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Is your First Aid program compliant with the latest ANSI Standards?

ANSI (American National Standards Institute) Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies (ANSI Z308.1) establishes the minimum requirements for first aid kit supplies. First aid kits are classified based on the assortment and quantity of first aid supplies intended to deal with most types of injuries and sudden illnesses that may be encountered in the workplace.

5.1.1 Class A Kit’s

Class A first aid kits are intended to provide a basic range of products to deal with most common types of injuries encountered in the workplace including: major wounds, minor wounds (cuts and abrasions), minor burns and eye injuries. First aid kits designated as Class A shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

FA Small Cab

ANSI First Aid Standards

5.1.2 Class B Kits 

Class B kits are intended to provide a broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries encountered in more populated, complex and/or high risk workplace environments. First aid kits designated as Class B shall contain the assortment of compliant supplies in the quantities specified in the table below.

ANSI Class B Cabinet

For more information about First Aid Cabinet Service click here or Call: 800-869-6970


Apple Watch – It’s a life saver

18-year-old Deanna Recktenwald from Lithia, Florida, was at church on April 22 when she received a notification on her Apple Watch that her resting heart rate was extremely high. IT had jumped to 160 beats per minute up from her usual resting heart rate.

“The only symptom that I had was that I was out of breath from walking and standing and sitting so it kind of didn’t make much sense,” Recktenwald told ABC News.

Recktenwald’s mother, Stacey, a registered nurse, rushed her to an urgent care facility.

When the staff at the urgent care facility confirmed that her resting heart rate was at 190 beats per minute, Deanna was sent to her emergency room where doctors determined Deanna was in kidney failure.

Deanna received the Apple Watch a few months earlier at Christmas from her parents. The parents are very thankful for its ability to alert them to a condition that otherwise might have gone unnoticed.

“Now that we have some answers to why this is happening we can prevent something major from happening down the road,” said Deanna

Deanns’ mother Stacey wrote to Apple, explaining what happened and thanking the company fo that eApple Watch.

After about an hour the blood work came back and the doctors reviewed the results and told us that Deanna was in Kidney Failure. Her kidneys were only functioning at 20%. She had no symptoms of any kidney issues or any other medical issues. If it wasn’t for her Apple watch alarming her about her HR we wouldn’t have discovered her kidney issue.

I honestly feel that your Apple Watch has saved my daughter’s life. She is heading off for college in August and her condition may have been overlooked and if it wasn’t caught now the doctor said she would have needed a kidney transplant. I am forever grateful to Apple for developing such an amazing lifesaving product. Now I can send her off to college and know that she can monitor her HR and seek attention if it alarms her again.

Tim Cook responded via Twitter.

Source: ABC News

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Is your company in compliance with the new OSHA Silica Standard

OSHA’s new silica dust exposure standard went into effect September 23rd last year, but the agency delayed enforcement until Oct. 23 to give employers more time to comply. This is the first update to the silica standard since the first one was established in 1971, the same year OSHA was formed.

Silica dust particles are 100 times smaller than sand granules, and those who breathe in too much can develop illnesses like the incurable and potentially fatal lung disease silicosis, lung cancer, kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Respiratory Protection was the 4th most cited OSHA fine last year

Those employers not in compliance with the new rule could be hit with an OSHA fine of $12,675 for a serious or other-than-serious violation; $12,675 per day past the abatement date for a failure-to-abate violation and $126,749 for a repeated or willful violation. One organization was fined over $500,000 for non compliance.

OSHA CFR 1910.134 (f) (2)

“The employer shall ensure that an employee using a tight-fitting face piece respirator is fit tested prior to initial use of the respirator, whenever a different respirator face piece (size, style, model or make) is used, and at least annually thereafter”.

Need help with your respiratory program? 

Call Now: 800-869-6970          Click here to view respirators in our store

Click here OSHA silica rules

Click here for the OSHA Silica fact sheet

 

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Should you restrain a person having a seizure?

Approximately 1 out of 10 people have had a seizure. Because seizures are very common, it’s important to learn what to do to help keep that person safe until the seizure stops.

There are many types of seizures. Most seizures end in a few minutes.

These are general steps to help someone who is having any type seizure:

  • Stay with the person until the seizure ends and he or she is fully awake. After it ends, help the person sit in a safe place. Once they are alert and able to communicate, tell them what happened in very simple terms.
  • Comfort the person and speak calmly.
  • Check to see if the person is wearing a medical bracelet or other emergency information.
  • Keep yourself and other people calm.
  • Offer to call a taxi or another person to make sure the person gets home safely.

A seizure (fit) occurs due to excessive and disorganized electrical activity in our brain. A major seizure occurs when the victim falls to the ground and starts shaking uncontrollably. This is known as a tonic-clonic seizure or a grand mal seizure.

Victims of a major seizure are normally unconscious during the episode and not aware of their surroundings.

There are many myths about the correct first aid treatment for a victim having a seizure. One of these myths is around restraining a victim to stop them from injuring themselves – this is incorrect and potentially dangerous!

  • Do not hold the person down or try to stop his or her movements.
  • Do not put anything in the person’s mouth. This can injure teeth or the jaw. A person having a seizure cannot swallow his or her tongue.
  • Do not try to give mouth-to-mouth breaths (like CPR). People usually start -breathing again on their own after a seizure.
  • Do not offer the person water or food until he or she is fully alert.

Attempting to restrain the victim will not shorten the duration of the seizure or speed up the victim’s recovery. This myth has the potential to cause serious harm to a seizure victim.

The Correct First Aid Steps for a Seizure

The following first aid steps should be carried out for a victim having a major seizure (fit):

  • Call for emergency medical help
  • Move on any bystanders
  • Move away from any potential hazards from the victim and protect their head
  • Once the seizure finishes, roll the victim onto their side and ensure the airway is open and they are breathing
  • Don’t attempt to restrain the victim or place anything in their mouth
  • If the victim stops breathing then start CPR immediately and call for a defibrillator.

CDC Seizure First Aid

 

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Is the Apple Watch a Life Saver?

William Monzidelis says he is thankful to being alive today and that he owes it all to his Apple smart watch.

William was working at their family business, Bowlerland Lanes in Eastchester, a month ago when he passed blood in the bathroom. He says his latest model Apple Watch started going off almost instantly.

Doctors says that had William not gotten medical treatment as quickly as he did, he most certainly would have died.

“I was getting notifications from my watch telling me that I needed to seek medical attention immediately, my heart rate is going too high and too low, numbers that I’ve never had in my life,” William said.

Williams Mother Nancy recalls:

“I looked at his lips, they’re always pink like lipstick. ‘Your lips are white and blue, what’s going on?’. He said, ‘maybe I bled too much, my lips are never white and blue’,” Nancy said.

She got him in the car and drove to the hospital.

“When we got off the exit he started seizing, shaking his head, started projectile vomiting blood out of his mouth, his nose, wherever, then he passed out,” Nancy said. “His eyes rolled back and he was out.”

The Apple Watch is the most popular smart watch on the market today.

“I owe my life to that company, literally owe my life,” he said. “If I didn’t see that I would have gone back to my office, probably passed out, and that would have been it.”

William is still recovering from his ordeal. After two blood transfusions and an emergency endoscopy to cauterize the ulcer.

Source: CBS New York


Understanding Hi-Viz Apparel Requirements

WestChestergear.com VIZ UP - STAND OUT
WestChestergear.com VIZ UP – STAND OUT

ANSI/ISEA 107-2015

The first thing to understand is the ANSI/ISEA 107-2015 standard. This is a voluntary standard that provides guidelines on what qualifies as an approved fluorescent material; and what level of coverage and reflective tape are required to qualify as for various classes and types of garments.

This standard was designed for industries like utility, emergency responders, maintenance, construction, airport personnel and many roadside workers exposed to potential injuries due to low visibility on the job.

ANSI Hi-VIZ GARMENT CLASSES AND TYPES

ANSI 107 establishes four performance classes (Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, and Class E) and three garment types (Type O, Type R and Type P). Performance class and garment type are co-dependent, which means that to qualify under the ANSI standard, the apparel must have both a class and a type (not just one or the other).

Performance Class 1 offers the minimum amount of high-visibility materials needed to differentiate the wearer from non-complex work environments. On the other side of the spectrum is Class 3, which offers the greatest amount of high-visibility materials to allow for the best definition of the human form in both complex backgrounds and through a full range of movement. In addition, Class E describes pants or bibs that do not qualify as meeting the requirements of any of the other classes when worn alone, however when they are worn together with a Class 2 or Class 3 garment, the overall classification of the ensemble is Class 3.

Garment Type O is intended for work that takes place off-road or in controlled environments, such as parking lots, festivals, warehouses and factories. Garment Type R is intended for roadways or other environments with moving traffic or equipment, and is the minimum level of protection permitted for workers exposed to roadway rights-of-way, including roadway, construction, transportation, traffic-control, DOT, and airport ramp workers. This garment type represents the vast majority of hi-viz apparel on the market. Finally, Type P garments are intended for public safety workers, including emergency/incident response, police, fire, and EMS. Type P garments are permitted to be worn in the same environments as Type R garments, however they make accommodations for the additional gear required by those professions.

Contact UniFirst First Aid + Safety for a free consultation of your safety and PPE program.

Source: WestChester Gear