Is your First Aid program compliant with the latest ANSI Standards?

ANSI (American National Standards Institute) Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies (ANSI Z308.1) establishes the minimum requirements for first aid kit supplies. First aid kits are classified based on the assortment and quantity of first aid supplies intended to deal with most types of injuries and sudden illnesses that may be encountered in the workplace.

5.1.1 Class A Kit’s

Class A first aid kits are intended to provide a basic range of products to deal with most common types of injuries encountered in the workplace including: major wounds, minor wounds (cuts and abrasions), minor burns and eye injuries. First aid kits designated as Class A shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

FA Small Cab

ANSI First Aid Standards

5.1.2 Class B Kits 

Class B kits are intended to provide a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries encountered in more populated, complex and/or high risk workplace environments. First aid kits designated as Class B shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

ANSI Class B Cabinet

For more information about First Aid Cabinet Service click here or Call: 800-869-6970


Are you ready to save a life? Learn CPR/First Aid

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

September 17th  – 21st

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

 

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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70% of hand injuries are preventable, what you need to know….

Hand injuries, including injury to fingernails and fingers, are often written off as first-aid usage and near-misses. Many workers consider the use of gloves hard to comply with and unnecessary. Yet, more varieties of gloves for broader purposes exist than ever before – cut-resistant, chemical protective, electrically-rated, infection control, just to name a few. Carefully identifying the need, then selecting a glove with the appropriate performance parameters can prevent many injuries.

Back in the ‘old days’ People considered it a sign of toughness not to wear gloves. Most never considered wearing gloves to keep a better grip on tools, prevent knuckle busters and burns, or just keep my hands clean. In my teens and twenties, I would have been laughed at for wearing gloves. Now watching shows like Orange County Chopper, Monster Garage, and Pimp My Ride you see these master mechanics wearing gloves.

Gloves can make your job easier and safer. Choosing the correct glove for the job is a critical decision in preventing injuries while maintaining a grip on the situation. Identify the hazard and then evaluate the required characteristics for a glove. Hazards can range from heat, flames, sparks, sharp object electrical energy, and chemicals.

Identify the hazards that could injure hands in this week’s discussion. List the characteristics required in each case and check your inventory to see if you have the proper gloves. Gloves are considered PPE and are the last line of defense in preventing injuries. Wear them every time. Remember that prevention is the key to a workplace where Nobody Gets Hurt.

OSHA 1910.138(a)

General requirements. Employers shall select and require employees to use appropriate hand protection when employees’ hands are exposed to hazards such as those from skin absorption of harmful substances; severe cuts or lacerations; severe abrasions; punctures; chemical burns; thermal burns; and harmful temperature extremes.

OSHA 1910.138(b)

Selection. Employers shall base the selection of the appropriate hand protection on an evaluation of the performance characteristics of the hand protection relative to the task(s) to be performed, conditions present, duration of use, and the hazards and potential hazards identified.

 

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First Aid/CPR Classes September 10th – 14th

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

September 10th  – 14th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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Do you know the 3 different types of bleeding and how to control them?

External blood is when blood leaves the body through any type of wound. First aid responders should be competent at dealing with major blood loss. There are broadly three different types of bleeding: arterial, venous and capillary.

How much blood do we have?
The average adult human as anywhere between 8 and 12 pints of blood depending on their body size.

Remember that children have less blood than adults, and as such cannot afford to lose the same amount – a baby only has around 1 pint of blood.

What are the different types of bleeding?

Arterial
With this type of bleeding, the blood is typically bright red to yellowish in colour, due to the high degree of oxygenation. A wound to a major artery could result in blood ‘spurting’ in time with the heartbeat, several meters and the blood volume will rapidly reduce.

Venous
This blood is flowing from a damaged vein. As a result, it is blackish in colour (due to the lack of oxygen it transports) and flows in a steady manner. Caution is still indicated: while the blood loss may not be arterial, it can still be quite substantial, and can occur with surprising speed without intervention.

Capillary
Bleeding from capillaries occurs in all wounds. Although the flow may appear fast at first, blood loss is usually slight and is easily controlled. Bleeding from a capillary could be described as a ‘trickle’ of blood.

The key first aid treatment for all of these types of bleeding is direct pressure over the wound.

 

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First Aid/CPR Compliance Training

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes August 20th – 24th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

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A Little First Aid History – Did You Know?

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CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes August 13th – 17th

Do we really need CPR Training?

Here are 3 real reasons why CPR Training is one of the most important training classes you can ever have…

 

* 900 Americans die every day from Sudden Cardiac Arrest

* 95% of victims die before reaching a hospital

* 4 minutes – Brain death starts to occur within 4 minutes, the average response time of EMS is 8 minutes.

 

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes August 13th – 17th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid/CPR

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

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Should you restrain a person having a seizure?

Approximately 1 out of 10 people have had a seizure. Because seizures are very common, it’s important to learn what to do to help keep that person safe until the seizure stops.

There are many types of seizures. Most seizures end in a few minutes.

These are general steps to help someone who is having any type seizure:

  • Stay with the person until the seizure ends and he or she is fully awake. After it ends, help the person sit in a safe place. Once they are alert and able to communicate, tell them what happened in very simple terms.
  • Comfort the person and speak calmly.
  • Check to see if the person is wearing a medical bracelet or other emergency information.
  • Keep yourself and other people calm.
  • Offer to call a taxi or another person to make sure the person gets home safely.

A seizure (fit) occurs due to excessive and disorganized electrical activity in our brain. A major seizure occurs when the victim falls to the ground and starts shaking uncontrollably. This is known as a tonic-clonic seizure or a grand mal seizure.

Victims of a major seizure are normally unconscious during the episode and not aware of their surroundings.

There are many myths about the correct first aid treatment for a victim having a seizure. One of these myths is around restraining a victim to stop them from injuring themselves – this is incorrect and potentially dangerous!

  • Do not hold the person down or try to stop his or her movements.
  • Do not put anything in the person’s mouth. This can injure teeth or the jaw. A person having a seizure cannot swallow his or her tongue.
  • Do not try to give mouth-to-mouth breaths (like CPR). People usually start -breathing again on their own after a seizure.
  • Do not offer the person water or food until he or she is fully alert.

Attempting to restrain the victim will not shorten the duration of the seizure or speed up the victim’s recovery. This myth has the potential to cause serious harm to a seizure victim.

The Correct First Aid Steps for a Seizure

The following first aid steps should be carried out for a victim having a major seizure (fit):

  • Call for emergency medical help
  • Move on any bystanders
  • Move away from any potential hazards from the victim and protect their head
  • Once the seizure finishes, roll the victim onto their side and ensure the airway is open and they are breathing
  • Don’t attempt to restrain the victim or place anything in their mouth
  • If the victim stops breathing then start CPR immediately and call for a defibrillator.

CDC Seizure First Aid

 

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OTC Medications In The Workplace? Here’s What Your Co Workers Think…

89% of workers indicated that having OTC medications available from a nurse made it possible to complete their shift

University of Michigan Study Findings:

  • The workers surveyed reported visiting their company’s health/medical department on average 10 times per year.
  • The top four worker complaints that occurred while on the job were headaches, colds/sinus problems, muscle ache/pain, and burns.
  • 73% of those surveyed regularly experienced headaches and cold and sinus symptoms while at work.
  • More than half (55%) of those surveyed experienced muscle and joint pain at work.
  • Almost half (46%) of employees experienced cuts and burns on their skin while on the job.
  • 89% of those surveyed believed the over0the-counter medications provided by the company helped them feel well enough to complete their shifts.
  • Employees strongly agree with the statement: “I highly recommend having over-the-counter medications available to workers in other work sites that currently do not have over-the-counter medications in place.”

University of Michigan workplace study sponsored by Medique Products.

Other Facts About Lost TIme in the Workplace:

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control there are 358 million work-loss days each year related to acute conditions.
  • Each year, there are more than 75 million work-loss days due to influenza.

Contact a UniFirst First Aid + Safety representative today for a free consultation.

Call 1-800-869-6970

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