally, however, Good Samaritan Laws are there to protect bystanders who perform CPR. Mostly, you are required to ask permission before performing CPR if a person is not already in your care. If they cannot reply, then consent is implied.

You will not be protected by Good Samaritan laws if you try to go outside your area of training—if you try to perform an impromptu tracheotomy to save a choking victim, for example, and you are not a trained surgeon. If your behavior has been judged to be reckless or negligent, or if you leave the victim after initially providing care, you could also be sued.

If someone has a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order that specifies lifesaving care must not be provided in case of a sudden cardiac arrest or another health crisis, you must do as it says and avoid giving CPR—if you know about it. If you didn’t know about it, you generally can’t be prosecuted for giving lifesaving CPR anyway. But what about first aid? Medical professionals and lay-rescuers often ask if they can be sued for first aid? Generally, the answer is the same, you can’t be prosecuted for giving first aid to someone in need and you are not required to do so if you feel uncomfortable about it. Be sure to practice good faith and common sense if you ever end up in a situation where someone might need CPR or first aid.

Medical professionals who give CPR to people with a DNR order can potentially be in trouble—if they know about the DNR. The issue of giving CPR to someone with a DNR is complicated, however. In some states, DNR orders are only valid inside a hospital setting; outside the hospital, they do not apply. This means that an emergency response team can legally give someone CPR even if they have a DNR order. In other states, however, emergency medical responders are allowed to abide by DNR orders when responding to emergency calls in the victim’s home.

In addition, in some states, patients who move from one healthcare facility to another are required to tell their medical teams about the DNR.  Usually, medical professionals are not required to abide by a DNR order they do not know about.

The truth is that you can be sued for anything, at any time. The question is not whether you can be sued for performing CPR; the question is whether you can be successfully sued. The answer in most cases is no; Good Samaritan laws in most states protect bystanders from legal consequences if they act prudently and in keeping with their training. Hopefully, widely publicized cases of people being refused CPR will not keep non-medical citizens from getting certified for CPR—and providing lifesaving care if it is required.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

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CPR/First Aid Training – Now available online

Anyone can learn CPR, is your team ready to save a life?

UniFirst First Aid + Safety/UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, our CPRAED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees on how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

Can we take the course online?

Absolutely! You can now take your class online, this allows for more flexibility for your schedule and also provides an alternative option to reduce in-person class time. After students pass the online portion we will come to your location to conduct “Skills Checks” which takes typically less than an hour for up to 10 students, we follow the CDC and AHA COVID-19 guidelines and will adhere to any specific requirements you may have beyond the CDC and AHA guidelines.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety/UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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Firefighter knows the value of an AED firsthand

Les Morgan knows because his life was saved by the quick response of those around him Feb. 18. The 60-year-old firefighter with Schuylkill Hose Company No. 2 and borough resident responded to smoke in a structure and was handing his son, who is also a firefighter, a fire extinguisher when suddenly he was on the floor not breathing normally.

Les Morgan was suffering a cardiac arrest

EMS, firefighters and Schuylkill Haven Police Department officers all had a hand in saving Les Morgan. Kyle Morgan didn’t know everyone who helped save his father’s life, but trusted they knew what to do while he waited outside.

“He was down for less than two minutes,” Morgan said.

Within that time, 90 seconds of CPR was given and Morgan was shocked with the AED, which reads your heart rhythm and determines if a shock is needed. It then gives procedural instructions.

“A lot of people are afraid they are going to hurt someone,” by using the AED, Kyle Morgan said.

Every minute CPR is not given, the survival rate drops by 10 percent, according to the AHA.

About 70 percent of sudden cardiac arrests occur at home, while the remainder occur in public settings and nursing homes, according to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

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Source: Standard-Speaker


It’s Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month – Learn CPR

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Over 300,000 Americans die every year from Sudden Cardiac Arrest, be sure your company has first responders trained and ready to help save a life.

We make it easy! UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

 

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Post-Dispatch’s Goold helps save man’s life at Busch Stadium

Before he chronicled the Cardinals’ first division title-clinching since 2015, Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold helped save a man’s life Sunday at Busch Stadium.

St. Louis-based videographer Mike Flanary, 64, collapsed in the Cubs’ dugout before the game and was briefly without a pulse before CPR was performed by Goold, a longtime former lifeguard and Eagle Scout trained in CPR. After receiving further medical attention from the Cubs’ training staff and then emergency medical personnel, Flanary was transferred to Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Medical officials said Flanary, who was working for a Chicago television affiliate for Sunday’s game, was in “critical but stable” condition after suffering a heart attack and then a stroke.

Cardinals’ security director Phil Melcher, asked about Goold’s immediate assistance, said it was “huge. You cannot discount that, at all. I absolutely thanked him.”

Washington University’s Dr. David Tan, the stadium doctor on duty Sunday at Busch, said, “So many people are afraid of doing CPR. But, because of (Goold’s) actions, he was the first link in that chain of survival.

“It’s fabulous. It was the early CPR by Derrick Goold that probably saved his life. Derrick wasn’t afraid. He didn’t hesitate. And he did it.

“In the medical field, when you save somebody like this, they call it a clinical save. This is a clinical save that was started by Derrick Goold. Period.”

Bill Hayes, a registered nurse who was on duty as a supervisor, said, “Somebody said, ‘Does somebody know CPR? And Derrick said, ‘I do.’

Goold had just entered the dugout area just before the Cubs were to announce the dismissal of Joe Maddon as manager.

 

Schedule Your CPR Class Now

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

 

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Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work?

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

Click here to learn more about choosing the right AED for your business

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinfacebook  

 

Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

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