Cardiac arrest survival increase when bystanders use an AED

According to a recent study in the Circulation Journal Report, Survival from cardiac arrest doubled when bystanders stepped in to use a publicly available automated external defibrillator rather than waiting for emergency responders to arrive.

The study showed that the longer it takes to emergency personnel to arrive, the greater the benefit of a bystander using an AED to shock the victim.

Victims who received a defibrillator shock from a bystander had far greater chances at survival and being discharged from the hospital than those that did not.

  • Bystanders used an AED in 18.8% of these cases.
  • Cardiac arrest victims who received a shock from a publicly-available AED had far greater chances of survival and being discharged from the hospital than those who did not; 66.5% versus 43%.
  • Cardiac arrest victims who received a shock from a publicly-available AED that was administered by a bystander had 2.62 times higher odds of survival to hospital discharge and 2.73 times more favorable outcomes for functioning compared to victims who first received an AED shock after emergency responders arrived.
  • Victims who received an AED shock from a bystander (57.1%) using a publicly-available device instead of having to wait for emergency responders (32.7%) had near normal function and better outcomes.
  • Without a bystander using AED shock therapy, 70% of cardiac arrest patients either died or survived with impaired brain function.

To learn more about CPR and AED’s contact your UniFirst First Aid + Safety representative for more information.


Woman who collapsed in Publix restroom saved with CPR

Renee Gold (Pictured left) and Kamilla Soares (right). Photo courtesy of myPalmBeachPost

Kamilla Soares, who recently became a paramedic was next door to Publix when she received an alert on her phone that someone needed CPR.

Kamilla, and a Publix Customer Service Manager Renee Gold performed life saving CPR.

Renee Gold found the woman in the bathroom stall.

“I had to pull her out from underneath. I had 911 on the phone, and they were telling me to check, ‘Was she breathing?’” Gold said. “She was gasping for air.”

Gold began doing CPR when Soares arrived. Together with the help of 9-1-1 dispatcher they performed CPR until Palm Beach Gardens Fire and Rescue arrived.

The woman was later released form the hospital.

”You guys definitely went above and beyond,” said Cory Bessette, Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue Division Chief of EMS. “Whether you’re medically trained or not, you can do CPR.”

Source: myPalmBeachPost


Starbucks barista performs CPR

Natasha Stapp, a barista at Starbucks stepped forward to perform CPR on a stranger when Chris Smith collapsed on the sidewalk out front of the store.

“One of the things that I love the most is being able to change somebody’s day,” Stapp said

Chris Smith suffered what is nicknamed the Widowmaker Heart Attack. It is a heart problem so deadly, that only about 5% of individuals with it survive. They Widowmaker is when 95% or more blockage occurs in the main artery that supplies the front wall of the heart. If left untreated, it causes the entire firing wall of the heart to die.

Thanks to Natasha’s actions and the help of the 9-1-1 operator, Chris Smith is alive to today.

“The details seem kind of homely, but my wife and I were able to celebrate a 52nd wedding anniversary and I watched two of our grandkids graduate. None of that would have happened if Natasha wouldn’t have been there. Without her CPR work, there wouldn’t have been anything for the paramedics to revive,” said Smith.

Source: Kens5


Teen’s quick acting saves life with CPR

Nineteen year old Hannah Evans was at home getting ready to leave for work. When she looked outside and saw family friend Becky Garverick, who had been helping Hannah’s parents cut their lawn. Suddenly Hannah saw Becky collapse to the ground.

Hannah rushed out to the yard and checked for a pulse and immediately began chest compressions. She called 911 and continued with chest compressions.

“At one point while doing CPR, I lost Becky’s pulse. But I just kept going,” she explained.

Hannah is a nursing student at NC State in Mansfield. She learned CPR while attending Pioneer Career and Technology Center as a medical technology student.

Hannah had never performed CPR on an actual person until that day, and if she hadn’t been trained to do so, Becky Garverick knows she would not be here today.

Source: Galion Inquirer


Man saves wife’s life with CPR

APPLETON, WI (WBAY/CNN) – Andrea Benrud is alive and well thanks to her husband, Luke, and his knowledge of CPR.

Luke Benrud took a CPR class so he knew to call 9-1-1 and then started CPR until EMS arrived.

“I just remembered chest compressions are most important and you would have to do them harder than you would think you’d have to do them. Especially when it’s your wife, you don’t want to hurt her,” Benrud explained.

“Seeing somebody else giving her CPR and then somebody else hooking her up to the defibrillator, shocking her, that’s when it all starts to hit me, the gravity of the situation,” he recalled.

The Joplin Globe


Hockey goalie makes a different kind of save

Oliver Urrego sprang into action March 1 when an opposing player collapsed on the ice during an adult league hockey game at Twin Rinks Ice Pavilion in Buffalo Grove.

While the goaltender on Napholz’s team, Mike Tuntland, started CPR, Urrego, 33, took charge of the life-or-death situation. He told other players to get the automated external defibrillator (AED), which the rink installed years ago.

Urrego gave Napholz chest compressions, then used the AED to revive him. It was the first time he used an AED.

This was the second time in a year the Oliver Urrego used CPR to save a life. In 2017 he and his wife performed CPR on his father-in-law who went into cardiac arrest in the couples home.

Source: Daily Herald


Wife saves her firefighter husbands life with CPR

Luke and Jessica Pichette (Photo courtesy of KHQ)
Luke and Jessica Pichette (Photo courtesy of KHQ)

Jessica Pichette and her husband Luke were getting ready for bed when the unthinkable happened.

Jessica did chest Jessica says her husband began making strange sounds, she thought he was having a stroke. “I started dialing 911 at that time, kind of rolled him of over and at that time he a big deep breathe and then he was gone, he was not breathing, his eyes were rolled back,” Pichette said.

Jessica did chest compressions for six minutes until sheriff’s deputies, firefighters and EMS arrived and took him to the hospital.

Jessica hopes that more people will learn the crucial skill of CPR.

Source: KHQ


Who says music doesn’t save lives?

In an effort to help train first responders in hands-only CPR, New York Presbyterian Hospital has released a 40-song playlist whose beats per minute match the number of chest compressions.

Most people are familiar with The Bee Gees’ 1977 hit – and aptly named – Stayin’ Alive which took the number one spot.

Artists from Beyoncé to Justin Timberlake to ABBA also had songs on the set list.

Scroll down to listen to the playlist

Bee Gees
Bee Gees

On a 40-track playlist released by New York Presbyterian Hospital, Stayin’ Alive by the Bee Gees came out as the best song to perform CPR to

TOP 10 SONGS FOR SAVING LIVES

  1. Stayin’ Alive – Bee Gees
  2. Cecilia – Simon and Garfunkel
  3. Hard to Handle – The Black Crowes
  4. Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  5. Rock Your Body – Justin Timberlake
  6. I Will Survive – Gloria Gaynor
  7. MMMBop – Hanson
  8. Gives You Hell – The All-American Rejects
  9. Heartbreaker – Mariah Carey ft Jay Z
  10. Another One Bites the Dust – Queen

Stayin’ Alive, the disco hit made popular by the movie Saturday Night Fever, has a rhythm of 103 beats per minute.

This is close to the recommended rate of at least 100 chest compressions per 60 seconds that should be delivered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Additionally, doctors say, the song is well known enough to be useful in teaching the general public to effectively perform the lifesaving maneuver.

The 40-song list, which has a duration rate of two hours and 28 minutes of CPR jams, also includes songs like ABBA’s Dancing Queen and Beyoncé’s Crazy in Love.

Pop fans can enjoy tracks from Missy Elliot and Justin Timberlake, while alt-rock aficionados can choose from Fall Out Boy or the All-American Rejects.

Despite the number of times CPR ‘saves’ someone’s life on TV, it has an abysmal success rate in real life.

Only about eight percent of CPR patients are saved by the procedure, even when backup help is called immediately.

Those who’ve had to be saved with CPR are likely to experience other painful injuries, as well, such as crushed or ruptured organs.

However, performing CPR more than doubles the survival rate of patients who go into cardiac arrest.