NJ dads hailed as heroes after performing CPR at Paterson softball game

Two dads from Paterson, New Jersey are being called heroes after their weekend on the softball field assistant-coaching their daughters’ game nearly ended with one woman dead.

Thankfully, John Molina is a Paterson firefighter and retired Paterson Police Lieutenant Washington Griffin spent nearly 30 years on the force.

Molina was standing along the first baseline when shouting and panic ensued behind the bench of the opposing team. A woman believed to be in her 50s had stopped breathing.

“For a person to take their last breath in my arms, that’s when everything kicked in,” said Molina. “I saw her head fall back into the chair,” said Molina, who rushed over.

Griffin spotted what was going on from across the field.

“He was putting her on her back and clearing her airway. He said she went into cardiac arrest and so I jumped in and helped with chest compressions,” said the retired lieutenant.

The woman’s face was turning blue. Panic ensued and children and family looked on.

The ‘Lady Ballers’ softball team players are about 9 or 10-years-old.

But Molina and Griffin knew exactly what to do. Working as a team to perform CPR, they eventually detected a heartbeat. Paramedics arrived and rushed the unnamed woman to St. Joseph’s Hospital.

Today, both were reluctant to be called heroes.

“It’s my job, my duty so I’m not gonna say hero,” said Molina.

And to their children – they are surely seen as superheroes.

I told my daughter if she is in a position to help, she should help,” said Griffin, whose daughter is 9.

What happened to the woman that caused her to lose consciousness is not being released. But from what Molina and Griffin have been able to gather, they believe she is awake, talking and hopefully doing well.

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Source: https://pix11.com/2019/05/29/nj-dads-hailed-as-heroes-after-performing-cpr-at-paterson-softball-game/


Learn How To Save A Life – First Aid/CPR Classes for Groups & Corporations

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team building exercise.

 

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Her father died. But this Valley senior brought him back with CPR learned at school.

Something didn’t sound right to Brie Salloum as she was getting ready for school one morning in early April. Weird noises echoed in the upstairs hallway. She compares the sounds to elongated snores, or deep, muffled gurgles.

 

Brie walked into her parents’ bedroom and found her father, Ray, lying in bed and gasping for breath.

“His teeth were gritted, and he grimaced,” her mother, Lisa Salloum, said. “I could see we were losing him.”

What happened next, medical professionals have told the family, was the beginning of “a miracle.”

Brie Salloum is a senior at Valley High School who is set to graduate Sunday at Drake University’s Knapp Center with 595 of her peers. She is a quiet, reserved 18-year-old who enjoys video games, hanging out with friends, and working at the movie theater at Jordan Creek Town Center.

Salloum puts up with school because “it’s obligatory,” she quips, but admits she enjoys it. She’s taken several advanced placement courses at Valley — AP chemistry, AP physics, AP psychology — you name it.

Her favorite class, Valley’s certified nursing assistant course, is a full-year program that allows students to earn CNA certification by the end of the school year. It’s led by Andrea Thompson, Salloum’s all-time favorite teacher.

“She makes the classroom calm,” Salloum said. “She’s like a mom to me. I really appreciate her. She’s a phenomenal teacher.”

During the CNA program, students — typically those interested in the medical field — are introduced to a variety of health careers.

One section lets students learn about emergency care, like attending to fractures and burns as well as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, also known as CPR. Salloum and her classmates completed the required training this year and are all CPR certified.

‘They’re calling him a miracle’

Ray was lying limp in his bed. Lisa yelled at Brie to dial 911.

She was about to until she saw that her mom was already on the phone. She also saw her mom trying to give her father CPR and realized she wasn’t doing it properly.

She jumped into action.

“I took the pillow out from under his head, had her move him down a little a bit so his head wouldn’t be on the headboard. Then I just started,” she said. “I was crying and yelling. I was scared that I was doing it wrong and he was just gone. Especially with CPR, you don’t get that instant gratification. It was just scary.”

“I just kept telling her to keep going,” her mom said.

Emergency medical services arrived about 3 minutes later, Brie said. Ray was rushed to a local hospital.

He was placed in a medically-induced coma and underwent hypothermia treatment in order to preserve brain activity, Lisa said.

Almost 24 hours after doctors had cooled him, Ray had an arrhythmia, which is the improper beating of the heart.

“They had to give him a defibrillator and shock him,” Brie said.

“He had literally died twice,” Lisa added. “Once, when EMTs (emergency medical technicians) arrived at home and shocked him after what Brie did, and once at the hospital. His doctor told him, ‘It wasn’t your time to go because you’ve died twice and you’ve come back.’

“They’re calling him a miracle.”

Ray remained in the intensive care unit for 10 days.

‘It’s just a complete blur to me’

Ray returned home weeks later, on April 28. He continues to recover and rebuild his strength.

“A lot of it … it’s just a complete blur to me,” Ray said. “I’m slowly starting to remember some of it, little by little. All I remember is waking up in the hospital with a couple of my friends being there — and that’s after I had been there a couple of weeks.”

Doctors told the Salloums that Ray’s cardiac incident was a fluke, and that the chances of it happening again are less than 1 percent.

“Basically, it was all brought on by the flu and pneumonia,” Ray said. “A combination of your body losing fluids and your blood thickening because you lost fluids. Your lungs being congested, putting pressure on the heart. I really don’t know.”

If it weren’t for Brie’s heroic efforts, Ray’s outcome could have been much different. EMTs at the scene and physicians at the hospital complimented her on how she performed CPR.

“She’s very modest and humble,” Lisa said. “How many kids give their dad their life?

“There are not many people in this world — even those that are in the medical field — who can say that they’ve saved someone’s life.”

Brie will attend the University of Iowa in the fall. She’s enrolled as pre-med. She doesn’t yet know if she wants to become a nurse practitioner who works in the emergency room, or if she wants to be a surgeon.

Brie said she is appreciative of the education she received at Valley, especially the CNA program.

“I’m really grateful it’s part of Valley,” Brie said. “I think it’s a good stepping stone for me to get my feet wet in the medical field. Before I was iffy. Now, I know I want to do this.”

Her dad appreciates the program, too.

“I’m grateful. I’m thankful,” he said. “It’s amazing because of the timeline: When she went into the CNA program, when she learned CPR, and when this happened to me. It’s just so all relatively close together.”

 

 

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Source: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/local/community/2019/05/21/valley-high-senior-learned-crp-class-she-used-save-her-fathers-life/3754763002/

Recent CPR Certification Helps Save Life

On Friday, April 19, Albert Lea resident Ronald Laite was invited to work on a dock at Fountain Lake with friends. Just a regular days work, for a normally healthy 43-year-old, that almost turned deadly.

“A buddy called me up and asked if I wanted to help with a dock, and so I said sure and went down there. I felt something weird going on so I tried to pull myself towards the center and then next thing you know I’m in the hospital,” said Laite.

Officials said that Laite went into cardiac arrest which is commonly associated with a heart attack, yet the two are very different.

Cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death is an electrical problem of the heart. Basically where there is no effective heartbeat and no blood flow to the vital organs of the body. A heart attack is a circulation problem effectively where there is a blockage in one of the arteries that supply blood to the heart. So two different problems,” said Dr. Ammar Killu, who is a Cardiac Electrophysiologist at Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Killu said even though most of the people who learn how to perform CPR may never end up using it, just knowing what to do raises that persons’ chance of survival.

“Doing CPR which is basically chest compressions in this situation, helps get whatever oxygen is still in the body around to those organs. The quicker you can perform CPR the more effective the CPR is and the higher chances of survival, ” said Dr. Killu.

For chest compressions, you want to remember 30/2. 30 compressions to the chest about 2 inches in depth. You also want to administer about 120 compressions per minute.

Laite’s friend was just CPR certified two months ago, and he said that he never thought he’d have to use.

“I’m very thankful he got trained in CPR. he saved my life,” said Laite.

 

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Source: https://www.kaaltv.com/news/recent-cpr-certification-helps-save-life—albert-lea/5327525/


Teen learned CPR at a JoCo high school. Two weeks later, he used it to save his dad

When Olathe East High School students got their state-mandated CPR training this winter, freshman Seth Johnson couldn’t fully participate because of a broken collarbone. 

But he was paying close attention.

Two weeks after the training, Seth, his arm still in a sling from a lacrosse injury, helped his older sister, Claire, use CPR to save their dad when he went into cardiac arrest.

Call it a hands-on follow-up lesson.

“Just do whatever it takes,” Seth, 14, said he learned. “Don’t be too scared to do CPR if it’s happening.”

Seth and Claire, an Olathe East senior, were both home Feb. 15 because of a snow day.

Their 52-year-old father, Mark, was in the kitchen making lunch when he told Seth he suddenly wasn’t feeling well. He sat down on the couch, but then things got worse.

“He was kind of grunting and I didn’t know what was going on, so I just yelled his name and he wouldn’t respond,” Seth said.

Hearing the yells, Claire ran in, and the two of them pulled their dad off the couch and laid him flat. He wasn’t breathing. Claire told Seth to call 911, and then she started CPR.

Claire had the same training course at Olathe East but also had been CPR certified as a lifeguard her sophomore year. She knew what she was doing, but after about four minutes of heavy chest compressions she was spent, and Seth had to take over.

“It was really exhausting,” said Claire, 18. “I couldn’t imagine doing it anymore. If Seth wasn’t there I would have (tried), but it helped a lot that he was.”

About two minutes later the paramedics arrived and took over, doing chest compressions and shocking Mark three times with an automatic external defibrillator.

He spent five days in the hospital, but has since made a full recovery.

“I went to the gym with him just the other day actually,” Claire said.

Claire and Seth both said their dad’s brush with death has brought their family closer. They spend more time together now and they don’t take for granted that they will always have one another.

 

Mark said he doesn’t remember much from that day. But he does remember waking up in the hospital and being told the story several times as he tried to get reoriented. Every time, he got emotional thinking about his kids’ poise under pressure.

He said a relative’s father had died years earlier under similar circumstances.

“Basically he had a heart attack at home and his wife and daughter were there and they didn’t really know what to do and they lost him,” Mark said. “Thankfully my kids had learned CPR — my son just two weeks earlier. Everything was a miracle.”

The American Heart Association has lobbied for CPR training in schools, and as of last year 38 states — including Kansas and Missouri — had enacted laws requiring it. Kansas’ law was passed in 2017, but some school districts had been doing the training long before that.

Sudden cardiac arrest kills almost 350,000 victims every year, and causes brain damage in an unknown number of people who survive it.

Recent studies have shown that CPR saves less than 20% of people in that situation, but experts say it’s still worth trying, and the earlier it’s administered the more successful it’s likely to be.

In the last two years most emergency dispatch systems in the Kansas City area have connected themselves to PulsePoint, a smartphone app that alerts CPR-certified users when someone near them is in cardiac arrest.

Claire and Seth said they encourage others to get CPR training, and not be afraid to put it to use.

“Always jump into action,” Claire said. “Even if it doesn’t end up working, at least you tried.”

 

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Source: https://www.kansascity.com/news/business/health-care/article229269669.html


More than half of workers aren’t trained on first aid, CPR

About 10,000 cardiac arrest situations occur in the workplace each year, yet only 45 percent of U.S. employees have been trained in first aid – and only 50 percent of workers know where to find an automated external defibrillator

– according to the results of a survey recently conducted by the American Heart Association.

Researchers surveyed more than 3,000 workers in various industries, including more than 1,000 safety managers in OSHA-regulated industries. They found that 50 percent of workers overall – as well as 66 percent in the hospitality industry – could not locate their workplace’s AED. Results also showed that more than 90 percent of participants said they would take first aid and CPR/AED training if their employer offered it, and 80 percent said that it was “simply the right thing to do.”

 

 

Other findings:

  • 73 percent of office employees believe a co-worker would know how to provide first aid in an emergency, and 70 percent of general industry workers reported the same.
  • 66 percent of workers in education believe a co-worker would know how to use an AED if the situation called for it, and 57 percent of office workers reported the same.
  • 68 percent of office workers rely on a co-worker to know how to administer CPR.

“The data suggests these untrained employees may be relying on their untrained peers in the event of an emergency, leaving employees with a false sense of security that someone in the workplace will be qualified and able to respond, when that is clearly not the case,” Michael Kurz, co-chair of the AHA Systems of Care Subcommittee, said in a June 19 press release. “First aid, CPR and AED training need to become part of a larger culture of safety within workplaces.”

 

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Source: https://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/15886-more-than-half-of-workers-arent-trained-on-first-aid-cpr-survey


71-year-old man saves best friend’s life with AED, CPR after heart attack

It was a normal day..

Bill Winness was walking his normal route through the Western Mall with his two friends the morning of April 5 when one started to feel dizzy. He urged Winness to keep going while he sat and rested for a bit.

Just minutes later, a woman came running after the 71-year-old and his friend, Ray Smidt, to tell them that their friend, Keith Clark, was suffering a heart attack.

They ran back as fast as they could. The next thing Winness knew, he was grabbing the Automated External Defibrillator (AED) inside the building while Smidt ran to Clark’s aid. Winness was by Clark’s side instantly after grabbing the AED.

Winness was trained how to use the AED, an electronic device that diagnoses a cardiac arrest, and how to apply electricity in the event of one, in addition to CPR training years ago. All he remembered were the basics, but that was enough.

Winness doesn’t remember panicking, just taking the steps he needed to save his best friend’s life.

“I guess you just do whatever you have to do, you know? You don’t really think about it,” Winness said.

The first step in using the AED was to apply adhesive strips to Clark’s chest for the AED to read what should be done. Since Clark had a pacemaker, the AED just instructed Winness to give CPR. He started chest compressions while another bystander stood on the line with a 9-1-1 dispatcher.

What Winness did helped provide the necessary oxygen to Clark’s brain and helped his heart pump blood while they waited for emergency responders.

It was only minutes, but what he did was vital to preserving Clark’s well-being, according to Scott Christensen, director of clinical service for Patient Care EMS.

“It buys time,” Christensen said. “That time it takes for someone to call for help until first responders arrive, it’s important for someone trained in CPR to give that type of care and assistance. All of that together is what helped save Keith’s life.”

If Winness wasn’t there to give CPR before units arrived, Christensen speculated that Clark might have passed away.

Clark, 81, was released from the heart hospital Friday. He’s in relatively good condition and was advised by his doctor to “lay low” for a few weeks.

This was Clark’s second heart attack, and he’s been suffering episodes for half his life. Winness and Clark talked about what they would do if this happened. They were prepared as much as they could be.

“We all knew where the defibrillator was mounted. We walk by it every day,” Clark said. “I think everybody should know CPR. It probably doesn’t hurt if everybody knew where these AEDs were either.”

Bystanders in Sioux Falls helped give CPR for 73 percent of cardiac arrests in 2017, according to Regional Emergency Medical Services Authority.

It’s common for bystanders to take action in Sioux Falls, just as Bill took charge to help Clark. Nationally though, the REMSA registry’s average is action from bystanders in 38 percent of cardiac arrests.

Part of that is because of wide CPR training in the Sioux Falls area and because of dispatchers instructing 9-1-1 callers how to give CPR. The high rate of bystander help can also be attributed to Sioux Falls Fire Rescue’s Pulsepoint app, which alerts people when CPR is needed nearby.

“Any CPR is better than no CPR,” Christensen said.

For AEDs, it’s 28 percent of bystanders who intervene with the device in Sioux Falls. About 11 percent of bystanders across the registry intervened with an AED in 2017.

There isn’t a standard on how to provide signs for AEDs, Christensen said. Clark worries there needs to be better ways to inform people where the AEDs are — it could mean life or death.

 

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Source: https://www.argusleader.com/story/news/crime/2019/04/09/71-year-old-man-saves-best-friends-life-aed-cpr-after-heart-attack/3380193002/


Ohio pizza employees use CPR to save co-worker’s life

Gibson Gaynesbloom, 63, went into cardiac arrest March 5 while working at a Little Caesars in New Philadelphia, the television station reported.

His co-workers sprang into action. Keralyn Songer, 34, called paramedics. Nicole Strong, 35, who told WJW she learned CPR in high school, cleared Gaynesbloom’s air passage and put him on his back. Brody Ferris, who learned CPR last summer — “I only had three lifeguarding classes at the YMCA,” he told WJW — also helped out.

Strong continued mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until paramedics arrived, the television station reported.

Gaynesbloom was taken to a hospital and had emergency surgery that saved his life, WJW reported. He is expected to make a full recovery.“They essentially started to save my life. Thank you so much. Thank you all and thank you, everyone,” Gaynesbloom told the television station. “I’ve got children and grandchildren. I want to see them grow up.”

Andrea Tyson, who owns the pizza shop, threw a party for the trio Friday and gave them gift cards, WJW reported.

“The conversation I had with the three of them was that I believe that if one of them was not trained in CPR, then I don’t think he would be here today. I know he wouldn’t be here,” Tyson told the television station.

 

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Source: https://www.ajc.com/news/ohio-pizza-employees-use-cpr-save-worker-life/1aRlJkF2H2n9rHWM29jIOM/


The life saving skill you should know – CPR, are you ready to save a life?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity!

 

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Learning CPR/First Aid is easy; helping save a life is priceless…

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the 2015 AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the 2015 AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team building opportunity!

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid/CPR Specialist

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Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

#cprreadytosavealife

 

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