Do you know how to recognize and help someone who is choking?

We are living in interesting and challenging times right now, to say the least, more and more people are working from home and self-isolating, which can bring a whole new set of challenges. 

A simple but common accident that can happen at work in the office or at home is choking, while it’s scary to think about, we have put together some tips to help recognize and act upon in the event of choking. Choking is a common cause of accidental death and often preventable. Objects such as food, candy or small objects can easily become lodged in the airway if they are accidentally ‘breathed in’ rather than swallowed.

Signs and symptoms of choking

  • Unable to speak or cough
  • Grasping or pointing to the throat
  • Distressed look on the face
  • First aid treatment of choking

Encourage the patient to cough, If the choking is only mild, this will clear the obstruction and the patient should be able to speak to you.

If the obstruction is not cleared:

Give back blows

Call for help, but don’t leave the patient yet.

Bend them forward so the head is lower than the chest. For a smaller child, you can place them over your knee to do this.

Give up to 5 firm blows between the shoulder blades with the palm of your hand. Check between blows and stop if you clear the obstruction.

If the obstruction is still not cleared:

Give abdominal thrusts

  • Stand behind the person and wrap your arms around the waist.
  • Place your clenched fist just above the person’s navel. Grab your fist with your other hand.
  • Quickly pull inward and upward as if trying to lift the person up.
  • Perform a total of 5 abdominal thrusts.
  • If the blockage is still not dislodged, continue cycles of 5 back blows and 5 abdominal thrusts until the object is coughed up or the person starts to breathe or cough.
  • Take the object out of his mouth only if you can see it. Never do a finger sweep unless you can see the object in the person’s mouth

Give CPR, if necessary

If the obstruction comes out, but the person becomes unconscious, begin CPR.

Continue CPR until medical personnel arrives.

 

What if I am choking and nobody is around to help?

It’s a scary situation whether you’re in a room full of people or alone at home. But there is a fast and effective solution: the Heimlich Maneuver®.

The best way to dislodge an obstruction is the Heimlich Maneuver. And if you’re alone, you can perform the Self-Heimlich.

Even though you won’t be able to speak when you’re choking, call 9-1-1 so help is on the way if you need it. Then take action to dislodge the obstruction.

Here’s how you can save your life with the Self-Heimlich:

  • Position yourself behind a chair or on the edge of a table.
  • Press your abdomen, the same area you’d place your fist on another person, against a table or chair with quick inward and upward thrusts.
  • Repeat until the object is dislodged.

You can also watch the Heimlich Heroes Self-Heimlich video for a closer look at how to perform the maneuver on yourself.

 

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Firefighter knows the value of an AED firsthand

Les Morgan knows because his life was saved by the quick response of those around him Feb. 18. The 60-year-old firefighter with Schuylkill Hose Company No. 2 and borough resident responded to smoke in a structure and was handing his son, who is also a firefighter, a fire extinguisher when suddenly he was on the floor not breathing normally.

Les Morgan was suffering a cardiac arrest

EMS, firefighters and Schuylkill Haven Police Department officers all had a hand in saving Les Morgan. Kyle Morgan didn’t know everyone who helped save his father’s life, but trusted they knew what to do while he waited outside.

“He was down for less than two minutes,” Morgan said.

Within that time, 90 seconds of CPR was given and Morgan was shocked with the AED, which reads your heart rhythm and determines if a shock is needed. It then gives procedural instructions.

“A lot of people are afraid they are going to hurt someone,” by using the AED, Kyle Morgan said.

Every minute CPR is not given, the survival rate drops by 10 percent, according to the AHA.

About 70 percent of sudden cardiac arrests occur at home, while the remainder occur in public settings and nursing homes, according to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

 

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Source: Standard-Speaker


His heart stopped for 19 minutes. CPR saved his life.

 

We’ve all heard it; CPR can mean the difference between life or death.

“You can be very young, you can be very old, it does not matter. Cardiac arrest does not discriminate and can affect anyone at any time,” says Gabrielle Purick, Program Administrator for Keep the Beat, Mecklenburg County.

Sudden cardiac arrest is when a person’s heart suddenly stops beating. It strikes people of all ages who seem to be healthy, including children, making it the 3rd leading cause of death in the U.S.

It’s different than a heart attack in that a person who goes into cardiac arrest passes out, is unresponsive and unable to breathe on their own.

Sudden cardiac arrest is extremely fatal, it takes over 90 percent of the lives it affects,” which is why Purick said CPR is so crucial to survival.

“For every one-minute that someone is on the ground having a cardiac arrest without help their chance of survival goes down 10 percent,” she said.

It’s also why Omar’s case is such a testament to the power of CPR. Paramedics with Mecklenburg County EMS say this September Omar, a healthy 28-year old, went into sudden cardiac arrest. They say his heart stopped beating for 19 minutes.

“His case is actually what we aim for all of our cases to turn out as, so Omar got bystander CPR right away, got help on the scene, by the time our paramedics and EMT showed up, bystander CPR was being performed and now he’s alive and well today because of it,” said Purick.

Every year Mecklenburg County EMS transports more than 155-thousand patients.

But every so often, some of those patients return to thank the first responders who helped to save their lives. This December Omar and his family made a visit to MEDIC headquarters to meet the paramedics who helped to save him.

“Having patients come back and visit our teams that worked on them is personally my favorite part of getting to work here. We get to see Omar come back with his family, his child and his wife and really show the fruit of the labor that our employees work so hard to achieve,” said Purick.

He’s now sharing these special moments, showing how a life can be saved, by simply knowing CPR.

Purick says anyone can take free CPR classes through Keep the Beat. Keep the Beat is a joint initiative of Mecklenburg EMS Agency (Medic), Mecklenburg County, Atrium Health, and Novant Health that aims to reduce out of hospital cardiac mortality by increasing bystander CPR in Mecklenburg County.

The program offers free bystander CPR training, AED awareness and the PulsePoint app availability PulsePoint app is an app you can download to your phone, which sends out an alert when someone nearby is in cardiac arrest.

Purick says the county began using the app at the beginning of 2019 and already has more than 4,000 residents who have downloaded it.

According to MEDIC, more than 1,000 patients have survived and thrived after suffering sudden cardiac arrest in Mecklenburg County since 2010.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is extremely fatal, it takes over 90 percent of the lives it affects so to have 1000 people walking around our community who otherwise wouldn’t be is something we should be really proud of and it goes out to our community members who performed CPR before our people got there,” she said.

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Source: https://www.wcnc.com/article/news/health/cpr-saves-lives/275-aaed30f6-895e-4218-8d87-f9f506191c94


Grocery Store Employee Saves Customer’s Life

Call it an early Christmas Miracle.

Kevin Garcia says he was waiting in line at the Save Mart at Willow and Nees in Fresno, when suddenly he keeled over with a heart attack. That’s when Garcia says his cashier ran around the counter to give him CPR, and saved his life.

“Everything’s fine, and I feel like I have a new chance at life – a new lease at life.”

56-year-old Kevin Garcia is looking for the cashier at SaveMart who saved his life when he had a heart attack last week. Guess what — we found him!

 

Embedded video

We caught up with Garcia about five minutes before he was carted off to surgery at St. Agnes Hospital.

For a guy about to have heart surgery – boy was he spritely.

“The doctor told me, hey, you need to see a cardiologist. I didn’t disagree, I just scheduled the cardiologist for December 26th, which is a little bit far away, and I didn’t quite make it,” Garcia explained.

He didn’t make it to that cardiologist appointment, because he didn’t make it home from the grocery store last week.

And before you know it, my ears started ringing – and they’ve rung before, because they had some congestion and this was something that I felt – but this time it was different, and the congestion turned into what sounded like tinnitus with a jet engine.

Michael Perkins is an employee at that store and noticed something was wrong.

“Checking in this register right here, and I just heard this crash and I looked up. Things were going all over the place, and the lady right here said, ‘oh my god’ and she ran around. And I turned around, and this gentleman’s feet were right here, and he’d hit his head on the corner, and he was bleeding.”

Very luckily, before his days as a cashier, Perkins used to work at a hospital.

CPR means applying firm, consistent chest compressions. Doctors say it can be very exhausting to maintain.

Witnesses say that Perkins administered CPR for about five minutes.

“To be honest with you, it seemed like a couple of seconds. It happened, and it was over in the blink of an eye,” Perkins said.

Garcia says that if it weren’t for Perkins, he would not be here to tell his story.

There’s no other way to say it – he saved my life… That guy’s a hero, and I don’t know much about him – I know his name’s Michael. but I hope he gets some recognition, and I hope he’ll let me do a few nice things for him. I’ve got some really nice things in mind.”

Kevin’s father says that he’s out of surgery, doing just fine. He’ll have to take a little bit to recover.

 

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Source: https://kmph.com/news/local/fresno-grocery-store-cashier-saves-customers-life-after-he-suffered-a-heart-attack


It’s Sudden Cardiac Awareness Month – Learn CPR

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

Over 300,000 Americans die every year from Sudden Cardiac Arrest, be sure your company has first responders trained and ready to help save a life.

We make it easy! UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month – What You Should Know

More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)

SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS. To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. But they are not the same thing.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Awareness

October is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month, which represents a critical initiative by the Heart Rhythm Society to raise awareness for Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and help the public become more familiar with what it is, how it affects people, and what can be done to help save lives.

The Society’s award-winning “Apples and Oranges” campaign uses a simple analogy to educate people about the difference between a heart attack and SCA. More than 65 percent of Americans not only underestimate the seriousness of SCA, but also believe SCA is a type of heart attack. The campaign targets heart attack survivors, who are at the highest risk for SCA, and stresses the importance of maintaining a healthy heart lifestyle and learning critical risk markers, especially their Ejection Fraction (EF).

This public service announcement explains the dangers of SCA and features Emmy-award winning journalist Shaun Robinson.

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest

  • More than 350,000 deaths occur each year as a result of sudden cardiac arrest.
  • SCA claims one life every two minutes, taking more lives each year than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS.
  • To decrease the death toll from SCA, it is important to understand what SCA is, what warning signs are, and how to respond and prevent SCA from occurring.

Responding to SCA — Time is Everything

Time-to-treatment is critical when considering the chance of survival for an SCA victim. Ninety-five percent of those who experience SCA die because they do not receive life-saving defibrillation within four to six minutes, before brain and permanent death start to occur. Learn more about the steps to take when responding to a potential SCA emergency.

SCA Resources

Patients can access information about SCA, including causes, prevention, and other important facts.

SCArisk.org

Learn your SCA risk by using an interactive online tool. It’s fast and easy — simply answer a few questions regarding your health and get your results. After you have finished using the assessment, please consult with your physician regarding your results.

 

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Source: https://www.hrsonline.org/sudden-cardiac-arrest-sca-awareness


Post-Dispatch’s Goold helps save man’s life at Busch Stadium

Before he chronicled the Cardinals’ first division title-clinching since 2015, Post-Dispatch baseball writer Derrick Goold helped save a man’s life Sunday at Busch Stadium.

St. Louis-based videographer Mike Flanary, 64, collapsed in the Cubs’ dugout before the game and was briefly without a pulse before CPR was performed by Goold, a longtime former lifeguard and Eagle Scout trained in CPR. After receiving further medical attention from the Cubs’ training staff and then emergency medical personnel, Flanary was transferred to Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Medical officials said Flanary, who was working for a Chicago television affiliate for Sunday’s game, was in “critical but stable” condition after suffering a heart attack and then a stroke.

Cardinals’ security director Phil Melcher, asked about Goold’s immediate assistance, said it was “huge. You cannot discount that, at all. I absolutely thanked him.”

Washington University’s Dr. David Tan, the stadium doctor on duty Sunday at Busch, said, “So many people are afraid of doing CPR. But, because of (Goold’s) actions, he was the first link in that chain of survival.

“It’s fabulous. It was the early CPR by Derrick Goold that probably saved his life. Derrick wasn’t afraid. He didn’t hesitate. And he did it.

“In the medical field, when you save somebody like this, they call it a clinical save. This is a clinical save that was started by Derrick Goold. Period.”

Bill Hayes, a registered nurse who was on duty as a supervisor, said, “Somebody said, ‘Does somebody know CPR? And Derrick said, ‘I do.’

Goold had just entered the dugout area just before the Cubs were to announce the dismissal of Joe Maddon as manager.

 

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Learn To Save a Life In 4 Hours – CPR Training, Are You Prepared?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

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Chick-fil-A Employee Saves Man’s Life with CPR in Parking Lot: ‘It Was Like Instinct Took Over’

A Chick-fil-A in California is serving up more than just poultry — it’s offering life-saving customer service, too.

An employee at the chain’s Chula Vista location is being celebrated as a hero after his quick-thinking CPR helped save a man in cardiac arrest.

Tauya Nenguke, 22, was working the Chick-fil-A drive-thru on Sept. 11 when he noticed a man lying unconscious beside his car around 8:30 p.m., according to local ABC affiliate KGTV.

As the restaurant explained in a Facebook post, Nenguke quickly handed his iPad for orders to a co-worker and “sprinted across the parking lot to find a man down with his scared friends frantically not knowing what to do.”

Nenguke, who recently took nursing classes, began doing chest compressions on the 20-year-old victim, local Fox affiliate KSWB reports.

“He wasn’t breathing or anything, his eyes were rolled back into his head,” he told KGTV. “I know this guy was out, [but] I didn’t know how long. I just started chest compression immediately.”

Nenguke even taught the man’s friend how to do CPR, and the two alternated until emergency crews arrived.

His fast action was later credited with helping save the young man’s life.

“There wasn’t any hesitation on my part. I knew that was the place where God placed me at the time,” he said.

Nenguke reportedly hopes to go to nursing school, and said the incident was a clear sign that he’s on the right path.

“This was truly a real big eye-opener to my calling to be in health care because at the moment, it was like instinct took over,” he said.

He’s worked at the restaurant as a team leader since March 2018, according to KSWB.

 

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Source: https://people.com/human-interest/chick-fil-a-employee-saves-mans-life-cpr-parking-lot/


Y employees use AED to save life

Critical seconds tick away. Training takes over. Josh Eckstein, a lifeguard at the Southeastern Indiana YMCA, knew what to do while on duty one morning in late July when he saw a Y member start to go under the water, says marketing coordinator Kathleen Bohman.

He immediately put the YMCA emergency protocols into action, pulling the member out of the water to perform CPR while Connie Fledderman, Welcome Center staff member, called EMS and came to assist Eckstein with the automated external defibrillator.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests happen outside of hospitals each year, and 90 percent of Americans who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. However, the American Heart Association estimates that properly administered CPR can triple a person’s odds of survival. Sadly, only 46 percent of cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander.

“I had no idea what was in store for me as I swam my regular laps that day,” recalls the Y member. “My heart stopped beating. Had this happened to me anywhere other than the Y, I may not be here to be able to talk about my good outcome.”

Y executive director Angie Harmeyer says, “In addition to our lifeguards being certified by the American Red Cross, we require all YMCA staff to be first aid/CPR/AED trained within the first 30 days of employment, followed by regular recertifications and in-service trainings. Providing a safe environment for our members and guests is everyone’s job. That also means being prepared.”

Why is CPR/AED training important?

  1) By performing simple procedures and following certain guidelines, it may be possible to save lives by giving basic treatment until professional medical help arrives.

 2) In an emergency, there’s no time to read instructions.

3) If you’ve memorized some of the basic procedures, it will help you react quickly and efficiently.

4) It can make the difference from complete recovery and permanent disability.

5) It can help save a life.

“Josh and Connie showed exactly why we put such an emphasis on CPR training for all city employees, companies and the general public who are eager to be certified,” said Batesville Fire Chief Todd Schutte. “Through their immediate response and actions, the patient survived the incident and is on the road to a full recovery.”

 

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Source: https://www.batesvilleheraldtribune.com/news/local_news/y-employees-use-aed-to-save-life/article_0d8867d8-c376-11e9-a09b-37d70bfea96b.html