Recent CPR Certification Helps Save Life

On Friday, April 19, Albert Lea resident Ronald Laite was invited to work on a dock at Fountain Lake with friends. Just a regular days work, for a normally healthy 43-year-old, that almost turned deadly.

“A buddy called me up and asked if I wanted to help with a dock, and so I said sure and went down there. I felt something weird going on so I tried to pull myself towards the center and then next thing you know I’m in the hospital,” said Laite.

Officials said that Laite went into cardiac arrest which is commonly associated with a heart attack, yet the two are very different.

Cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death is an electrical problem of the heart. Basically where there is no effective heartbeat and no blood flow to the vital organs of the body. A heart attack is a circulation problem effectively where there is a blockage in one of the arteries that supply blood to the heart. So two different problems,” said Dr. Ammar Killu, who is a Cardiac Electrophysiologist at Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Killu said even though most of the people who learn how to perform CPR may never end up using it, just knowing what to do raises that persons’ chance of survival.

“Doing CPR which is basically chest compressions in this situation, helps get whatever oxygen is still in the body around to those organs. The quicker you can perform CPR the more effective the CPR is and the higher chances of survival, ” said Dr. Killu.

For chest compressions, you want to remember 30/2. 30 compressions to the chest about 2 inches in depth. You also want to administer about 120 compressions per minute.

Laite’s friend was just CPR certified two months ago, and he said that he never thought he’d have to use.

“I’m very thankful he got trained in CPR. he saved my life,” said Laite.

 

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Source: https://www.kaaltv.com/news/recent-cpr-certification-helps-save-life—albert-lea/5327525/


More lives could be saved after cardiac arrest, are you CPR Certified?

Anyone can learn CPR, are you or your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity!

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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More people might survive cardiac arrest if more bystanders tried hands-only CPR

More lives could be saved after cardiac arrest if bystanders applied cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), even if it’s just the hands-only version, a new study suggests.

With hands-only CPR emerging as an alternative to the traditional method – chest compressions coupled with mouth-to-mouth rescue breaths – Swedish researchers decided to investigate the impact of the simpler method.

They found that when rates of either type of CPR increased, the chances of surviving a sudden cardiac arrest doubled.

“In this nationwide study (we saw) an almost six-fold higher proportion of patients receiving compression-only CPR,” said co-author Dr. Jacob Hollenberg, director of the Centre for Resuscitation Science at the Karolinska Institutet. “Any type of CPR was associated with doubled survival rates in comparison with cases not receiving CPR before EMS arrival.”

It’s currently unknown whether CPR including mouth-to-mouth rescue breaths when performed by bystanders is superior to the simpler hands-only method, Hollenberg said in an email. There is an ongoing large randomized controlled trial to answer that question, he added.

Hollenberg suspects more people would be willing to learn hands-only CPR than the traditional method.

For the study published in Circulation, Hollenberg and his colleagues analyzed all out-of-hospital bystander-witnessed cardiac arrests reported to the Swedish Register for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation between 2000 and 2017. Altogether the researchers had data on 30,445 patients.

The proportion of patients receiving CPR from bystanders grew from 40.8 percent in 2000-2005 to 68.2 percent in 2011-2017. The proportion who got standard CPR was 35.4 percent in the earlier period and 38.1 percent in the later period. But over the same time, the proportion who got hands-only CPR rose from 5.4 percent to 30.1 percent.

 

During the nearly two decades covered by the study, survival rates improved for both groups of patients. Thirty-day survival after standard CPR rose from 9.4 percent to 16.2 percent, and after hands-only CPR it rose from 8.0 percent to 14.3 percent.

Overall, compared to patients who didn’t get any kind of CPR from bystanders, those who got standard CPR before first responders arrived were 2.6 times as likely to survive to 30 days and those who got hands-only CPR were twice as likely to survive 30 days.

The study shows that any kind of CPR is better than no CPR, said Dr. Clifton Callaway, vice chair of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. “This is a tremendously robust data set,” Callaway said. “They’ve been able to track this for many, many years.”

The American Heart Association has been popularizing hands-only CPR, Callaway said. “The message they’re trying to convey is that if you don’t choose to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, you can still do chest compressions and help somebody with cardiac arrest,” he said, noting that mouth-to-mouth is still required for other conditions, such as drowning.

The reason hands-only can work is that when people experience a cardiac arrest, they still have oxygen in their lungs, Callaway said. “Chest compressions will buy you some time until someone comes to get the heart started again,” he said.

The other advantage to hands-only CPR is that 911 operators can talk you through it even if you haven’t had any training, Callaway said. “Dispatchers should be able to coach anybody to do chest compressions and provide this potential to sustain life until professional help arrives,” he added. “In my mind, there’s no reason we can’t have 60 to 80 percent of Americans who have had a cardiac arrest receiving assistance from bystanders.”

 

 

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Source: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-cpr/more-people-might-survive-cardiac-arrest-if-more-bystanders-tried-hands-only-cpr-idUSKCN1RD37U


71-year-old man saves best friend’s life with AED, CPR after heart attack

It was a normal day..

Bill Winness was walking his normal route through the Western Mall with his two friends the morning of April 5 when one started to feel dizzy. He urged Winness to keep going while he sat and rested for a bit.

Just minutes later, a woman came running after the 71-year-old and his friend, Ray Smidt, to tell them that their friend, Keith Clark, was suffering a heart attack.

They ran back as fast as they could. The next thing Winness knew, he was grabbing the Automated External Defibrillator (AED) inside the building while Smidt ran to Clark’s aid. Winness was by Clark’s side instantly after grabbing the AED.

Winness was trained how to use the AED, an electronic device that diagnoses a cardiac arrest, and how to apply electricity in the event of one, in addition to CPR training years ago. All he remembered were the basics, but that was enough.

Winness doesn’t remember panicking, just taking the steps he needed to save his best friend’s life.

“I guess you just do whatever you have to do, you know? You don’t really think about it,” Winness said.

The first step in using the AED was to apply adhesive strips to Clark’s chest for the AED to read what should be done. Since Clark had a pacemaker, the AED just instructed Winness to give CPR. He started chest compressions while another bystander stood on the line with a 9-1-1 dispatcher.

What Winness did helped provide the necessary oxygen to Clark’s brain and helped his heart pump blood while they waited for emergency responders.

It was only minutes, but what he did was vital to preserving Clark’s well-being, according to Scott Christensen, director of clinical service for Patient Care EMS.

“It buys time,” Christensen said. “That time it takes for someone to call for help until first responders arrive, it’s important for someone trained in CPR to give that type of care and assistance. All of that together is what helped save Keith’s life.”

If Winness wasn’t there to give CPR before units arrived, Christensen speculated that Clark might have passed away.

Clark, 81, was released from the heart hospital Friday. He’s in relatively good condition and was advised by his doctor to “lay low” for a few weeks.

This was Clark’s second heart attack, and he’s been suffering episodes for half his life. Winness and Clark talked about what they would do if this happened. They were prepared as much as they could be.

“We all knew where the defibrillator was mounted. We walk by it every day,” Clark said. “I think everybody should know CPR. It probably doesn’t hurt if everybody knew where these AEDs were either.”

Bystanders in Sioux Falls helped give CPR for 73 percent of cardiac arrests in 2017, according to Regional Emergency Medical Services Authority.

It’s common for bystanders to take action in Sioux Falls, just as Bill took charge to help Clark. Nationally though, the REMSA registry’s average is action from bystanders in 38 percent of cardiac arrests.

Part of that is because of wide CPR training in the Sioux Falls area and because of dispatchers instructing 9-1-1 callers how to give CPR. The high rate of bystander help can also be attributed to Sioux Falls Fire Rescue’s Pulsepoint app, which alerts people when CPR is needed nearby.

“Any CPR is better than no CPR,” Christensen said.

For AEDs, it’s 28 percent of bystanders who intervene with the device in Sioux Falls. About 11 percent of bystanders across the registry intervened with an AED in 2017.

There isn’t a standard on how to provide signs for AEDs, Christensen said. Clark worries there needs to be better ways to inform people where the AEDs are — it could mean life or death.

 

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Source: https://www.argusleader.com/story/news/crime/2019/04/09/71-year-old-man-saves-best-friends-life-aed-cpr-after-heart-attack/3380193002/


Teen used CPR to save her little sister’s life

Claire Taylor had learned CPR through the Girl Scouts. It’s a valuable lesson in preparedness.

Claire Taylor was babysitting her younger sister in their Ocean Township home when the unthinkable happened.

When Sarah Taylor, then 12, bent over to pet the family cat, she collapsed to the floor. She was having a cardiac arrest.

“For a second I stood there watching her, in shock, and then I opened the front door and yelled for help,” recalled Claire, who was 16 at time. “Then I called 911, I started praying and then I started CPR.”

As a middle-schooler, Claire had learned CPR while getting her babysitting certification through the Girl Scouts.

“I learned on Cabbage Patch kids,” she said.

It saved Sarah’s life. First responders arrived within minutes and fully revived her with a defibrillator. This was in November 2017. Sixteen months later, Sarah is doing great and Claire has received two big honors.

The first, the Girl Scouts’ Medal of Honor, was bestowed this past November. Claire was one of just 16 recipients nationwide in 2018.

“The words we have in our mission statement — courage, confidence and character — I think Claire demonstrated those with what she did in that extreme situation,” said Dena Mayo, director of community engagement for Girl Scouts of the Jersey Shore. “It’s wonderful to see the Girl Scout program in action. This was a great real-life example.”

The second, a Young Hero award from the American Legion Auxiliary for New Jersey, was presented last weekend by national auxiliary president Kathy Dungan.

“Claire is very humble; she didn’t think she deserved the award,” said Doreen Gallagher, past state president for the American Legion Auxiliary for New Jersey. “She looked at it as, she did what she was taught.”

The public accolades serve a key function, aside from celebrating a lifesaving act. They reinforce the need to train teens in CPR.

“It’s important to be able to provide this kind of information to our youth, so if something happens they’re prepared,” Gallagher said. “The more they know, the better.”

Looking back on the crucible moment, Claire Taylor emphasized that prayer kept her calm, and credits her faith for keeping her strong. Now a 17-year-old senior at Red Bank Regional High School, she has valuable advice for her peers.

“It’s definitely worthwhile to have some sort of (emergency response) background,” she said. “When the moment does arrive, if it does, you can focus on taking action with what you already know.”

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Source: https://www.app.com/story/news/local/values/2019/03/14/cpr-girl-scouts/3150486002/


Ohio pizza employees use CPR to save co-worker’s life

Gibson Gaynesbloom, 63, went into cardiac arrest March 5 while working at a Little Caesars in New Philadelphia, the television station reported.

His co-workers sprang into action. Keralyn Songer, 34, called paramedics. Nicole Strong, 35, who told WJW she learned CPR in high school, cleared Gaynesbloom’s air passage and put him on his back. Brody Ferris, who learned CPR last summer — “I only had three lifeguarding classes at the YMCA,” he told WJW — also helped out.

Strong continued mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until paramedics arrived, the television station reported.

Gaynesbloom was taken to a hospital and had emergency surgery that saved his life, WJW reported. He is expected to make a full recovery.“They essentially started to save my life. Thank you so much. Thank you all and thank you, everyone,” Gaynesbloom told the television station. “I’ve got children and grandchildren. I want to see them grow up.”

Andrea Tyson, who owns the pizza shop, threw a party for the trio Friday and gave them gift cards, WJW reported.

“The conversation I had with the three of them was that I believe that if one of them was not trained in CPR, then I don’t think he would be here today. I know he wouldn’t be here,” Tyson told the television station.

 

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Source: https://www.ajc.com/news/ohio-pizza-employees-use-cpr-save-worker-life/1aRlJkF2H2n9rHWM29jIOM/


CPR-certified ranch staff in Lakeland save life of teen who went into cardiac arrest

Bryelle Touchton was wrapping up her first horse riding lesson at Spring Lane Ranch when a staff member noticed the teen acting strangely.

“I could see her walking the horse back into the barn and when she got to the far end she looked like she was getting woozy and she looked like she fainted,” said Kim Wilkey, the site manager at the ranch.

The 15-year-old girl collapsed in front of her horse, Canela.

“She was blue. She was not reacting to anything,” said Alex Zapata, a trainer at Spring Lane Ranch.

Zapata and several of his colleagues jumped into action, administering CPR. They had no way to know Bryelle had gone into cardiac arrest.

“We evaluated her right away and could tell that she had no pulse and no respiration so we started CPR right away,” explained Wilkey.

“We started compressions, hard, hard, hard, and she reacted to it,” said Zapata.

It took almost 15 minutes for paramedics to arrive. Her mother, Beth Collins watched as Spring Lane Ranch employees kept her daughter alive.

“I’m really ever more so grateful for Spring Lane Ranch for everything that they have done for my daughter,” said Collins. “Had it not been for them, she wouldn’t be here today.”

The workers at the ranch were CPR-certified last August.

“You never know when you’re going to need it. Especially like that, a 15-year-old girl, you would never expect that,” said Zapata.

“Most people don’t survive the kind of episode that she had. We were all thrilled that we were able to be there for her,” said Wilkey.

Bryelle has been in the hospital for almost a week, but it will be a long road to recovery.

“She’s doing a lot better,” said Collins. “Especially over the past couple of days, she’s been out of the bed a couple of times. She understands everything.”

Collins says her daughter had no previous health scares. Doctors say she could need a pacemaker or defibrillator inserted into her heart.

 

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Source: http://www.fox13news.com/news/local-news/cpr-certified-ranch-staff-in-lakeland-save-life-of-teen-who-went-into-cardiac-arrest


The life saving skill you should know – CPR, are you ready to save a life?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity!

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

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More tips for heart month…

More heart-healthy tips…

Take Action: Food and Alcohol

Eat healthy.

Eating healthy can help lower your risk of heart disease. A heart-healthy diet includes foods that are low in saturated and trans fats, added sugars, and sodium (salt).

Heart-healthy items include high-fiber foods (whole grains, fruits, and vegetables) and certain fats (like the fats in olive oil and fish). Use this shopping list to find heart-healthy foods.

Check out these heart-healthy recipe collections:

Get heart-healthy tips for dining out [PDF – 3 MB]. For example, ask for a side salad instead of chips or french fries.

Drink alcohol only in moderation.

If you choose to drink alcohol, drink only in moderation. This means limiting your drinking to no more than 1 drink a day for woman and no more than 2 drinks a day for men. Drinking too much alcohol can increase your risk of heart disease.

 

Take Action: Physical Activity

Get active.

Getting active can help prevent heart disease. Adults need at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week. This includes walking fast, dancing, and biking.

If you are just getting started, try walking for 10 minutes a day, a few days each week. Then add more activity over time.

Stay at a healthy weight.

People who are overweight or obese are at an increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, losing just 10 pounds can lower your risk of heart disease. Find out how to control your weight.

If you don’t know if you are at a healthy weight, use this BMI calculator to figure out your BMI (body mass index).

Take Action: Healthy Habits

Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.

Quitting smoking helps lower your risk of heart disease and heart attack. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) for free support and to set up your plan for quitting.

Avoiding secondhand smoke is important, too – so keep your home smoke-free. If you have guests who smoke, ask them to smoke outside. If someone in your home smokes, use these tips to start a conversation about quitting.

Manage stress.

Managing stress can help prevent serious health problems like heart disease, depression, and high blood pressure. Deep breathing and meditation are good ways to relax and manage stress.

Source: https://healthfinder.gov/HealthTopics/Category/health-conditions-and-diseases/heart-health/keep-your-heart-healthy#take-action_5

Learn CPR today! CPR Certification

Call Now to schedule your CPR class

Shop for CPR Products

Shop for AED’s

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Learning CPR/First Aid is easy; helping save a life is priceless…

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity!

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

#cprreadytosavealife

 

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