CPR/First Aid Training – Now available online

Anyone can learn CPR, is your team ready to save a life?

UniFirst First Aid + Safety/UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, our CPRAED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees on how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

Can we take the course online?

Absolutely! You can now take your class online, this allows for more flexibility for your schedule and also provides an alternative option to reduce in-person class time. After students pass the online portion we will come to your location to conduct “Skills Checks” which takes typically less than an hour for up to 10 students, we follow the CDC and AHA COVID-19 guidelines and will adhere to any specific requirements you may have beyond the CDC and AHA guidelines.

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Have You Been Putting Off Getting Your Team CPR Trained?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPR, AED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

We follow the CDC and AHA guidelines for COVID-19 recommendations while conducting all in-person training courses.

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Responding to Cardiac Arrest in the Workplace

Recent surveys have revealed a significant lack of training and preparedness for responding to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) incidents in U.S. workplaces.

A survey by the American Heart Association concluded that many American workers do not have access to emergency care training, nor do they know the location of their employer’s automated external defibrillator (AED). That knowledge would go a long way towards positively impacting the 10,000 SCA incidents that occur in the workplace each year.

According to a Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation article on the study:

More than half (55 percent) cannot get first aid or CPR+AED training from their employer – and even if employers do offer this training, it’s often either one or the other.
Half of all U.S. workers (50 percent) cannot locate the AED at work. In the hospitality industry, that number rises to two-thirds (66 percent).

A second survey was deployed to a group of “more than 1,000 safety managers in industries regulated by the U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA),” which revealed that:

One-third (33 percent) of safety managers said lives have been saved at home and at the workplace as a result of first aid, CPR, and AED training provided at work – and three-quarters (75 percent) said injuries or medical conditions have been treated in the workplace with this training.
More than one-third (36 percent) felt it would be valuable to offer training more frequently than every two years (the current requirement).

Younger generations at OSHA-regulated industries were less likely to participate in first aid, CPR, and AED training, although the numbers are still high at over 44 percent.

As part of our mission to “Make the Workplace and Community Safer,” UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid & Safety offers a number of emergency care training solutions to businesses of all sizes.

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Firefighter knows the value of an AED firsthand

Les Morgan knows because his life was saved by the quick response of those around him Feb. 18. The 60-year-old firefighter with Schuylkill Hose Company No. 2 and borough resident responded to smoke in a structure and was handing his son, who is also a firefighter, a fire extinguisher when suddenly he was on the floor not breathing normally.

Les Morgan was suffering a cardiac arrest

EMS, firefighters and Schuylkill Haven Police Department officers all had a hand in saving Les Morgan. Kyle Morgan didn’t know everyone who helped save his father’s life, but trusted they knew what to do while he waited outside.

“He was down for less than two minutes,” Morgan said.

Within that time, 90 seconds of CPR was given and Morgan was shocked with the AED, which reads your heart rhythm and determines if a shock is needed. It then gives procedural instructions.

“A lot of people are afraid they are going to hurt someone,” by using the AED, Kyle Morgan said.

Every minute CPR is not given, the survival rate drops by 10 percent, according to the AHA.

About 70 percent of sudden cardiac arrests occur at home, while the remainder occur in public settings and nursing homes, according to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

 

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Source: Standard-Speaker


His heart stopped for 19 minutes. CPR saved his life.

 

We’ve all heard it; CPR can mean the difference between life or death.

“You can be very young, you can be very old, it does not matter. Cardiac arrest does not discriminate and can affect anyone at any time,” says Gabrielle Purick, Program Administrator for Keep the Beat, Mecklenburg County.

Sudden cardiac arrest is when a person’s heart suddenly stops beating. It strikes people of all ages who seem to be healthy, including children, making it the 3rd leading cause of death in the U.S.

It’s different than a heart attack in that a person who goes into cardiac arrest passes out, is unresponsive and unable to breathe on their own.

Sudden cardiac arrest is extremely fatal, it takes over 90 percent of the lives it affects,” which is why Purick said CPR is so crucial to survival.

“For every one-minute that someone is on the ground having a cardiac arrest without help their chance of survival goes down 10 percent,” she said.

It’s also why Omar’s case is such a testament to the power of CPR. Paramedics with Mecklenburg County EMS say this September Omar, a healthy 28-year old, went into sudden cardiac arrest. They say his heart stopped beating for 19 minutes.

“His case is actually what we aim for all of our cases to turn out as, so Omar got bystander CPR right away, got help on the scene, by the time our paramedics and EMT showed up, bystander CPR was being performed and now he’s alive and well today because of it,” said Purick.

Every year Mecklenburg County EMS transports more than 155-thousand patients.

But every so often, some of those patients return to thank the first responders who helped to save their lives. This December Omar and his family made a visit to MEDIC headquarters to meet the paramedics who helped to save him.

“Having patients come back and visit our teams that worked on them is personally my favorite part of getting to work here. We get to see Omar come back with his family, his child and his wife and really show the fruit of the labor that our employees work so hard to achieve,” said Purick.

He’s now sharing these special moments, showing how a life can be saved, by simply knowing CPR.

Purick says anyone can take free CPR classes through Keep the Beat. Keep the Beat is a joint initiative of Mecklenburg EMS Agency (Medic), Mecklenburg County, Atrium Health, and Novant Health that aims to reduce out of hospital cardiac mortality by increasing bystander CPR in Mecklenburg County.

The program offers free bystander CPR training, AED awareness and the PulsePoint app availability PulsePoint app is an app you can download to your phone, which sends out an alert when someone nearby is in cardiac arrest.

Purick says the county began using the app at the beginning of 2019 and already has more than 4,000 residents who have downloaded it.

According to MEDIC, more than 1,000 patients have survived and thrived after suffering sudden cardiac arrest in Mecklenburg County since 2010.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is extremely fatal, it takes over 90 percent of the lives it affects so to have 1000 people walking around our community who otherwise wouldn’t be is something we should be really proud of and it goes out to our community members who performed CPR before our people got there,” she said.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

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Source: https://www.wcnc.com/article/news/health/cpr-saves-lives/275-aaed30f6-895e-4218-8d87-f9f506191c94


Grocery Store Employee Saves Customer’s Life

Call it an early Christmas Miracle.

Kevin Garcia says he was waiting in line at the Save Mart at Willow and Nees in Fresno, when suddenly he keeled over with a heart attack. That’s when Garcia says his cashier ran around the counter to give him CPR, and saved his life.

“Everything’s fine, and I feel like I have a new chance at life – a new lease at life.”

56-year-old Kevin Garcia is looking for the cashier at SaveMart who saved his life when he had a heart attack last week. Guess what — we found him!

 

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We caught up with Garcia about five minutes before he was carted off to surgery at St. Agnes Hospital.

For a guy about to have heart surgery – boy was he spritely.

“The doctor told me, hey, you need to see a cardiologist. I didn’t disagree, I just scheduled the cardiologist for December 26th, which is a little bit far away, and I didn’t quite make it,” Garcia explained.

He didn’t make it to that cardiologist appointment, because he didn’t make it home from the grocery store last week.

And before you know it, my ears started ringing – and they’ve rung before, because they had some congestion and this was something that I felt – but this time it was different, and the congestion turned into what sounded like tinnitus with a jet engine.

Michael Perkins is an employee at that store and noticed something was wrong.

“Checking in this register right here, and I just heard this crash and I looked up. Things were going all over the place, and the lady right here said, ‘oh my god’ and she ran around. And I turned around, and this gentleman’s feet were right here, and he’d hit his head on the corner, and he was bleeding.”

Very luckily, before his days as a cashier, Perkins used to work at a hospital.

CPR means applying firm, consistent chest compressions. Doctors say it can be very exhausting to maintain.

Witnesses say that Perkins administered CPR for about five minutes.

“To be honest with you, it seemed like a couple of seconds. It happened, and it was over in the blink of an eye,” Perkins said.

Garcia says that if it weren’t for Perkins, he would not be here to tell his story.

There’s no other way to say it – he saved my life… That guy’s a hero, and I don’t know much about him – I know his name’s Michael. but I hope he gets some recognition, and I hope he’ll let me do a few nice things for him. I’ve got some really nice things in mind.”

Kevin’s father says that he’s out of surgery, doing just fine. He’ll have to take a little bit to recover.

 

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Source: https://kmph.com/news/local/fresno-grocery-store-cashier-saves-customers-life-after-he-suffered-a-heart-attack


Learn To Save a Life In 4 Hours – CPR Training, Are You Prepared?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid Training Specialist

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Chick-fil-A Employee Saves Man’s Life with CPR in Parking Lot: ‘It Was Like Instinct Took Over’

A Chick-fil-A in California is serving up more than just poultry — it’s offering life-saving customer service, too.

An employee at the chain’s Chula Vista location is being celebrated as a hero after his quick-thinking CPR helped save a man in cardiac arrest.

Tauya Nenguke, 22, was working the Chick-fil-A drive-thru on Sept. 11 when he noticed a man lying unconscious beside his car around 8:30 p.m., according to local ABC affiliate KGTV.

As the restaurant explained in a Facebook post, Nenguke quickly handed his iPad for orders to a co-worker and “sprinted across the parking lot to find a man down with his scared friends frantically not knowing what to do.”

Nenguke, who recently took nursing classes, began doing chest compressions on the 20-year-old victim, local Fox affiliate KSWB reports.

“He wasn’t breathing or anything, his eyes were rolled back into his head,” he told KGTV. “I know this guy was out, [but] I didn’t know how long. I just started chest compression immediately.”

Nenguke even taught the man’s friend how to do CPR, and the two alternated until emergency crews arrived.

His fast action was later credited with helping save the young man’s life.

“There wasn’t any hesitation on my part. I knew that was the place where God placed me at the time,” he said.

Nenguke reportedly hopes to go to nursing school, and said the incident was a clear sign that he’s on the right path.

“This was truly a real big eye-opener to my calling to be in health care because at the moment, it was like instinct took over,” he said.

He’s worked at the restaurant as a team leader since March 2018, according to KSWB.

 

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Source: https://people.com/human-interest/chick-fil-a-employee-saves-mans-life-cpr-parking-lot/


Y employees use AED to save life

Critical seconds tick away. Training takes over. Josh Eckstein, a lifeguard at the Southeastern Indiana YMCA, knew what to do while on duty one morning in late July when he saw a Y member start to go under the water, says marketing coordinator Kathleen Bohman.

He immediately put the YMCA emergency protocols into action, pulling the member out of the water to perform CPR while Connie Fledderman, Welcome Center staff member, called EMS and came to assist Eckstein with the automated external defibrillator.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests happen outside of hospitals each year, and 90 percent of Americans who experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrests die. However, the American Heart Association estimates that properly administered CPR can triple a person’s odds of survival. Sadly, only 46 percent of cardiac arrest victims get CPR from a bystander.

“I had no idea what was in store for me as I swam my regular laps that day,” recalls the Y member. “My heart stopped beating. Had this happened to me anywhere other than the Y, I may not be here to be able to talk about my good outcome.”

Y executive director Angie Harmeyer says, “In addition to our lifeguards being certified by the American Red Cross, we require all YMCA staff to be first aid/CPR/AED trained within the first 30 days of employment, followed by regular recertifications and in-service trainings. Providing a safe environment for our members and guests is everyone’s job. That also means being prepared.”

Why is CPR/AED training important?

  1) By performing simple procedures and following certain guidelines, it may be possible to save lives by giving basic treatment until professional medical help arrives.

 2) In an emergency, there’s no time to read instructions.

3) If you’ve memorized some of the basic procedures, it will help you react quickly and efficiently.

4) It can make the difference from complete recovery and permanent disability.

5) It can help save a life.

“Josh and Connie showed exactly why we put such an emphasis on CPR training for all city employees, companies and the general public who are eager to be certified,” said Batesville Fire Chief Todd Schutte. “Through their immediate response and actions, the patient survived the incident and is on the road to a full recovery.”

 

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Source: https://www.batesvilleheraldtribune.com/news/local_news/y-employees-use-aed-to-save-life/article_0d8867d8-c376-11e9-a09b-37d70bfea96b.html


Man makes ‘miracle’ recovery from heart attack after strangers perform CPR

On July 23, building contractor Brian Boos, JDW, Inc. service repair supervisor Darren Ebaugh and FerrelGas technician Shawn Kainz were all called to a home in rural Oak Creek to fix a family’s furnace. The three men say they have crossed paths on job sites before but were essentially strangers. They didn’t even know each other’s names.

“Everything was meant to be. It was one of those days. One of those moments that everything was meant to be,” Boos told FOX31.

Upon arriving to the job site, Kainz began complaining of chest pains. He told Boos and Ebaugh that he planned to see a doctor after finishing the work on the furnace regulator.

“I felt like I had heartburn. That’s all I remember,” Kainz said.

Ebaugh was putting his tools in his truck while Boos and Kainz stood together outside the home. That’s when Kainz collapsed.

“He didn’t grab his chest. He didn’t say, ‘Oh no.’ He just turned and [fell],” Boos said.

Boos attempted to call 911 and despite having an extremely weak signal in the rural area, he was able to connect with emergency dispatch. They helped talk Ebaugh and Boos through nearly 15 minutes of CPR until paramedics arrived.

“Just looking at his eyes, his eyes were glazed over. From being a hunter, I’ve seen it a lot and I knew what it meant. He was gone,” Ebaugh said.

“For sure there was no life,” Boos said.

The two never stopped CPR.

“The bystander CPR saved him. They kept him alive until we could get here,” Oak Creek Fire EMS supervisor Angela Bracegirdle told FOX31.

She has been with the department for 19 years. In that time, she says often bystanders will give up on CPR after about two minutes, if they even step in to help at all.

“Just keep going. Don’t stop. Because you never know,” Bracegirdle said.

Bracegirdle and her team were able to get Kainz’s heart restarted and he began breathing on his own before he was loaded into an ambulance. On the way to the hospital, she says he went into cardiac arrest again and regained a pulse after they used an AED (automatic electronic defibrillator) on him.

“It was a widow maker,” Kainz told FOX31. “It was 100-percent clogged coronary artery on the top right.”

He spent less than a week in the hospital before being released. He is now recovering and those around him say his progress is a miracle.

“Monday, [I got] the call, ‘He wants to have dinner with you.’ It just blew me away. I never would have imaged he survived,” Ebaugh said.

“It doesn’t look like he has a dent on his bumper. He looks like a million bucks. It’s a miracle,” Boos said.

“Yes, it is. It is. In my 19 years, I’ve only seen two walk out of the hospital,” Bracegirdle said.

Oak Creek Fire Chief Chuck Wisecup says in his 36-year career, this is the first time he has seen someone survive CPR.

“I think everyone needs to learn CPR,” Kainz said. “I think it’ll be a big awareness for everybody to learn CPR.”

Boos had taken a CPR class seven years prior. Ebaugh hadn’t taken one since he was in high school 25 years ago. They both say they now plan to be re-certified on a yearly basis.

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