MY SECOND LIFE – Meat market owner saves customer’s life with CPR

Fred Bivins says he wouldn’t be alive today if Gary Szotko of Lewandoski’s Market didn’t know exactly what to do.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Friday, Nov. 12 started off like a normal day for Fred Bivins. The proprietor of Vinecroft Studios was trying to make room in the studio freezer for a Thanksgiving turkey. He pulled out some macaroni and cheese and thought it would go well with some smoked kielbasa from Lewandoski’s Market.

Owner Gary Szotko wasn’t scheduled to be at Lewandoski’s that day. But he was filling in for one of his employees when Fred came in. The two began to chat for about 15 minutes. On his way out, Fred returned to the counter and Gary knew something was wrong. “Fred’s eyes just rolled right into the back of his head. So I knew what was happening,” Gary said. Fred hit the floor. While first responders were on their way, Gary began CPR. It’s a skill he learned during his 28 years serving on the Grand Rapids Fire Department.

We know that medically, any chances of survival are much greater the sooner you start CPR,” Gary said. “I called back to my son, Alex, who was working that night. I told him to call 911, which he did.” In minutes, first responders from Rockford Ambulance and Grand Rapid Fire Department Station #3 on Bridge Street, where Gary spent much of his career, were at Lewandoski’s to take over. “I ended up getting shocked five times somewhere between here and the hospital,” Fred said.

Fred spent the next three and a half weeks at Spectrum Health’s Meijer Heart Center. He doesn’t remember much of that stay, and he almost didn’t make it. He said Dr. Glenn VanOtteren and Spectrum’s critical care team helped nurse him back to health.

“One doctor said you were dead before he hit the floor, and the only thing that got you back was Gary. He knew how to do CPR, and that’s what saved my life” Fred said. On Dec. 8, at the urging of Dr. Sampson Ho, Fred was transferred to Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital just down the street, where he was treated for damage done to his body when he hit the floor, and during CPR compressions. “You don’t save a life without cracking bones, and I’ll trade the broken ribs for my life. I’ll never be upset that Gary did that to me,” Fred said. “Mary Free Bed is full of miracle workers. They honestly are, and I’m just grateful to all of those people.”

Fred says his doctors agree, he wouldn’t be alive to tell his story if Gary had not began CPR right away. So when Fred got out of Mary Free Bed right before Christmas, his first stop was at Lewandoski’s Market to thank the man who saved his life.

Fred Bivins meets with Gary Szotka just before Christmas after Szotka saved Bivins life in November. “I have a second chance at life because of this man, and there was no way I was going to go home from the hospital without stopping to thank him. And I’ll thank him every day of my life of my second life,” Fred said. The two cried together during the reunion, which was a surprise to Gary. “It was surreal, because I didn’t know Fred was coming. I looked up and Fred’s here. Yeah, just a big hug, and big cry. But I’m just very thankful, very blessed, and very grateful.”

Now, Fred is trying to pay it forward. He’s raising money to help buy an AED, automated external defibrillator, for the store. People who want to help can send money via PayPal to fred@vinecroft.com.

Meanwhile, Gary is going to make sure everyone who works at Lewandoski’s is CPR certified. Both Gary and Fred hope people who see this story would be moved to learn CPR for themselves.

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Source: https://www.wzzm13.com/article/news/local/grand-rapids-west/owner-of-lewandowskis-market-on-west-side-of-grand-rapids-michigan-saves-man-suffered-from-heart-attack-by-peforming-cpr/69-570cb048-47dd-4a91-b4f6-3239492c114b


Why Employees Need First Aid Training

 

Whether the workplace is an office or a construction site, it has two common traits — valuable employees who may be injured or become ill and the need to protect them with adequate first aid procedures.

The good health and resulting productivity of employees is one area that is often overlooked as a means of improving a company’s profitability. The size of this opportunity is indicated by a National Safety Council estimate that in 1997, there were more than 80 million lost workdays due to unintentional injuries. The astounding cost to American businesses was $127 billion, or an average of $980 per worker.

Whether employees work in a high-hazard or low-hazard environment, they face a variety of risks. Shock, bleeding, poisonings, burns, temperature extremes, musculoskeletal injuries, bites and stings, medical emergencies, and distressed employees in confined spaces are just a sampling of the first aid emergencies which might be encountered in your business. These risks are compounded when employees don’t feel well. Their lack of concentration can result in costly injuries.

If your employees aren’t prepared to handle these types of injuries on all shifts and their coworkers are left untreated until an ambulance arrives, a victim’s condition may worsen and injuries can become far more debilitating, which leads to greater medical costs and lost productivity.

It makes good business sense to provide first aid and appropriate training to all your employees. By making such a minimal investment in keeping your employees safe and well-trained, you could net big returns, along with a competitive advantage. Moreover, it’s the law.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires businesses to provide first aid and CPR training to employees in the absence of a nearby clinic or hospital. While safety always begins with prevention, not every work-related injury can be prevented. Your primary first aid training goal should be to give employees the necessary tools and information they need to care for an ill or injured person, if necessary until advanced help arrives.

“The outcome of occupational injuries depends not only on the severity of the injury but also on the rendering of first aid care,” writes OSHA in its 1991 Guidelines for Basic First Aid Training Programs. “Prompt, properly administered first aid care can mean the difference between life and death, rapid vs. prolonged recovery, and temporary vs. permanent disability.” Since each site is so different, OSHA requires first aid training to be specific to the needs of the workplace. Proper training varies with the industry, number of employees, and proximity to emergency care.

Although OSHA’s 1991 guidelines specify the requirements for a first aid program, OSHA does not teach or certify programs. Therefore, employers are faced with numerous programs to choose from, and the choice can be difficult. Because of this, a consensus group comprised of a panel of government and private experts developed the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings in 1997.

This new and detailed curriculum identifies the skill training that makes a workplace first aid responder competent to provide care. Responding to OSHA’s requirement that every employer provides first aid assistance in the workplace, these guidelines document the minimum knowledge and skills necessary for an individual to provide basic life support care to an ill or injured person until professional emergency response arrives.

While starting a first aid program can be simple and inexpensive, it involves several essential steps:

Recognize that it is your responsibility as an employer to determine the requirements for your first aid program. As you assess your workplace, be mindful of the job site or work process that could cause illness or injury to employees. What types of accidents could reasonably occur in your workplace? Consider such things as falls, hazardous machinery, and exposure to harmful substances. Be sure to put your evaluation in writing for reference purposes. Remember that, while OSHA does not recommend nor approve programs, it may evaluate your program’s adequacy during an inspection.

Powered Industrial Truck Safety

Assess the location and availability of a medical facility to your workplace. If a hospital, clinic or other such emergency response is not readily available, for instance, within three to four minutes, you must have at least one employee trained in first aid and CPR per shift. There is no recommended number of trained employees to have on staff; it largely depends on your facility’s size and type of operations. Responding in a timely manner can mean the difference between life and death, so it is crucial that you have an appropriate number of employees trained.

For organizations in multiple sites, such as construction operations, a larger number of employees must be trained. Many experts believe all employees should know how to provide first aid and CPR to ensure that help is always at hand. At a minimum, each department or location should have a responder available on each shift.

Make sure you have suitable first aid supplies readily available at all times. Effective Aug. 17, 1998, OSHA added an Appendix A to its very basic First Aid and Medical standard found in 29 CFR 1910.151. It requires the employer to reference ANSI Z308.1-1978, Minimum Requirements for Industrial Unit-Type First Aid Kits.

According to OSHA, the contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small worksites. However, larger or multiple operations should consider the need for additional first aid kits and additional types of first aid equipment and supplies in larger quantities. OSHA suggests consulting a local fire and rescue department appropriate medical professional or first aid supplier for assistance in these circumstances.

FA Cabinet

OSHA recommends you periodically assess your kit and increase your supplies as needed. Place your first aid supplies in an easily accessible area, and inform all your employees of its location. Along with a well-stocked, workplace-specific first aid kit, other basic supplies normally include emergency oxygen, blankets, stretchers, directional signs, eyewash stations and burn stations.

In addition to these items, if blood-related incidents are anticipated, you must provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) as mandated in OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). It lists specific PPE for this type of exposure, such as gloves, gowns, face shields, masks, and eye protection.

On-site safety inspections, review of hazards and emergency dispatch, assessment, implementation, escape and treatment should be discussed in your training program. Employees must be trained to act and think quickly to avoid delayed treatment during an emergency. Ask yourself, whether each employee knows how to report an injury or illness.

Outline the accident investigating and reporting procedures and relay that to your employees as part of your company’s policy. Early recognition and treatment of an injury or illness is essential.

Employees must be aware of emergency contact information. It is best to post emergency procedures and emergency office contact numbers with your first aid supplies or in another highly visible and accessible area. Make sure that your field personnel also have suitable supplies and office contact numbers readily available. Appoint an employee in each department to watch for hazards and evaluate its current first aid status. Set a deadline to report any hazards or first aid needs to a manager or supervisor for improvement or correction.

Since people tend to forget their first aid training over time, OSHA recommends refresher training be conducted to recharge employees’ knowledge of first aid procedures. At a minimum, employees should be certified annually to perform CPR and once every three years to perform first aid. If such training sounds burdensome, consider that it can produce safer work practices and fewer incidents among employees.

Keeping the workplace safe involves three basic elements: steps to prevent or minimize accidents, adequate first aid supplies and proper first aid training. The employer uses training to make sure its employees know what to do, how to do it and who is in charge in case a first aid or emergency situation occurs. Proper first aid training not only satisfies OSHA requirements, but fosters good will among employees, who recognize the care that their company expends to provide a safe and healthy environment for its most valuable asset: its employees.

 

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Source: https://www.ehstoday.com/news/ehs_imp_33547


Learn Life Saving CPR Now – You Never Know When You Will Need It

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team-building opportunity!

 

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More than half of workers aren’t trained on First Aid, CPR

About 10,000 cardiac arrest situations occur in the workplace each year, yet only 45 percent of U.S. employees have been trained in first aid – and only 50 percent of workers know where to find an automated external defibrillator

– according to the results of a survey recently conducted by the American Heart Association.

Researchers surveyed more than 3,000 workers in various industries, including more than 1,000 safety managers in OSHA-regulated industries. They found that 50 percent of workers overall – as well as 66 percent in the hospitality industry – could not locate their workplace’s AED. Results also showed that more than 90 percent of participants said they would take first aid and CPR/AED training if their employer offered it, and 80 percent said that it was “simply the right thing to do.”

 

 

Other findings:

  • 73 percent of office employees believe a co-worker would know how to provide first aid in an emergency, and 70 percent of general industry workers reported the same.
  • 66 percent of workers in education believe a co-worker would know how to use an AED if the situation called for it, and 57 percent of office workers reported the same.
  • 68 percent of office workers rely on a co-worker to know how to administer CPR.

“The data suggests these untrained employees may be relying on their untrained peers in the event of an emergency, leaving employees with a false sense of security that someone in the workplace will be qualified and able to respond, when that is clearly not the case,” Michael Kurz, co-chair of the AHA Systems of Care Subcommittee, said in a June 19 press release. “First aid, CPR and AED training need to become part of a larger culture of safety within workplaces.”

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/15886-more-than-half-of-workers-arent-trained-on-first-aid-cpr-survey


Firefighters share the importance of an AED

 

Les Morgan’s life was saved by the quick response of those around him earlier this year. The 60-year-old firefighter with Schuylkill Hose Company No. 2 and borough resident responded to smoke in a structure and was handing his son, who is also a firefighter, a fire extinguisher when suddenly he was on the floor not breathing normally.

Les Morgan was suffering a cardiac arrest

EMS, firefighters and Schuylkill Haven Police Department officers all had a hand in saving Les Morgan. Kyle Morgan didn’t know everyone who helped save his father’s life, but trusted they knew what to do while he waited outside.

“He was down for less than two minutes,” Morgan said.

Within that time, 90 seconds of CPR was given and Morgan was shocked with the AED, which reads your heart rhythm and determines if a shock is needed. It then gives procedural instructions.

“A lot of people are afraid they are going to hurt someone,” by using the AED, Kyle Morgan said.

Every minute CPR is not given, the survival rate drops by 10 percent, according to the AHA.

About 70 percent of sudden cardiac arrests occur at home, while the remainder occur in public settings and nursing homes, according to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

Source: Standard-Speaker

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Only 1 in 5 adults are CPR certified – Get certified now and help save a life

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

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3 Reasons Everyone Should Learn CPR

* 900 Americans die every day from Sudden Cardiac Arrest

* 95% of victims die before reaching a hospital

* 4 minutes – Brain death starts to occur within 4 minutes

(The average response time of EMS is 8 minutes)

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPR, AED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Click Here For more information on CPR

Click Here For more information on AED’s


First Aid Requirements For Your Businesses

OSHA requires businesses to provide  CPR training and First Aid to employees in the absence of a nearby clinic or hospital (OSHA Standard 1910.151).

While safety always begins with prevention, not every work-related injury can be prevented. Your primary first aid training goal should be to give employees the necessary tools and information they need to care for an ill or injured person, if necessary, until advanced help arrives.

OSHA does not teach or certify programs. Therefore, employers are faced with numerous programs to choose from, and the choice can be difficult. Because of this, a consensus group comprised of a panel of government and private experts developed the National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings in 1997.

This detailed curriculum identifies the skill training that makes a workplace first aid responder competent to provide care. Responding to OSHA’s requirement that every employer provide first aid assistance in the workplace, these guidelines document the minimum knowledge and skills necessary for an individual to provide basic life support care to an ill or injured person until professional emergency response arrives.

 

While starting a first aid program can be simple and inexpensive, it involves several essential steps:

1. Recognize that it is your responsibility as an employer to determine the requirements for your first aid program. As you assess your workplace, be mindful of the job site or work process that could cause illness or injury to employees. What types of accidents could reasonably occur in your workplace? Consider such things as falls, hazardous machinery and exposure to harmful substances. Be sure to put your evaluation in writing for reference purposes. Remember that, while OSHA does not recommend nor approve programs, it may evaluate your program’s adequacy during an inspection.

2. Assess the location and availability of a medical facility to your workplace. If a hospital, clinic or other such emergency response is not readily available, for instance, within three to four minutes, you must have at least one employee trained in first aid and CPR per shift. There is no recommended number of trained employees to have on staff; it largely depends on your facility’s size and type of operations. Responding in a timely manner can mean the difference between life and death, so it is crucial that you have an appropriate number of employees trained.

For organizations in multiple sites a larger number of employees must be trained. Many experts believe all employees should know how to provide first aid and CPR to ensure that help is always at hand. At a minimum, each department or location should have a responder available on each shift.

3. Make sure you have suitable first aid supplies readily available at all times.Click here to see current ANSI Standards

Effective Aug. 17, 1998, OSHA added an Appendix A to its very basic First Aid and Medical standard found in 29 CFR 1910.151. It requires the employer to reference ANSI Z308.1-1978, Minimum Requirements for Industrial Unit-Type First Aid Kits.

According to OSHA, the contents of the kit listed in the ANSI standard should be adequate for small worksites. However, larger or multiple operations should consider the need for additional first aid kits and additional types of first aid equipment and supplies in larger quantities. OSHA suggests consulting a local fire and rescue department appropriate medical professional or first aid supplier for assistance in these circumstances.

4. OSHA recommends you periodically assess your kit and increase your supplies as needed. Place your first aid supplies in an easily accessible area, and inform all your employees of its location. Along with a well-stocked, workplace-specific first aid kit, other basic supplies normally include emergency oxygen, blankets, stretchers, directional signs, eyewash stations and burn stations.

In addition to these items, if blood-related incidents are anticipated, you must provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) as mandated in OSHA’s Blood-borne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030). It lists specific PPE for this type of exposure, such as gloves, gowns, face shields, masks, and eye protection.

5. On-site safety inspections, review of hazards and emergency dispatch, assessment, implementation, escape and treatment should be discussed in your training program. Employees must be trained to act and think quickly to avoid delayed treatment during an emergency. Ask yourself, whether each employee knows how to report an injury or illness.

Outline the accident investigating and reporting procedures and relay that to your employees as part of your company’s policy. Early recognition and treatment of an injury or illness is essential.

Employees must be aware of emergency contact information. It is best to post emergency procedures and emergency office contact numbers with your first aid supplies or in another highly visible and accessible area. Make sure that your field personnel also have suitable supplies and office contact numbers readily available. Appoint an employee in each department to watch for hazards and evaluate its current first aid status. Set a deadline to report any hazards or first aid needs to a manager or supervisor for improvement or correction.

Since people tend to forget their first aid training over time, OSHA recommends refresher training be conducted to recharge employees’ knowledge of first aid procedures. At a minimum, employees should be certified annually to perform CPR and once every three years to perform first aid. If such training sounds burdensome, consider that it can produce safer work practices and fewer incidents among employees.

Keeping the workplace safe involves three basic elements:

  1. Steps to prevent or minimize accidents
  2. Adequate first aid supplies
  3. Proper first aid training.

The employer uses training to make sure its employees know what to do, how to do it and who is in charge in case a first aid or emergency situation occurs. Proper first aid training not only satisfies OSHA requirements, but fosters goodwill among employees, who recognize the care that their company expends to provide a safe and healthy environment for its most valuable asset: its employees.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid Specialist

Click Here to learn more about First Aid

 

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Risks of performing CPR – What you need to know.

The American Heart Association consistently supports and promotes CPR classes for people not in the medical profession—so when someone has a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital or medical facility, there will be a higher chance of a bystander stepping in to perform lifesaving CPR while the victim waits for emergency response teams to arrive.

Studies show that brain death begins within four to six minutes after a cardiac arrest, and those who do not get CPR within that time are extremely likely not to survive. Getting CPR immediately—and if you’re not in a hospital, that usually means from a bystander—could mean the difference between life and death.

First, whether or not you can be sued will vary depending on where you are and who you are. The 2000 Federal Cardiac Arrest Survival Act grants those who administer CPR or use an AED immunity from civil charges, except in instances of willful misconduct or gross negligence.

Good Samaritan laws exist on a state-by-state basis. Mostly, they provide at least some protection for those who perform CPR or use an AED. Some states actually require you to step in if you know CPR or, in some cases, if you are a medical professional. In Vermont, for instance, requires bystanders to give “reasonable assistance” or face a $100 fine.

Generally, however, Good Samaritan Laws are there to protect bystanders who perform CPR. Mostly, you are required to ask permission before performing CPR if a person is not already in your care. If they cannot reply, then consent is implied.

You will not be protected by Good Samaritan laws if you try to go outside your area of training—if you try to perform an impromptu tracheotomy to save a choking victim, for example, and you are not a trained surgeon. If your behavior has been judged to be reckless or negligent, or if you leave the victim after initially providing care, you could also be sued.

If someone has a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order that specifies lifesaving care must not be provided in case of a sudden cardiac arrest or another health crisis, you must do as it says and avoid giving CPR—if you know about it. If you didn’t know about it, you generally can’t be prosecuted for giving lifesaving CPR anyway. But what about first aid? Medical professionals and lay-rescuers often ask if they can be sued for first aid? Generally, the answer is the same, you can’t be prosecuted for giving first aid to someone in need and you are not required to do so if you feel uncomfortable about it. Be sure to practice good faith and common sense if you ever end up in a situation where someone might need CPR or first aid.

Medical professionals who give CPR to people with a DNR order can potentially be in trouble—if they know about the DNR. The issue of giving CPR to someone with a DNR is complicated, however. In some states, DNR orders are only valid inside a hospital setting; outside the hospital, they do not apply. This means that an emergency response team can legally give someone CPR even if they have a DNR order. In other states, however, emergency medical responders are allowed to abide by DNR orders when responding to emergency calls in the victim’s home.

In addition, in some states, patients who move from one healthcare facility to another are required to tell their medical teams about the DNR.  Usually, medical professionals are not required to abide by a DNR order they do not know about.

The truth is that you can be sued for anything, at any time. The question is not whether you can be sued for performing CPR; the question is whether you can be successfully sued. The answer in most cases is no; Good Samaritan laws in most states protect bystanders from legal consequences if they act prudently and in keeping with their training. Hopefully, widely publicized cases of people being refused CPR will not keep non-medical citizens from getting certified for CPR—and providing lifesaving care if it is required.

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CPR Training Saves Baby

Clarintje Kopra, a St. Maarten Academy high school graduate and one of the volunteers of Red Cross St. Maarten, used her CPR training on March 23 to save the life of a four-month-old baby girl when she did not wake up from her nap. Despite the emotions, Kopra, a teaching assistant in a day-care centre, remained focused and confident during the emergency situation.

With her mother always encouraging her to remain a volunteer, she remembered what she had been taught, administered CPR and had the baby breathing again by the time the ambulance arrived.

The first-aid-certified volunteer said after the incident that she felt great because she had saved a life. Red Cross St. Maarten said this week on its social media page that it is proud of Kopra and encourages her to keep up the amazing work.

Source: The Daily Herald

Click Here to learn about CPR and CPR Certification

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