5 Reasons Why Employees Need First Aid Training

OSHA requires businesses to provide first aid and CPR training to employees in the absence of a nearby clinic or hospital (OSHA Standard 1910.151).

While safety always begins with prevention, not every work-related injury can be prevented. Your primary first aid training goal should be to give employees the necessary tools and information they need to care for an ill or injured person, if necessary until advanced help arrives.

 

OSHA does not teach or certify programs. Therefore, employers are faced with numerous programs to choose from, and the choice can be difficult. Because of this, a consensus group comprised of a panel of government and private experts developed the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings in 1997.

This detailed curriculum identifies the skill training that makes a workplace first aid responder competent to provide care. Responding to OSHA’s requirement that every employer provides first aid assistance in the workplace, these guidelines document the minimum knowledge and skills necessary for an individual to provide basic life support care to an ill or injured person until the professional emergency response arrives.

 

While starting a first aid program can be simple and inexpensive, it involves several essential steps:

1. Recognize that it is your responsibility as an employer to determine the requirements for your first aid program. As you assess your workplace, be mindful of the job site or work process that could cause illness or injury to employees. What types of accidents could reasonably occur in your workplace? Consider such things as falls, hazardous machinery, and exposure to harmful substances. Be sure to put your evaluation in writing for reference purposes. Remember that, while OSHA does not recommend nor approve programs, it may evaluate your program’s adequacy during an inspection.

2. Assess the location and availability of a medical facility to your workplace. If a hospital, clinic, or other such emergency response is not readily available, for instance, within three to four minutes, you must have at least one employee trained in first aid and CPR per shift. There is no recommended number of trained employees to have on staff; it largely depends on your facility’s size and type of operations. Responding in a timely manner can mean the difference between life and death, so it is crucial that you have an appropriate number of employees trained.

For organizations in multiple sites, a larger number of employees must be trained. Many experts believe all employees should know how to provide first aid and CPR to ensure that help is always at hand. At a minimum, each department or location should have a responder available on each shift.

3. Make sure you have suitable first aid supplies readily available at all times. Click here to see current ANSI Standards

Effective Aug. 17, 1998, OSHA added an Appendix A to its very basic First Aid and Medical standard found in 29 CFR 1910.151. It requires the employer to reference ANSI Z308.1-1978, Minimum Requirements for Industrial Unit-Type First Aid Kits.

According to OSHA, the contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small worksites. However, larger or multiple operations should consider the need for additional first aid kits and additional types of first aid equipment and supplies in larger quantities. OSHA suggests consulting a local fire and rescue department appropriate medical professional or first aid supplier for assistance in these circumstances.

4. OSHA recommends you periodically assess your kit and increase your supplies as needed. Place your first aid supplies in an easily accessible area, and inform all your employees of its location. Along with a well-stocked, workplace-specific first aid kit, other basic supplies normally include emergency oxygen, blankets, stretchers, directional signs, eyewash stations, and burn stations.

In addition to these items, if blood-related incidents are anticipated, you must provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) as mandated in OSHA’s Blood-borne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). It lists specific PPE for this type of exposure, such as gloves, gowns, face shields, masks, and eye protection.

5. On-site safety inspections, review of hazards and emergency dispatch, assessment, implementation, escape, and treatment should be discussed in your training program. Employees must be trained to act and think quickly to avoid delayed treatment during an emergency. Ask yourself, whether each employee knows how to report an injury or illness.

Outline the accident investigating and reporting procedures and relay that to your employees as part of your company’s policy. Early recognition and treatment of an injury or illness are essential.

Employees must be aware of emergency contact information. It is best to post emergency procedures and emergency office contact numbers with your first aid supplies or in another highly visible and accessible area. Make sure that your field personnel also have suitable supplies and office contact numbers readily available. Appoint an employee in each department to watch for hazards and evaluate its current first aid status. Set a deadline to report any hazards or first aid needs to a manager or supervisor for improvement or correction.

Since people tend to forget their first aid training over time, OSHA recommends refresher training be conducted to recharge employees’ knowledge of first aid procedures. At a minimum, employees should be certified annually to perform CPR and once every three years to perform first aid. If such training sounds burdensome, consider that it can produce safer work practices and fewer incidents among employees.

Keeping the workplace safe involves three basic elements:

  1. Steps to prevent or minimize accidents
  2. Adequate first aid supplies
  3. Proper first aid training.

The employer uses training to make sure its employees know what to do, how to do it, and who is in charge in case a first aid or emergency situation occurs. Proper first aid training not only satisfies OSHA requirements but fosters goodwill among employees, who recognize the care that their company expends to provide a safe and healthy environment for its most valuable asset: its employees.

 

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Responding to Cardiac Arrest in the Workplace

Recent surveys have revealed a significant lack of training and preparedness for responding to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) incidents in U.S. workplaces.

A survey by the American Heart Association concluded that many American workers do not have access to emergency care training, nor do they know the location of their employer’s automated external defibrillator (AED). That knowledge would go a long way towards positively impacting the 10,000 SCA incidents that occur in the workplace each year.

According to a Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation article on the study:

More than half (55 percent) cannot get first aid or CPR+AED training from their employer – and even if employers do offer this training, it’s often either one or the other.
Half of all U.S. workers (50 percent) cannot locate the AED at work. In the hospitality industry, that number rises to two-thirds (66 percent).

A second survey was deployed to a group of “more than 1,000 safety managers in industries regulated by the U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA),” which revealed that:

One-third (33 percent) of safety managers said lives have been saved at home and at the workplace as a result of first aid, CPR, and AED training provided at work – and three-quarters (75 percent) said injuries or medical conditions have been treated in the workplace with this training.
More than one-third (36 percent) felt it would be valuable to offer training more frequently than every two years (the current requirement).

Younger generations at OSHA-regulated industries were less likely to participate in first aid, CPR, and AED training, although the numbers are still high at over 44 percent.

As part of our mission to “Make the Workplace and Community Safer,” UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid & Safety offers a number of emergency care training solutions to businesses of all sizes.

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Are your employees “Gloved” for safety?

Hand injuries, including injury to fingernails and fingers, are often written off as first-aid usage and near-misses. Many workers consider the use of gloves hard to comply with and unnecessary. Yet, more varieties of gloves for broader purposes exist than ever before – cut-resistant, chemical protective, electrically-rated, infection control, just to name a few. Carefully identifying the need, then selecting a glove with the appropriate performance parameters can prevent many injuries.

Back in the ‘old days’ People considered it a sign of toughness not to wear gloves. Most never considered wearing gloves to keep a better grip on tools, prevent knuckle busters and burns, or just keep my hands clean. In my teens and twenties, I would have been laughed at for wearing gloves. Now watching shows like Orange County Chopper, Monster Garage, and Pimp My Ride you see these master mechanics wearing gloves.

Gloves can make your job easier and safer. Choosing the correct glove for the job is a critical decision in preventing injuries while maintaining a grip on the situation. Identify the hazard and then evaluate the required characteristics for a glove. Hazards can range from heat, flames, sparks, sharp objects, electrical energy, and chemicals.

Identify the hazards that could injure hands in this week’s discussion. List the characteristics required in each case and check your inventory to see if you have the proper gloves. Gloves are considered PPE and are the last line of defense in preventing injuries. Wear them every time. Remember that prevention is the key to a workplace where Nobody Gets Hurt.

OSHA 1910.138(a)

General requirements. Employers shall select and require employees to use appropriate hand protection when employees’ hands are exposed to hazards such as those from skin absorption of harmful substances; severe cuts or lacerations; severe abrasions; punctures; chemical burns; thermal burns; and harmful temperature extremes.

OSHA 1910.138(b)

Selection. Employers shall base the selection of the appropriate hand protection on an evaluation of the performance characteristics of the hand protection relative to the task(s) to be performed, conditions present, duration of use, and the hazards and potential hazards identified.

 

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What is the best way to manage insect bites and stings?

 

Common reactions to insect bites and stings are mild. Often causing little more than stinging, redness and itching or minor swelling. Rarely do insect bites and stings, such as from a bee, a wasp, a hornet, a fire ant or a scorpion, can result in severe reactions.

To take care of an insect bite or sting that causes a mild reaction:

  • Move to a safe area to avoid more bites or stings.
  • If needed, remove the stinger – Click here for more info on insect poison extractors.
  • Wash the area with soap and water.
  • Apply a cool compress. Use a cloth dampened with cold water or filled with ice. This helps reduce pain and swelling. If the injury is on an arm or leg, elevate it.
  • Apply 0.5 or 1 percent hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion or a baking soda paste to the bite or sting several times daily until your symptoms go away.
  • Take an antihistamine (Benadryl, others) to reduce itching.
  • Usually, the signs and symptoms of a bite or sting disappear in a day or two. If you’re concerned — even if your reaction is minor — call your doctor.

Call 911 or your local emergency number if the injured person experiences:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swelling of the lips, eyelids or throat
  • Dizziness, faintness or confusion
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Hives
  • Nausea, cramps or vomiting
  • A scorpion sting and is a child
  • Take these actions immediately while waiting for medical help:

Ask the person if he or she is carrying an epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen, Auvi-Q, others) to treat an allergic attack.

If the person says he or she needs to use an autoinjector, ask whether you should help inject the medication. This is usually done by pressing the autoinjector against the person’s thigh and holding it in place for several seconds.

Loosen tight clothing and cover the person with a blanket. Don’t give him or her anything to drink.

If the person is vomiting, position him or her to prevent choking.

Begin CPR if the person shows no signs of circulation, such as breathing, coughing or movement.

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First Aid Service – CPR Certification – First Aid Cabinet refill – Facility Services – First Aid – Safety Training


5 First Aid Myths

In a medical emergency, the right response can save lives

These are unprecedented times, people continue to work from home and as the Coronavirus continues to keep us under stay at home orders its important to understand some basic First Aid facts to help keep you and your family safe.

Many of us are still doing the wrong thing. Getting first aid right can mean the difference between life and death. Here are some of the most common myths about first aid… and what you should do instead.

 

MYTH 1: Put butter on a burn

Any new burn that’s exposed to the air is incredibly painful. Covering it with a cool substance such as butter will slightly ease the agony for a time. But the pain will soon return –  and sealing off the air before the burn has cooled can keep the heat in, meaning the skin continues to burn.

For most burns, the general advice instead is to remove any clothing and jewelry touching the burn, then to run your burn under the faucet for a lot longer than you think – at least 20 minutes. This prevents the skin from continuing to burn, as well as helping to numb the area.

Once the burn is thoroughly cooled you can cover it up with a clean cloth or cling film or a plastic bag to prevent it from becoming infected.

There’s just one situation where butter on a burn can be useful: if you get hot tar on your skin. The fattiness of the butter can help to remove it, reducing the pain.

 

 

MYTH 2: Giving chest compressions to someone who doesn’t need them can cause more harm than good

If someone has a cardiac arrest, the biggest predictor of their survival is whether or not someone gives them cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before medical help arrives.

If you go on a first aid course, you learn to watch the chest and put your head to person’s close to listen for breaths. If there’s no sign that the person is breathing, you should call emergency services and begin CPR.

First aid instructors also tell you that even if you’re not sure the person is breathing normally, you should again proceed with CPR anyway.

Although this is the advice, many people are reluctant to give CPR because they fear doing more harm than good.

 

 

MYTH 3: To do CPR properly, you need to give mouth-to-mouth as well as doing chest compressions

The guidelines on this have changed a lot in the past decade. Standard CPR used to involve alternating 15 fast-paced compressions with two breaths into the patient’s mouth. Then it was found that giving two breaths after every 30 compressions was just as effective. This became the standard advice.

There was a 22% improvement in survival rates if bystanders gave compression alone, instead of compression with breaths

Next came the idea of doing CPR without giving any breaths at all. This results in fewer pauses and allows more opportunity for the compressions to keep blood flowing to the brain. Although the blood may not be fully aerated, at least it gets to the brain quickly. Three randomized controlled trials comparing the methods found only marginal differences between the two methods.

But when the results from these studies were combined and re-analyzed, there was a 22% improvement in survival rates if bystanders – who were doing CPR with guidance on the phone from ambulance dispatchers – gave compression alone.

These results do not apply to children or to cases of near-drowning, where breaths are still recommended.

 

Giving CPR without breaths is easier and more effective than with breaths – but even so, only 39% of women and 45% of men receive CPR from bystanders

Also, many people are reluctant to do mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on a stranger.

But still not everyone is prepared to give chest compressions. Research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions in 2017 revealed that some bystanders seem to be wary of touching women’s chests. Audrey Blewer studied almost 20,000 cases of cardiac arrest and found that 45% of men received CPR from bystanders – compared with 39% of women.

 

 

MYTH 4: You shouldn’t shock someone with a defibrillator unless you are certain their heart has stopped

This is a major myth. After all, defibrillators, often kept in public places like railway stations, are designed for anyone to use. You don’t have to work out for yourself whether the person who’s collapsed would benefit from electric shocks to startle the heart into rhythm: the machine itself can assess what’s needed. If shocks aren’t necessary, it won’t give them.

Even though defibrillators often can be found in many public places, many people remain intimidated to use them

US research has shown that survival rates double if a public access defibrillator is used rather than CPR alone.

 

 

MYTH 5: Tilt the head backwards to stop a nosebleed

This is very old advice – but can result in a person swallowing their blood into their stomachs or even choking on it, all while continuing to bleed. Instead, the best way to stem the bleeding is to apply pressure by pinching the soft part of the nose and leaning forwards for 10 minutes. If bleeding hasn’t stopped after half an hour, seek medical advice.

 

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What’s the difference between a sprain and a strain, and what the heck is R.I.C.E Therapy?

During these times of isolation at home, at-home workouts have become more popular. Exercise is good for our bodies and mental well being but as with any physical activity, an injury can always happen. Do you know what to do if you have an accident such as a sprain or strain? And what it the correct way to take care of an injury like a strain? Read on for what the difference is between a sprain and a strain and how to treat both.

Sprains and strains are often used interchangeably. While very common for a first responder to encounter, they are not the same thing.

Sprain

A sprain is a stretch or tear in a ligament. Ligaments are bands of fibrous tissue that connect bones to bones at joints.

Excessive force applied to a joint can cause these ligaments to tear – this is a sprain. Usually when a person falls, twists, or is hit in a way that forces the body out of its normal position.

The most common type of sprain is a sprained ankle. About 25,000 people sprain an ankle every day.

Strain

A strain is also a stretch or tear, but it happens in a muscle or a tendon. Tendons link muscles to the bones. This is very common in contact sports like football, boxing and hockey.

Treatment of sprains and strains

Although there is a difference between sprains and strains the first aid treatment of both is the same.

This is known as RICE therapy.

-Rest

-Ice

-Comfortable support / Compression

-Elevation

This simple first aid treatment will relieve swelling and subsequently relieve the pain from these injuries.

Always seek medical attention if the pain and swelling don’t start to lessens after 24 to 72 hours.

 

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Is your First Aid program compliant?

Ever wondered if your company meets ANSI standards for workplace First Aid?

As we all seek to limit the number of hospital visits, now is a good time for companies to review their First Aid Programs. Below is some important information on First Aid compliance requirements.

ANSI (American National Standards Institute) Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies (ANSI Z308.1) establishes the minimum requirements for first aid kit supplies. First aid kits are classified based on the assortment and quantity of first aid supplies intended to deal with most types of injuries and sudden illnesses that may be encountered in the workplace.

5.1.1 Class A Kit’s

Class A first aid kits are intended to provide a basic range of products to deal with most common types of injuries encountered in the workplace including: major wounds, minor wounds (cuts and abrasions), minor burns and eye injuries. First aid kits designated as Class A shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

FA Small Cab

ANSI First Aid Standards

5.1.2 Class B Kits 

Class B kits are intended to provide a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries encountered in more populated, complex and/or high risk workplace environments. First aid kits designated as Class B shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

ANSI Class B Cabinet

For more information about First Aid Cabinet Service click here

 

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Grocery Store Employee Saves Customer’s Life

Call it an early Christmas Miracle.

Kevin Garcia says he was waiting in line at the Save Mart at Willow and Nees in Fresno, when suddenly he keeled over with a heart attack. That’s when Garcia says his cashier ran around the counter to give him CPR, and saved his life.

“Everything’s fine, and I feel like I have a new chance at life – a new lease at life.”

56-year-old Kevin Garcia is looking for the cashier at SaveMart who saved his life when he had a heart attack last week. Guess what — we found him!

 

Embedded video

We caught up with Garcia about five minutes before he was carted off to surgery at St. Agnes Hospital.

For a guy about to have heart surgery – boy was he spritely.

“The doctor told me, hey, you need to see a cardiologist. I didn’t disagree, I just scheduled the cardiologist for December 26th, which is a little bit far away, and I didn’t quite make it,” Garcia explained.

He didn’t make it to that cardiologist appointment, because he didn’t make it home from the grocery store last week.

And before you know it, my ears started ringing – and they’ve rung before, because they had some congestion and this was something that I felt – but this time it was different, and the congestion turned into what sounded like tinnitus with a jet engine.

Michael Perkins is an employee at that store and noticed something was wrong.

“Checking in this register right here, and I just heard this crash and I looked up. Things were going all over the place, and the lady right here said, ‘oh my god’ and she ran around. And I turned around, and this gentleman’s feet were right here, and he’d hit his head on the corner, and he was bleeding.”

Very luckily, before his days as a cashier, Perkins used to work at a hospital.

CPR means applying firm, consistent chest compressions. Doctors say it can be very exhausting to maintain.

Witnesses say that Perkins administered CPR for about five minutes.

“To be honest with you, it seemed like a couple of seconds. It happened, and it was over in the blink of an eye,” Perkins said.

Garcia says that if it weren’t for Perkins, he would not be here to tell his story.

There’s no other way to say it – he saved my life… That guy’s a hero, and I don’t know much about him – I know his name’s Michael. but I hope he gets some recognition, and I hope he’ll let me do a few nice things for him. I’ve got some really nice things in mind.”

Kevin’s father says that he’s out of surgery, doing just fine. He’ll have to take a little bit to recover.

 

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Source: https://kmph.com/news/local/fresno-grocery-store-cashier-saves-customers-life-after-he-suffered-a-heart-attack


It’s Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month – Learn CPR

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Over 300,000 Americans die every year from Sudden Cardiac Arrest, be sure your company has first responders trained and ready to help save a life.

We make it easy! UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month – What You Should Know

More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)

SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS. To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. But they are not the same thing.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Awareness

October is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month, which represents a critical initiative by the Heart Rhythm Society to raise awareness for Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and help the public become more familiar with what it is, how it affects people, and what can be done to help save lives.

The Society’s award-winning “Apples and Oranges” campaign uses a simple analogy to educate people about the difference between a heart attack and SCA. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. The campaign targets heart attack survivors, who are at the highest risk for SCA, and stresses the importance of maintaining a healthy heart lifestyle and learning critical risk markers, especially their Ejection Fraction (EF).

This public service announcement explains the dangers of SCA and features Emmy-award winning journalist Shaun Robinson.

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest

  • More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest.
  • SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS.
  • To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring.

Responding to SCA — Time is Everything

Time-to-treatment is critical when considering the chance of survival for an SCA victim. Ninety-five percent of those who experience SCA die because they do not receive life-saving defibrillation within four to six minutes, before brain and permanent death start to occur. Learn more about the steps to take when responding to a potential SCA emergency.

SCA Resources

Patients can access information about SCA, including causes, prevention, and other important facts.

SCArisk.org

Learn your SCA risk by using an interactive online tool. It’s fast and easy — simply answer a few questions regarding your health and get your results. After you have finished using the assessment, please consult with your physician regarding your results.

 

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Source: https://www.hrsonline.org/sudden-cardiac-arrest-sca-awareness