More people might survive cardiac arrest if more bystanders tried hands-only CPR

More lives could be saved after cardiac arrest if bystanders applied cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), even if it’s just the hands-only version, a new study suggests.

With hands-only CPR emerging as an alternative to the traditional method – chest compressions coupled with mouth-to-mouth rescue breaths – Swedish researchers decided to investigate the impact of the simpler method.

They found that when rates of either type of CPR increased, the chances of surviving a sudden cardiac arrest doubled.

“In this nationwide study (we saw) an almost six-fold higher proportion of patients receiving compression-only CPR,” said co-author Dr. Jacob Hollenberg, director of the Centre for Resuscitation Science at the Karolinska Institutet. “Any type of CPR was associated with doubled survival rates in comparison with cases not receiving CPR before EMS arrival.”

It’s currently unknown whether CPR including mouth-to-mouth rescue breaths when performed by bystanders is superior to the simpler hands-only method, Hollenberg said in an email. There is an ongoing large randomized controlled trial to answer that question, he added.

Hollenberg suspects more people would be willing to learn hands-only CPR than the traditional method.

For the study published in Circulation, Hollenberg and his colleagues analyzed all out-of-hospital bystander-witnessed cardiac arrests reported to the Swedish Register for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation between 2000 and 2017. Altogether the researchers had data on 30,445 patients.

The proportion of patients receiving CPR from bystanders grew from 40.8 percent in 2000-2005 to 68.2 percent in 2011-2017. The proportion who got standard CPR was 35.4 percent in the earlier period and 38.1 percent in the later period. But over the same time, the proportion who got hands-only CPR rose from 5.4 percent to 30.1 percent.

 

During the nearly two decades covered by the study, survival rates improved for both groups of patients. Thirty-day survival after standard CPR rose from 9.4 percent to 16.2 percent, and after hands-only CPR it rose from 8.0 percent to 14.3 percent.

Overall, compared to patients who didn’t get any kind of CPR from bystanders, those who got standard CPR before first responders arrived were 2.6 times as likely to survive to 30 days and those who got hands-only CPR were twice as likely to survive 30 days.

The study shows that any kind of CPR is better than no CPR, said Dr. Clifton Callaway, vice chair of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. “This is a tremendously robust data set,” Callaway said. “They’ve been able to track this for many, many years.”

The American Heart Association has been popularizing hands-only CPR, Callaway said. “The message they’re trying to convey is that if you don’t choose to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, you can still do chest compressions and help somebody with cardiac arrest,” he said, noting that mouth-to-mouth is still required for other conditions, such as drowning.

The reason hands-only can work is that when people experience a cardiac arrest, they still have oxygen in their lungs, Callaway said. “Chest compressions will buy you some time until someone comes to get the heart started again,” he said.

The other advantage to hands-only CPR is that 911 operators can talk you through it even if you haven’t had any training, Callaway said. “Dispatchers should be able to coach anybody to do chest compressions and provide this potential to sustain life until professional help arrives,” he added. “In my mind, there’s no reason we can’t have 60 to 80 percent of Americans who have had a cardiac arrest receiving assistance from bystanders.”

 

 

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Source: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-cpr/more-people-might-survive-cardiac-arrest-if-more-bystanders-tried-hands-only-cpr-idUSKCN1RD37U


Teen learned CPR at a JoCo high school. Two weeks later, he used it to save his dad

When Olathe East High School students got their state-mandated CPR training this winter, freshman Seth Johnson couldn’t fully participate because of a broken collarbone. 

But he was paying close attention.

Two weeks after the training, Seth, his arm still in a sling from a lacrosse injury, helped his older sister, Claire, use CPR to save their dad when he went into cardiac arrest.

Call it a hands-on follow-up lesson.

“Just do whatever it takes,” Seth, 14, said he learned. “Don’t be too scared to do CPR if it’s happening.”

Seth and Claire, an Olathe East senior, were both home Feb. 15 because of a snow day.

Their 52-year-old father, Mark, was in the kitchen making lunch when he told Seth he suddenly wasn’t feeling well. He sat down on the couch, but then things got worse.

“He was kind of grunting and I didn’t know what was going on, so I just yelled his name and he wouldn’t respond,” Seth said.

Hearing the yells, Claire ran in, and the two of them pulled their dad off the couch and laid him flat. He wasn’t breathing. Claire told Seth to call 911, and then she started CPR.

Claire had the same training course at Olathe East but also had been CPR certified as a lifeguard her sophomore year. She knew what she was doing, but after about four minutes of heavy chest compressions she was spent, and Seth had to take over.

“It was really exhausting,” said Claire, 18. “I couldn’t imagine doing it anymore. If Seth wasn’t there I would have (tried), but it helped a lot that he was.”

About two minutes later the paramedics arrived and took over, doing chest compressions and shocking Mark three times with an automatic external defibrillator.

He spent five days in the hospital, but has since made a full recovery.

“I went to the gym with him just the other day actually,” Claire said.

Claire and Seth both said their dad’s brush with death has brought their family closer. They spend more time together now and they don’t take for granted that they will always have one another.

 

Mark said he doesn’t remember much from that day. But he does remember waking up in the hospital and being told the story several times as he tried to get reoriented. Every time, he got emotional thinking about his kids’ poise under pressure.

He said a relative’s father had died years earlier under similar circumstances.

“Basically he had a heart attack at home and his wife and daughter were there and they didn’t really know what to do and they lost him,” Mark said. “Thankfully my kids had learned CPR — my son just two weeks earlier. Everything was a miracle.”

The American Heart Association has lobbied for CPR training in schools, and as of last year 38 states — including Kansas and Missouri — had enacted laws requiring it. Kansas’ law was passed in 2017, but some school districts had been doing the training long before that.

Sudden cardiac arrest kills almost 350,000 victims every year, and causes brain damage in an unknown number of people who survive it.

Recent studies have shown that CPR saves less than 20% of people in that situation, but experts say it’s still worth trying, and the earlier it’s administered the more successful it’s likely to be.

In the last two years most emergency dispatch systems in the Kansas City area have connected themselves to PulsePoint, a smartphone app that alerts CPR-certified users when someone near them is in cardiac arrest.

Claire and Seth said they encourage others to get CPR training, and not be afraid to put it to use.

“Always jump into action,” Claire said. “Even if it doesn’t end up working, at least you tried.”

 

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Source: https://www.kansascity.com/news/business/health-care/article229269669.html


71-year-old man saves best friend’s life with AED, CPR after heart attack

It was a normal day..

Bill Winness was walking his normal route through the Western Mall with his two friends the morning of April 5 when one started to feel dizzy. He urged Winness to keep going while he sat and rested for a bit.

Just minutes later, a woman came running after the 71-year-old and his friend, Ray Smidt, to tell them that their friend, Keith Clark, was suffering a heart attack.

They ran back as fast as they could. The next thing Winness knew, he was grabbing the Automated External Defibrillator (AED) inside the building while Smidt ran to Clark’s aid. Winness was by Clark’s side instantly after grabbing the AED.

Winness was trained how to use the AED, an electronic device that diagnoses a cardiac arrest, and how to apply electricity in the event of one, in addition to CPR training years ago. All he remembered were the basics, but that was enough.

Winness doesn’t remember panicking, just taking the steps he needed to save his best friend’s life.

“I guess you just do whatever you have to do, you know? You don’t really think about it,” Winness said.

The first step in using the AED was to apply adhesive strips to Clark’s chest for the AED to read what should be done. Since Clark had a pacemaker, the AED just instructed Winness to give CPR. He started chest compressions while another bystander stood on the line with a 9-1-1 dispatcher.

What Winness did helped provide the necessary oxygen to Clark’s brain and helped his heart pump blood while they waited for emergency responders.

It was only minutes, but what he did was vital to preserving Clark’s well-being, according to Scott Christensen, director of clinical service for Patient Care EMS.

“It buys time,” Christensen said. “That time it takes for someone to call for help until first responders arrive, it’s important for someone trained in CPR to give that type of care and assistance. All of that together is what helped save Keith’s life.”

If Winness wasn’t there to give CPR before units arrived, Christensen speculated that Clark might have passed away.

Clark, 81, was released from the heart hospital Friday. He’s in relatively good condition and was advised by his doctor to “lay low” for a few weeks.

This was Clark’s second heart attack, and he’s been suffering episodes for half his life. Winness and Clark talked about what they would do if this happened. They were prepared as much as they could be.

“We all knew where the defibrillator was mounted. We walk by it every day,” Clark said. “I think everybody should know CPR. It probably doesn’t hurt if everybody knew where these AEDs were either.”

Bystanders in Sioux Falls helped give CPR for 73 percent of cardiac arrests in 2017, according to Regional Emergency Medical Services Authority.

It’s common for bystanders to take action in Sioux Falls, just as Bill took charge to help Clark. Nationally though, the REMSA registry’s average is action from bystanders in 38 percent of cardiac arrests.

Part of that is because of wide CPR training in the Sioux Falls area and because of dispatchers instructing 9-1-1 callers how to give CPR. The high rate of bystander help can also be attributed to Sioux Falls Fire Rescue’s Pulsepoint app, which alerts people when CPR is needed nearby.

“Any CPR is better than no CPR,” Christensen said.

For AEDs, it’s 28 percent of bystanders who intervene with the device in Sioux Falls. About 11 percent of bystanders across the registry intervened with an AED in 2017.

There isn’t a standard on how to provide signs for AEDs, Christensen said. Clark worries there needs to be better ways to inform people where the AEDs are — it could mean life or death.

 

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Source: https://www.argusleader.com/story/news/crime/2019/04/09/71-year-old-man-saves-best-friends-life-aed-cpr-after-heart-attack/3380193002/


Ohio pizza employees use CPR to save co-worker’s life

Gibson Gaynesbloom, 63, went into cardiac arrest March 5 while working at a Little Caesars in New Philadelphia, the television station reported.

His co-workers sprang into action. Keralyn Songer, 34, called paramedics. Nicole Strong, 35, who told WJW she learned CPR in high school, cleared Gaynesbloom’s air passage and put him on his back. Brody Ferris, who learned CPR last summer — “I only had three lifeguarding classes at the YMCA,” he told WJW — also helped out.

Strong continued mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until paramedics arrived, the television station reported.

Gaynesbloom was taken to a hospital and had emergency surgery that saved his life, WJW reported. He is expected to make a full recovery.“They essentially started to save my life. Thank you so much. Thank you all and thank you, everyone,” Gaynesbloom told the television station. “I’ve got children and grandchildren. I want to see them grow up.”

Andrea Tyson, who owns the pizza shop, threw a party for the trio Friday and gave them gift cards, WJW reported.

“The conversation I had with the three of them was that I believe that if one of them was not trained in CPR, then I don’t think he would be here today. I know he wouldn’t be here,” Tyson told the television station.

 

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Source: https://www.ajc.com/news/ohio-pizza-employees-use-cpr-save-worker-life/1aRlJkF2H2n9rHWM29jIOM/


One day you might just need it – CPR/First Aid Training

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

 

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity!

 

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Life saving First Aid/CPR lessons – We come to you

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes – November 26th – 30th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Need different dates?

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First Aid/CPR Training just in time for the holidays

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes – November 19th – 23rd

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Need different dates?

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Confused about First Aid in the workplace? This quick read will help…

First Aid in the workplace

Employers are required by OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.151 to have a person or persons adequately trained to render first aid for worksites that are not in near proximity to an infirmary, clinic, or hospital.

It is advised that the first-aid program for a particular workplace be designed to reflect the known and anticipated risks of the specific work environment. Consultation with local emergency medical experts and providers of first-aid training is encouraged when developing a first-aid program. The program must comply with all applicable OSHA standards and regulations.

 

First-aid supplies must be available in adequate quantities and be readily accessible. Click here for First Aid Kit requirements.

First-aid training courses should include instruction in general and workplace hazard-specific knowledge and skills.

CPR training – OSHA requires certain employers to have CPR-trained rescuers on site. Sudden cardiac arrest is a potential risk at all worksites, regardless of the type of work. Serious consideration should be given to establishing a workplace AED program and should incorporate AED training if an AED is available at the worksite. First-aid training should be repeated periodically to maintain and update knowledge and skills. Management commitment and worker involvement is vital in developing, implementing and assessing a workplace first-aid program.

Click on the link below for the full OSHA publication

https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3317first-aid.pdf

 

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Learn How To Save A Life – First Aid/CPR Classes for Corporations

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes – November 5th – 9th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Need different dates?

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

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CPR/First Aid – Corporate Classes October 22nd – 26th

CPR/First Aid  – Corporate and Group Classes October 22nd – 26th

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2 year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

Need different dates?  Just give us a call!

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

Click Here to learn more about CPR/First Aid training

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

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