OSHA Raises Employer Penalties for 2019

OSHA Raises Employer Penalties for 2019

The penalty increases apply to federal OSHA states.

The penalties levied against employers for safety violations by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have gone up, effective Jan. 24. The increases only apply to citations issued after that date and for the remainder of 2019.

The 2019 penalties are:

·        Other than Serious violations, $13,260 (up from $12,675 in 2018);

·        Serious violations, $13,260 (up from $12,675);

·        Repeat violations: $132,598, (up from $126,749);

·        Willful violations, $132,598 (up from $126,749);

·        Failure to abate (per day), $13,260 (up from $12,675 last year).

The penalty increases apply to federal OSHA states. Nonetheless, OSHA expects that the 26 states operating their own occupational safety and health programs will align penalty structures with federal OSHA so that such programs are equally effective.

“While this is OSHA’s expectation there has been little adjustment from various state plans to align with the increase in penalties,” notes Tressi L. Cordaro, an attorney with the law firm of Jackson Lewis PC. “For example, North Carolina and Kentucky still maintain a $7,000 maximum fine for serious violations and $70,000 for willful or repeats.”

In the future, DOL is required to adjust maximum OSHA penalties for inflation by January 15 of each new year.

Source: https://www.ehstoday.com/standards/osha-raises-employer-penalties-2019

 

Call Now

Shop Now

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


Five Safety Tips that Impact Business

Follow these tips to create and maintain a strong safety culture that engages employees as part of the process.

It’s easy to turn a blind eye to safety when working in fast-paced environments and having to meet project deadlines. However, most manufacturing employers can attest to the turbulent outcomes that can arise if safety standards are not regularly enforced. Our everyday actions can have an impact on cost and productivity. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2,000 eye injuries occur every day in the workplace, costing more than $300 million in lost production time, medical expenses and worker compensation.

It’s clear that many companies are failing workers with insufficient safety programs and injury prevention plans. However, employers have the opportunity to turn this situation around with a few changes. Protecting employees doesn’t mean your organization has to start from square one. It does, however, require you to create a strong safety culture and open communication channels so employees can collaborate when it comes to hazard identification and problem-solving.

Here are five tips that operations managers, site managers, and safety coaches can use to start that dialogue:

1. Start from the top. Developing a healthy safety culture requires leadership to champion safety as a key organizational value. The company culture must include leading, working, and acting safely. When management leads in safety, the organization will follow.

2. Distribute safety surveys. When executing on your safety culture, it’s important to first find out what your employees know about your safety guidelines and expectations. Are they familiar with your corporate policies and procedures? Do they even know their own responsibilities when it comes to safety? This survey also serves as a great opportunity to get anonymous feedback on employees’ perceptions about safety in your workplace.

3. Conduct pre-shift huddles. This is a time when management can reinforce the safety culture by covering near-injury misses, newly identified hazards and educating staff on how proper processes and equipment handling can protect everyone’s health and safety. The goal of safety huddles is to also provide an open, non-punitive forum for employees to communicate about workplace safety.

4. One-on-one discussions. Supervisors can build trust and show respect for their workers’ safety by engaging associates in informal safety discussions. Associates who know that their opinions and perspectives are valued will be more likely to participate in informal communication about safety practices. This is also an ideal setting to gain feedback from employees who may not be comfortable bringing up concerns in front of a large group.

5. Perform ongoing safety training. Providing safety training for employees is essential for creating a culture of workplace safety. A workforce with a strong understanding of safety guidelines and best practices is more likely to recognize potential hazards before they occur. This can lead to fewer injuries and help you avoid costly losses in productivity and employee morale.

Some of the benefits of a safer and more engaged workforce include:

●       reduced workers’ compensation costs, lower medical expenses and improved productivity.

●       improved safety as a result of clear and repeatable processes for identifying and addressing hazards and injury threats.

●       stronger employer branding and positive outside perspective of the organization.

Impact on Employer Branding

Workplace safety should begin and end not only with workers in mind but with workers being engaged—actively participating and driving safety programs forward. High levels of employee engagement have also been correlated with greater productivity, quality, and profitability, as well as reduced turnover rates. It can also contribute to improved employee retention, and it even has the ability to impact recruiting, since job seekers will be able to learn about your culture of safety through online reviews. In today’s world, job seekers look to current and former employees’ experience to decide whether or not they want to work for a company.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Safety Specialist

Click Here to learn more about Safety Training

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us

 

Source: https://www.ehstoday.com/safety/five-safety-tips-impact-business


Small Business – Training Best Practices

Training in the workplace

Just like large organizations, small businesses also need to ensure their employees are appropriately trained to succeed at their jobs. Not to mention the business’s obligations to stay current with any training requirements mandated by OSHA and other regulatory bodies.

Without the big labor pools to cover missed shifts and the larger budgets of a big company, what are the best ways for small businesses and startups to get their employees the training they need while minimizing lost time and keeping costs down?

Small Business Trends offers several tips for training small business employees, and the number one solution is to use online training options. Sometimes, those options might even be at no charge. For example, if your organization uses a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) application, does that provider offer any webinars or tutorials on how to use the features of the app? Spending 30 minutes listening to a recorded class is less time consuming than traveling to a workshop or taking a weekly course at the local community college, and those vendor-provided courses might be free and included in the CRM contract.

 

When a freebie isn’t quite enough, there’s a whole world of online training opportunities out there, the result of a growing market demand as more and more companies see the benefits of this convenient training solution. Some online training providers even specialize in solutions for small businesses such as UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid & Safety.

The Small Business Association blog also suggests tips for training, including:

  • Join Associations or Trade Groups – Check out your trade association(s) website or newsletter for training opportunities that may be included in your membership.
  • Cross-Train Employees in the Workplace – Different jobs in your organization [can be] hands-on training opportunities for others. Give employees new roles or responsibilities. Have them shadow someone who is already doing these tasks for a few days, until they are ready to try the new role on their own. Rotate roles frequently so your employees are continuously learning and challenged to achieve new things
  • Start a Mentorship Program – Consider partnering new or less experienced employees with mentors. For example, an up-and-coming sales rep might benefit from sitting in on sales planning sessions or attending important off-site customer meetings with a more senior employee.

 

In addition to fulfilling compliance requirements, training your employees makes good business sense, too. According to an article at Forbes.com, “Small business owners who invest in training are more likely to report growing, and more likely to report growing more. In other words, what is good for employees is good for the business,” and that “‘Hiring and retaining good employees closely follows ‘finding and keeping customers’ as the top two challenges reported by small business owners who are committed to growing their businesses.”

So, before you lose a day’s productivity because your team is driving back and forth from yet another seminar at a distant hotel, have a look around online. The topic you need might already have a robust online solution.

Set your team and your business up for success with the training solutions from UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid & Safety. From emergency care to first responders to workplace safety for companies big and small, let us help you meet your training goals and keep your company in compliance.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety Specialist

Click Here to learn more about Safety Training

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinfacebook  


Fire Safety Month: Plan, Prevent, Train & Recover

Fire safety is taught and practiced from the earliest days of kindergarten—we all remember “Stop, Drop, and Roll”—but preparedness training should never end. Workplace fires pose a risk across all industries, making fire safety training and policies an essential part of keeping employees, customers, and the surrounding community safe.

According to OSHA,workplace fires and explosions kill 200 and injure more than 5,000 workers each year, costing businesses more than $2.3 billion in property damage. Explosions and fires account for 3 percent of workplace injuries and have the highest casualty rate of all probable workplace accidents. Many unexpected explosions and fires are due to faulty gas lines, poor pipefitting, improperly stored combustible materials, or open flames.

Taking preventative steps, implementing training, and drilling simulation exercises can lower risk and prepare employees in case a fire ever does break out in the workplace.

 

Preventative Steps
According to Safety Services Company,2 only 15 percent of fires are a result of circumstances outside of human control. Most workplace fires can be prevented, and there are preventative steps every organization can take to mitigate the risk.

Begin by performing a workplace hazard assessment. Walk through the building or work environment, document any fire hazards, and make sure there is full accessibility to things such as electrical control panels, emergency exits, firefighting equipment, and sprinklers. Test smoke alarms and check fire extinguishers for expiration dates.

Because electricity accounts for 39 percent of workplace fires, keep a close eye out for any electrical hazards, such as faulty wiring and malfunctioning electrical equipment. Make sure electrical cords are in good condition and power outlets are not overloaded. Replace anything that appears overheated, smells strange or has frayed or exposed wires.

 

Hazard Communication

If your organization uses chemicals or other hazardous materials, read labels to ensure you are storing and disposing of them properly in appropriate containers with adequate ventilation. Fire hazards such as oily rags should be discarded in a covered metal container and emptied on a regular basis. Chemicals should be handled with proper protective equipment and separated from flammable materials.

Walking through your building and pinpointing possible fire hazards allows you to fix issues before they become problems. Once hazards are identified, taking action to quickly fix them and address safety processes will go a long way toward reducing the likelihood of a fire.

 

Disaster Plan Development 
Fires are unexpected and unpredictable. While prevention can lower risk, accidents do still happen. In order to prepare for the worst, organizations must develop an effective disaster response plan to minimize fire damage and prepare employees. Every business is different and must customize its response plan to fit the facility and its employees, but there are common elements that all plans should include.

A disaster response plan is developed to guide organizations through a crisis event, such as a fire, and helps them resume operations afterwards. The plan should include an annual review of your organization’s overall fire safety procedures and best practices for addressing any hazards found.

Planning also should focus on the evacuation process and method for reporting fires. Make sure emergency exits are clearly labeled and accessible; posting emergency exit routes throughout the building will help people calmly navigate an anxious situation. Likewise, educating employees on the plan will keep them well informed and prepared to evacuate if necessary. Designating a meeting area allows volunteer team leaders to take roll call, confirm everyone is accounted for, and report any missing employees to first responders. The plan also should contain personal information about your employees, including phone numbers and next of kin contacts.

Finally, the disaster response plan should be easily accessible and understood by all levels of staff. It is a living document that requires frequent review and regular updates, so ongoing training is critical. Developing a flexible plan that is easy for employees to understand helps keep everyone safe, ultimately improving the resilience of everyone within the organization.

 

Train to Improve Resiliency
Assembling a disaster response team comprised of multiple departments from the organization guarantees the entire business is involved in the process of plan development and training. The response team should designate roles and responsibilities to all personnel. Make sure each employee knows his or her roles and responsibilities and understands the different aspects of the response plan.

Take time to discuss the specific hazards within your organization, such as flammable materials, toxic chemicals, radioactive sources, or water-reactive substances, as well as the protective actions employees can take should they come in contact with said hazards. Be sure employees know who their team leaders are and clearly communicate who is in charge during an emergency to minimize confusion. Include updated response plan procedures in orientation programs to keep all employees on the same page and prepare them to remain calm during an emergency.

Depending on the size of your organization, you may want to take the time to train employees on how to use a fire extinguisher or execute first aid procedures. Once everyone is properly trained, knows their responsibilities and understands the disaster response plan, hold a practice drill involving the entire organization. After each drill, gather the teams and evaluate the effectiveness of the drill and specify any areas that need improvement. Hold regular practice drills to continuously improve the evacuation process and fix any holes in the plan. As a result, the resiliency of the whole organization will be improved.

After a fire, a business still needs to maintain operations even though the physical location may be compromised. The disaster response plan should detail actions that need to be taken after the fire to enable the company to continue maintaining critical operations. Begin by detailing the organization’s functions, services, and who is being served to determine the kind of temporary space the business will need to occupy during the recovery process. If equipment is needed to carry out job functions, have a plan to access the equipment and make arrangements to set up an alternative workspace. Setting up remote access so employees can work from home is another viable option for certain industries.

 

Seeking Third-Party Services
Disaster planning, training, and recovery management can be a draining process for organizational leaders. Seeking help from a third-party service provider can alleviate the stress and take the burden off your company. A third-party service provider can help design a disaster response plan to fit your organizational needs and structure training sessions that prepare the entire workforce for crises. Engaging outside expertise also helps to identify things your organization may have missed and guides the development of drills that will make fire safety second nature for employees.

In addition to keeping your organization resilient, your employees may need help recovering, too. Surviving a fire can be a traumatic event that leaves a lasting impact. Employers should provide the option of an employee assistance program, or EAP, to help staff adjust back to their daily routines after a life-changing event. EAP services provide access to counseling, management consultation, and local resources to ensure employees are supported after a fire or other crisis.

Organizations across all industries must be prepared for the threat of fire. Preventative steps, designing the right disaster response plan, and implementing regular training sessions and drills will help mitigate the risk of a fire and keep your employees safe.

 

Call Now to speak with a specialist about Fire Safety Training and our Fire Safety Month training “Special”

Click Here to learn more about onsite Fire safety training

Click Here for Chat

 

Follow us:

 linkedin Follow us    facebook like us

 

Source: https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2019/05/01/Fire-Safety-Plan-Prevent-Train-Recover.aspx?admgarea=ht.FireSafety&Page=1

 

 


This week is Safe + Sound Week, Are you onboard?

Join us for Safe + Sound Week, August 10th-16th, 2020

What Is Safe + Sound Week?
A nationwide event to raise awareness and understanding of the value of safety and health programs that include management leadership, worker participation, and a systematic approach to finding and fixing hazards in workplaces.

Why Participate?
Safe workplaces are sound businesses. Successful safety and health programs can proactively identify and manage workplace hazards before they cause injury or illness, improving sustainability and the bottom line. Participating in Safe + Sound Week can help get your program started or energize an existing one.

Who Is Encouraged to Participate?
Organizations of any size or in any industry looking for an opportunity to show their commitment to safety to workers, customers, the public, or supply chain partners should participate.

How to Participate
Participating in Safe + Sound Week is easy. To get started, select the activities you would like to do at your workplace. You can host an event just for your workers or host a public event to engage your community. Examples of potential activities and tools to help you plan and promote your events are available. After you’ve completed your events, you can download a certificate and web badge to recognize your organization and your workers.

https://www.osha.gov/safeandsoundweek/

Click Here to learn about Safety Training

Click Here for Chat

 

Follow us:

linkedinfacebook  

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 2 (Performing Inspections)

5 elements of forklift safety – Part 2

Performing checkups

Operators are urged to inspect forklifts before each job, checking first the items that can be monitored without the engine running. Checkpoints should include seat belts, tires, lights, horns, brakes, backup alarms, and fluid levels, as well as the moving and load-supporting parts of the forklift.

Kertzman said his agency commonly issues citations to companies that neglect to maintain forklifts in good working condition.

“It’s low-hanging fruit to have a beat-up truck sitting out there that any inspector can spot half a dozen things wrong with it from 40 feet away,” Kertzman said.

The Washington L&I citation process involves discussing the area(s) of code violation, explaining to the employer how the organization failed to comply, and offering possible methods to resolve the issue.

“Then the employer is ultimately on the hook to decide what they’re going to do, and then make those changes in a timely fashion,” Kertzman said.

 

When to Perform Inspections

Whether it’s in a warehouse or outside, there are a few precautions you must take before you actually operate the lift. Your pre-shift checklist is one of the most important things you learn about during forklift safety training. Here is what these inspections entail.

When you go through forklift safety training, you’re taught that forklift safety inspections should be performed before every single shift. This does not mean that one safety inspection per day is all that is required. If there are multiple shifts per day, each operator must perform an inspection before their shift begins. This ensures the safety of the operator and everyone working in the space around them. These pre-shift checks can also help to prevent warehouse accidents that may damage goods or products. There are two types of pre-shift checks that must be done: a visual check and an operational pre-use check.

forklift training nj

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visual Check

The visual check is to be done before you start the forklift. During this check, you are going over the general condition of the forklift:

  • Tires: Check tires for any noticeable damages like cuts or gouges. Ensure the tire pressure is at the optimum level for pneumatic tires.
  • Fluid Levels: Make sure that all fluid levels including oil, fuel, or water are where they need to be.
  • Battery: Ensure the battery is fully charged. Check for exposed wires or loose cable connectors.
  • Forks and Mast: Check for any physical damage to the forks or mast of the forklift including bends or cracks.
  • Seatbelt: Every sit-down forklift needs a seatbelt. Make sure it is working and there are no rips or tears.

Operational Pre-Use Check

The operational pre-use check is to be conducted when you turn the forklift on, before operating the lift. This check should include:

  • Lights: Ensure that both the headlights and warning lights are operational.
  • Horn: Test the horn to make sure it is loud and clear.
  • Hydraulic Hoses: Check to make sure they are secured.
  • Hour Meter & Gauges: Check to see if meters and gauges are working correctly.
  • Brakes: Check the breaks to ensure they stop the lift smoothly. Test the parking brake to see if it can hold against a slight acceleration. Double-check the handbrake to make sure it is operational.
  • Hydraulic Controls: Ensure both the lift mechanism and tilt mechanism are operating smoothly by raising the forks all the way up and all the way back down, as well as tilting the mast all the way forward and then back again.
  • Steering: Turn the wheel to the left and to the right, making sure the wheels of the lift respond correctly.
  • Unusual Noises: Listen for abnormal sounds coming from the forklift.

If any issues are found during these pre-shift checks, they must be reported and the forklift in question must be taken out of commission until the issues are resolved.

Click Here to learn about our easy to use Forklift checklist

forklift training near me

Workplace Check

Before you start operating the lift truck, you should always do a workplace check as well. A workplace inspection ensures that your work environment is clear of any obstructions and safe for operation. During this check, you should keep these things in mind:

  • Ground Conditions: Make sure you’re aware of the ground conditions in the warehouse. Look out for any slopes, spills that cause the floor to be slippery, or ledges that could get in the way of the lift or cause it to tip over.
  • Overhead Obstructions: Ensure that there are no overhead obstructions low enough to impede the forklift or the load being carried.
  • Personnel: Be aware of how many people are currently working in the warehouse and know where they are at all times while operating the lift.
  • Machinery: Always be aware of other forklifts operating in the same space or any other machinery that is being used during your shift.

Click Here to learn about our easy to use Forklift checklist

Forklift Safety Training for Your Business

OSHA requires that these safety checks be conducted on every forklift before every single shift. These checks ensure the safety of the operators and those working around them. OSHA can and will request proof of inspections for up to four years prior. Because of this, it is recommended that you keep a good record of inspection sheets along with any corresponding repairs that were made. This way OSHA and insurance companies will know repairs were made as soon as a machine broke down. For forklifts that do not pass these inspections for any reason, it is crucial that repairs are done as soon as possible. Every company that uses forklifts in its daily operations needs to have an official checklist policy to ensure consistency and safety at all times.

Stay tuned for Part – 3 “Know the machinery and the rules”.

Click Here to learn about our easy to use Forklift checklist

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety Training Specialist

Click Here for Safety Training Courses

 

Be sure to follow us:

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us

 

Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety

Source: https://cnclifttruck.com/forklift-safety-training-inspections/


Attorneys: Lockout/tag-out violations are costly OSHA violations

Columbus, Ohio — OSHA is hitting hard at the issue of lockout/tag-out and machine safety guarding and putting a laser focus on amputations that could result from failure to disconnect all energy before servicing and maintenance of industrial machines.

That was the message from two lawyers who spoke at the Environmental Health and Safety Summit.

“When do most often amputations occur? When someone forgot to lockout/tag-out and when there’s a lack of a guard. That’s when you’re going to see an amputation,” said Nelva Smith, of the Steptoe & Johnson law firm.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration revised its reporting rule on Jan. 1, 2015, so employers now must report within 24 hours any amputation injury, even if there is no loss of bone, as well as eye injuries and all in-patient hospitalizations. OSHA kept its ongoing rule that fatalities must be reported within eight hours.

Smith said OSHA is increasing fines every year for amputations.

“Now you can go up to $139,000 for a maximum for a willful and a repeat [violations],” she said. “So you can easily get one citation for $139,000. Imagine if you got five citations? How much is that? Over a half-million dollars. And again, there’s a pattern. They’re really hitting the lockout/tag-out and machine guarding.”

Plastics machinery, such as injection molding machinery, can cause serious injuries from pinching and crushing, especially in the mold clamping area.

“It’s to prevent serious injury or death. You should be aware of the standard and what your requirements are under the standard,” Smith said.

OSHA defines “amputation” broadly and is stricter than workers’ compensation, according to William Wahoff, a lawyer at the firm. “If it is the tip of the finger without any bone damaged, you still have to report it for OSHA.”

And Wahoff said amputations are likely to lead to OSHA inspections: 65 percent of reported amputations resulted in inspections, compared with in-patient hospitalizations, which lead to inspections in around 35-40 percent of the cases.

Smith and Wahoff gave an hour-long presentation about lockout/tag-out and machine guarding during the health and safety conference, held July 18-19 in Columbus. Both lawyers are based in Columbus.

OSHA uses the term “control of hazardous energy,” for what’s commonly called lockout/tag-out, Smith said, covering sources of energy such as electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical and thermal.

“Why do we need to do it? Because during the servicing and maintenance of these machines and equipment, that’s where the injuries do occur, more often than not,” Smith said. “The unexpected startup or release of stored energy will usually result in a serious injury or death. Usually these are very complicated big machines, with a lot of working parts, a lot of sharp edges and pinch-points and that sort of thing. And if you’ve got a maintenance person working on a machine and a fellow employee doesn’t know it’s not locked out and just says, ‘Oh, I’m gonna hit the start button; I don’t see anybody.’ This is where it happens.”

Smith and Wahoff said manufacturers must have an energy control program and specific procedures for each machine. They recommend posting the step-by-step procedure for lockout/tag-out right on the machine, making it visible for employees and OSHA inspectors. OSHA will ask about the hazardous energy policy, even if they are on-site for another type of complaint, the lawyers said.

Wahoff said that companies train plant employees and maintenance staff; they should use OSHA’s hazardous energy control terminology, at least part of the time, so they know the right wording when an inspector questions the workers.

Smith added that the person who puts the lock tag on the machine must be the one who takes it off when the work is completed.

What about during “normal production”? Smith said that is not covered by lockout/tag-out.

“The problem we run into is, can we argue certain things are normal production and I don’t have to lockout/tag-out, because it can be a very complicated procedure to disconnect all of the sources of energy,” she said. Minor tool changes and adjustments and other minor servicing activities are OK, “if it’s routine, it’s repetitive and integral to the use of the machine, and you use alternative measures to protect that employee,” Smith said.

But Wahoff said OSHA does not consider the setup of dies to be “normal operation.”

Smith laid out the way to think about it: “If you want to make an exception to the lockout/tag-out procedure, am I putting an employee in a zone of danger? Are they having to put themselves in a machine? Are we having to bypass a guard? Is that really ‘normal production’?”

 


Man makes ‘miracle’ recovery from heart attack after strangers perform CPR

On July 23, building contractor Brian Boos, JDW, Inc. service repair supervisor Darren Ebaugh and FerrelGas technician Shawn Kainz were all called to a home in rural Oak Creek to fix a family’s furnace. The three men say they have crossed paths on job sites before but were essentially strangers. They didn’t even know each other’s names.

“Everything was meant to be. It was one of those days. One of those moments that everything was meant to be,” Boos told FOX31.

Upon arriving to the job site, Kainz began complaining of chest pains. He told Boos and Ebaugh that he planned to see a doctor after finishing the work on the furnace regulator.

“I felt like I had heartburn. That’s all I remember,” Kainz said.

Ebaugh was putting his tools in his truck while Boos and Kainz stood together outside the home. That’s when Kainz collapsed.

“He didn’t grab his chest. He didn’t say, ‘Oh no.’ He just turned and [fell],” Boos said.

Boos attempted to call 911 and despite having an extremely weak signal in the rural area, he was able to connect with emergency dispatch. They helped talk Ebaugh and Boos through nearly 15 minutes of CPR until paramedics arrived.

“Just looking at his eyes, his eyes were glazed over. From being a hunter, I’ve seen it a lot and I knew what it meant. He was gone,” Ebaugh said.

“For sure there was no life,” Boos said.

The two never stopped CPR.

“The bystander CPR saved him. They kept him alive until we could get here,” Oak Creek Fire EMS supervisor Angela Bracegirdle told FOX31.

She has been with the department for 19 years. In that time, she says often bystanders will give up on CPR after about two minutes, if they even step in to help at all.

“Just keep going. Don’t stop. Because you never know,” Bracegirdle said.

Bracegirdle and her team were able to get Kainz’s heart restarted and he began breathing on his own before he was loaded into an ambulance. On the way to the hospital, she says he went into cardiac arrest again and regained a pulse after they used an AED (automatic electronic defibrillator) on him.

“It was a widow maker,” Kainz told FOX31. “It was 100-percent clogged coronary artery on the top right.”

He spent less than a week in the hospital before being released. He is now recovering and those around him say his progress is a miracle.

“Monday, [I got] the call, ‘He wants to have dinner with you.’ It just blew me away. I never would have imaged he survived,” Ebaugh said.

“It doesn’t look like he has a dent on his bumper. He looks like a million bucks. It’s a miracle,” Boos said.

“Yes, it is. It is. In my 19 years, I’ve only seen two walk out of the hospital,” Bracegirdle said.

Oak Creek Fire Chief Chuck Wisecup says in his 36-year career, this is the first time he has seen someone survive CPR.

“I think everyone needs to learn CPR,” Kainz said. “I think it’ll be a big awareness for everybody to learn CPR.”

Boos had taken a CPR class seven years prior. Ebaugh hadn’t taken one since he was in high school 25 years ago. They both say they now plan to be re-certified on a yearly basis.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

Click Here for webChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinfacebook  


Next Week is Safe & Sound Week 2019, Are you Participating?

Join us for Safe + Sound Week, August 12-18, 2019

What Is Safe + Sound Week?
A nationwide event to raise awareness and understanding of the value of safety and health programs that include management leadership, worker participation, and a systematic approach to finding and fixing hazards in workplaces.

Why Participate?
Safe workplaces are sound businesses. Successful safety and health programs can proactively identify and manage workplace hazards before they cause injury or illness, improving sustainability and the bottom line. Participating in Safe + Sound Week can help get your program started or energize an existing one.

Who Is Encouraged to Participate?
Organizations of any size or in any industry looking for an opportunity to show their commitment to safety to workers, customers, the public, or supply chain partners should participate.

How to Participate
Participating in Safe + Sound Week is easy. To get started, select the activities you would like to do at your workplace. You can host an event just for your workers or host a public event to engage your community. Examples of potential activities and tools to help you plan and promote your events are available. After you’ve completed your events, you can download a certificate and web badge to recognize your organization and your workers.

Need more inspiration? Watch a webinar to get ideas from organizations that participated in last year’s event.

https://www.osha.gov/safeandsoundweek/

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


5 Forklift Safety Elements – Part 5 “Know About Load Basics”

Forklift Safety Elements – Know About Load Basics

OSHA advises operators to check loads before picking them up with the forks, ensuring the load’s stability and dimensions will allow for safe transport. Move squarely in front of the load and move the forks apart as far as possible before driving them under the load. Make sure to not overload and that the load is centered.

Slightly tilt the forklift mast backward before lifting. Lift the load enough to clear the floor or rack. For stacking, OSHA recommends lifting the load above the lower stack by about 10 centimeters, or 4 inches.

When placing a load, operators should be squarely in front of the placement destination.  Make sure the area is flat and stable, and don’t place heavy loads on top of light ones. Lower the forks upon placing the load, and then back the forklift away. As always, ensure the load is stable.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety Training Specialist

Click Here for Workplace Safety Training Courses

Click Here for WebChat

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedin Follow us    facebook Like us

 

Source:https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/16138-elements-of-forklift-safety