Meeting the Requirements for Emergency Equipment

 

For companies maintaining or considering emergency shower and eyewash stations, there are two key standards to remember.

The ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2014 American National Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment is an essential resource—visit ISEA’s www.safetyequipment.org website to order it. This important consensus standard outlines the minimum equipment performance criteria for this equipment. It specifies flow rates, water temperature delivery, testing, and much more.

Z358.1 is the leading international standard for the implementation of eyewash and shower equipment. On the standard’s page on its website, ISEA points out what a wide range of industries need to install and maintain this emergency equipment, listing “manufacturing and processing facilities, construction sites, laboratories, medical and healthcare offices, refineries and other workplaces.”

The other key standard is OSHA’s first aid standard, the one that explains the requirement for certain facilities in those and other industries to install shower or eyewash equipment. OSHA’s 29 CFR 1910.151(c) says, “Where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

End-users frequently ask what constitutes “immediate use.” Fortunately, ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2014 answers this question: It specifies that showers and eyewashes should be located within 10 seconds’ travel distance from a hazard. As Speakman Company’s Imants Stiebris explained in an article in the July 2018 issue of this magazine, “While in existing facilities it is fairly easy to measure 10 seconds with a stopwatch, engineers and architects who are designing facilities do not have this luxury; all that they have to work with are blueprints. To help these design professionals, the Z358.1 standard suggests that 55 feet is a distance that most persons can travel in 10 seconds or less. The victim’s physical condition and potential obstacles must still be taken into consideration.”

Meeting the Requirements for Emergency Equipment

The shower and eyewash units should be on the same level as the hazard requiring their use, in order to eliminate trips and the need for the affected worker to climb up or down. The units should be installed in a well-lit area and identified with a sign; if shut-off valves are installed in the supply line for maintenance purposes, the employer should prevent unauthorized shut off of the water supply.

The Z358.1-2014 standard also directs that the water temperature delivered to this equipment be “tepid,” which is defined as being between 60 degrees and 100 degrees Fahrenheit, so that the affected worker will be able to withstand the continuous flow for 15 minutes without the risk of scalding or hypothermia.

 

Employee Training and Equipment Testing
Shower and eyewash companies say there are six interrelated areas for managers of employers’ eyewash and shower programs to get right: performance, use, installation, testing, maintenance, and training.

Employees must be trained to hold their eyes open during the flushing process. All employees also should be trained on how to use the emergency equipment fixtures before they handle hazardous chemicals.

Showers should deliver at least 20 gallons per minute for a minimum of 15 minutes; for eyewashes, the required minimum is 0.4 gallons per minute. The equipment must activate in 1 second or less and then continue to operate hands-free.

Experts recommend designating one person as responsible for inspecting, operating, and documenting findings weekly for the shower, eyewash, and combination units and drench hoses, but for large facilities with multiple units, they recommend having a contractor or vendor do these tasks, in order to eliminate inconsistent checks because of vacations, sick days, etc.

Contractors should be familiar with the ANSI standard and be able to give a detailed report on any problems. The weekly check ensures flushing fluid is available at the correct temperature, pattern, and flow and also clears the supply line of sediments and minimizes the risk of microbial contamination caused by still, sitting water. During activation of plumbed showers, the equipment is to be checked for any visible damage, leaks, rust, and obstructed flow; the inspector is to ensure that spray nozzles are protected from contaminates and that protective caps and covers deploy easily, and the equipment continues to run until it is turned off.

Self-contained (gravity-fed) showers must be visually checked weekly to determine whether the flushing fluid needs to be changed or replenished, and they must be maintained according to the manufacturer’s instructions. All emergency showers must be inspected annually to make sure they meet the ANSI Z358.1-2014 performance requirements.

References
1. https://safetyequipment.org/product/ansiisea-z358-1-2014/
2. https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.151

 

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CPR – Do you know what to do?

CPR/First Aid – Corporate Classes

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team-building opportunity!

 

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Proper Disposal of Razor Blades in the Workplace

Razor blades are an essential part of many everyday business tasks. One of the crucial aspects of using them is to make sure that they are properly disposed of after they have become dull.

Razor blades are an essential part of many everyday business tasks. One of the crucial aspects of using them is to make sure that they are properly disposed of after they have become dull.

Hazards

Razor blades that are disposed of incorrectly can cause numerous hazards in the workplace. If they are left laying around, people can get stuck or stabbed by them, causing injury. Janitors and other maintenance personnel that collect garbage bags can be hurt by blades thrown into a trash can. These injuries can be prevented by putting used razor blades in the correct receptacle designed for the disposal of sharp items. Razor blades should be re-covered before disposal. Companies should begin by assessing when, how and where the blades are used and then outline disposal procedures.

 

Sharps Containers

Sharps containers are specially designed to hold needles, razor blades and other sharp objects that can expose others to injury or biohazards. These containers should be located near areas where such objects are commonly used. The boxes should also be within easy reach and readily recognizable to workers. Some sharps containers do not have to be emptied but have lids that self-lock when closed. The entire container can be disposed of as a whole but must be done according to federal guidelines.

Disposal

Sharps containers for the disposal of razor blades have to be sent to a facility to be emptied and returned sanitized. These containers should be closely watched so that they are changed out before they spillover, which can create hazards to workers. Setting up a monitoring schedule and ensuring that employees know the procedures for disposing of razor blades properly will help to make the workplace a safer environment.

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers a complete Sharps Waste System mail-back program with everything required to properly and safely package and dispose of your sharps waste.

 

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Source: https://homesteady.com/way-5745645-workplace-proper-disposal-razor-blades.html


Head Injury – What You Need To Know

Knowing the symptoms of a concussion and some simple first aid can help people respond to a head injury quickly, reducing the chances of complications.

Head injuries range from a bump on the head to a skull fracture. Some head injuries are severe enough to cause brain damage or even death.

Types

A head injury may present different symptoms.

There are a range of head injury types, and the injury can be more or less severe within each category.

traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when the brain is damaged, usually because of an accident. A person may have a TBI if an object hits their head, or if an object penetrates the brain through the skull.

Some examples include a ball hitting the head at high speed, falling from a great height onto the head, or having a gunshot wound.

Violent shaking of the head can also cause a TBI, as the brain can bounce or twist in the skull. These cases are often related to whiplash.

A TBI damages the brain, usually causing a blood clot or bruising. A blood clot in the brain is known as an intracranial hematoma (ICH).

An ICH can be more or less severe depending on its size and location in the brain.

A concussion is a form of TBI that temporarily stops the brain from functioning normally. Symptoms of a concussion are not always serious or long-lasting but may cause complications.

The skull is made of very hard, thick bone designed to protect the brain from injuries. However, it is possible to break or fracture the skull with a hard impact.

If the skull breaks and the bone or another object punctures the brain, a doctor will refer to the injury as an open head injury or penetrating head injury.

Symptoms

A head injury may present different symptoms depending on its severity.

Symptoms of a mild head injury include:

  • some bleeding
  • bruising
  • a mild headache
  • feeling sick or nauseated
  • mild dizziness

Symptoms of a moderate head injury include:

  • passing out for a short time
  • confusion or distraction
  • vomiting
  • a lasting headache
  • temporary changes in behavior
  • memory problems
  • loss of balance

Symptoms of a severe head injury include:

  • significant bleeding
  • passing out and not waking up
  • having a seizure
  • problems with vision, taste, or smell
  • difficulty staying alert or awake
  • clear fluid or blood coming out of the ears or nose
  • bruises behind the ears
  • weakness or numbness
  • difficulty speaking

Key symptoms of a concussion include:

  • confusion
  • a headache
  • dislike of noise or light
  • nausea
  • balance problems
  • blurred vision
  • feeling groggy
  • difficulty concentrating

Head injuries vs. minor bumps

A bump to the head is a common injury that does not usually cause serious problems. However, there is no clear point at which a doctor will class damage as a head injury.

It is usually possible to treat head injuries with mild or no symptoms at home. However, it is vital to know about the signs of a concussion and see a doctor if these develop.

When to see a doctor

Moderate and severe head injuries require immediate treatment. If the symptoms of a mild head injury last for more than 2 weeks, a person should also seek medical advice.

The symptoms of a concussion do not always appear immediately. Sometimes, a person may develop initial symptoms days or weeks after the injury.

People should always take head injuries seriously. If someone is concerned about their symptoms, even after a mild injury, they should speak to a doctor.

How do doctors diagnose a concussion?

A doctor will ask how the injury happened and about a person’s medical history. They will also look carefully at the head, face, and neck.

Concussions can often cause mental confusion. A doctor may ask questions or do tests to check a person’s memory, concentration, or problem-solving ability.

They may also use the Glasgow coma scale to diagnose a concussion. Doctors will examine and rate the following:

  • ability to open their eyes
  • ability to communicate
  • a motor response, such as bending an arm at the elbow

If a head injury is moderate or severe, it may be necessary to do a brain scan.

Treatment and first aid

A cold pack can help to reduce swelling.

People can often treat mild head injuries at home. Applying a cold pack to the area can help to reduce swelling.

A person can also take Tylenol but should avoid non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and aspirin, unless a doctor prescribes them.

In the first 24 hours after a mild head injury, a person should ask someone to check on them regularly.

If a person loses consciousness or shows signs of confusion or memory loss, it is vital to see a doctor.

A person should avoid using drugs or alcohol, driving, or playing contact sports after a head injury. They may need to take time off work or school.

Severe head injuries require immediate medical attention. Anyone who sees someone with symptoms of a severe head injury should call 911 or their local emergency number.

It is best not to move a person with a severe head injury to avoid making their injuries worse. People should also not attempt to remove a person’s helmet if they are wearing one.

Severe head injuries often require a stay in the hospital, surgery, or long-term treatment.

Prevention

Preventing head injuries is not always possible, but some steps can help reduce the risk. These include:

  • wearing a seatbelt when in a vehicle
  • wearing a helmet when cycling or using a motorcycle
  • following safety precautions when playing contact sports

A head injury can have lasting consequences, so it is essential to take precautions when necessary.

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Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322225.php

 


Active Shooter – What You Should Know….

What to do if you find yourself in an active shooting event, how to recognize signs of potential violence around you, and what to expect after an active shooting takes place.  Remember during an active shooting to RUN. HIDE. FIGHT.

Be Informed

  • Sign up for active shooter training.
  • If you see something, say something to an authority right away.
  • Sign up to receive local emergency alerts and register your work and personal contact information with any work sponsored alert system.
  • Be aware of your environment and any possible dangers.

Make a Plan

  • Make a plan with your family, and ensure everyone knows what they would do if confronted with an active shooter.
  • Look for the two nearest exits anywhere you go, and have an escape path in mind & identify places you could hide.
  • Understand the plans for individuals with disabilities or other access and functional needs.

During

RUN and escape, if possible.

  • Getting away from the shooter or shooters is the top priority.
  • Leave your belongings behind and getaway.
  • Help others escape, if possible, but evacuate regardless of whether others agree to follow.
  • Warn and prevent individuals from entering an area where the active shooter may be.
  • Call 911 when you are safe, and describe shooter, location, and weapons.

HIDE, if escape is not possible.

  • Get out of the shooter’s view and stay very quiet.
  • Silence all electronic devices and make sure they won’t vibrate.
  • Lock and block doors, close blinds, and turn off lights.
  • Don’t hide in groups- spread out along walls or hide separately to make it more difficult for the shooter.
  • Try to communicate with the police silently. Use text message or social media to tag your location, or put a sign in a window.
  • Stay in place until law enforcement gives you the all-clear.
  • Your hiding place should be out of the shooter’s view and provide protection if shots are fired in your direction.

FIGHT as an absolute last resort.

  • Commit to your actions and act as aggressively as possible against the shooter.
  • Recruit others to ambush the shooter with makeshift weapons like chairs, fire extinguishers, scissors, books, etc.
  • Be prepared to cause severe or lethal injury to the shooter.
  • Throw items and improvise weapons to distract and disarm the shooter.

After

  • Keep your hands visible and empty.
  • Know that law enforcement’s first task is to end the incident, and they may have to pass injured along the way.
  • Officers may be armed with rifles, shotguns, and/or handguns and may use pepper spray or tear gas to control the situation.
  • Officers will shout commands and may push individuals to the ground for their safety.
  • Follow law enforcement instructions and evacuate in the direction they come from unless otherwise instructed.
  • Take care of yourself first, and then you may be able to help the wounded before first responders arrive.
  • If the injured are in immediate danger, help get them to safety.
  • While you wait for the first responder to arrive, provide first aid. Apply direct pressure to wounded areas and use tourniquets if you have been trained to do so.
  • Turn wounded people onto their sides if they are unconscious and keep them warm.
  • Consider seeking professional help for you and your family to cope with the long-term effects of the trauma.

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Source: https://www.ready.gov/active-shooter


Less Than 20% Of Americans Are CPR Certified – Is Your Team Ready To Save A Life?

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

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5 Common Misconceptions About Defibrillator’s (AED’s)

An automatic external defibrillator (AED) can save lives.

AEDs provide access to life-saving care at your business, event, or public gathering and can be used by team members without the need for a medical degree. Unfortunately, many misconceptions about AED management often prevent people from installing or learning how to use one. It’s time to address these issues to make you and your employees or residents more comfortable with AED use.

 

Myth #1 – AEDs Are Hard To Use

Modern technology is pretty amazing, and that’s true when it comes to modern defibrillation devices. Instead of wading through a large instruction book to learn how to operate an AED in times of emergency, the staff is trained upon device installation in AED management. Even an untrained person could manage to use an AED, the technology is that user-friendly. Upon powering on an AED, the device itself provides walk-through instructions from start to finish. It’s virtually foolproof.

 

Myth #2 – I Will Be Held Liable If Something Happens

While it is a litigation-happy world, it is a myth that providing AED resuscitation assistance to a person will put you at risk for a lawsuit. Good Samaritan laws were put in place to offer just this kind of protection, prompting bystanders to take action that can greatly reduce further injury and even death.  Since only 8% of patients survive out-of-hospital cardiac incidents, defibrillation is encouragedAll jurisdictions in the United States provide some level of immunity to AED users, 60% require public access defibrillation maintenance, 59% require emergency medical service notification, 55% impose training requirements, and 41% require medical oversight. Understand more with  PlusTrac’s resource on AED Laws now.

 

Myth #3 – You’re Going To Shock Someone That Doesn’t Need It

In the year 2019 — this just can’t happen. Modern safety checks are built into each AED so that you can’t shock someone you’re not supposed to. Every AED analyzes the patient and looks for two specific rhythms indicating cardiac distress, the AED will only shock if the rhythm is found. Accidental shocking is now only part of Hollywood entertainment.

 

Myth #4 – Emergency Services Will Be Slower If We Have an AED

This myth is simply false. Emergency responders do not delay service based on AED presence. In fact, a registered AED can provide 9-11 responders additional resources to support you over the phone while you’re waiting for help to arrive. Operators can help you locate registered devices by guiding you through your building, and even help dispatch a volunteer responder if there is one nearby. This emergency treatment may help you buy the minutes needed to stabilize an injury while waiting for that ambulance to arrive.

 

Myth #5 – AEDs Are Expensive Equipment For a Very Rare Occurrence

Sudden cardiac arrest is a lot more common than most people think. Over 320,000 people experience these events outside a hospital each year, with very low survival rates. In a situation where every second count, AEDs can buy life-saving time. And this life-saving technology is affordable. Over a ten-year period, the average AED will cost about only about $130-$300 per year to own, as technology advances costs continue to improve for the value of what you purchase.

Don’t let the myths and misconceptions about AEDs prevent you from offering this safety net to your employees.

 

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Source: https://www.plustrac.com/plustrac-blog/5-common-misconceptions-about-aed-use?utm_content=95272284&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin&hss_channel=lcp-913526


Five Safety Tips that Impact Business

Follow these tips to create and maintain a strong safety culture that engages employees as part of the process.

It’s easy to turn a blind eye to safety when working in fast-paced environments and having to meet project deadlines. However, most manufacturing employers can attest to the turbulent outcomes that can arise if safety standards are not regularly enforced. Our everyday actions can have an impact on cost and productivity. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2,000 eye injuries occur every day in the workplace, costing more than $300 million in lost production time, medical expenses and worker compensation.

It’s clear that many companies are failing workers with insufficient safety programs and injury prevention plans. However, employers have the opportunity to turn this situation around with a few changes. Protecting employees doesn’t mean your organization has to start from square one. It does, however, require you to create a strong safety culture and open communication channels so employees can collaborate when it comes to hazard identification and problem-solving.

Here are five tips that operations managers, site managers, and safety coaches can use to start that dialogue:

1. Start from the top. Developing a healthy safety culture requires leadership to champion safety as a key organizational value. The company culture must include leading, working, and acting safely. When management leads in safety, the organization will follow.

2. Distribute safety surveys. When executing on your safety culture, it’s important to first find out what your employees know about your safety guidelines and expectations. Are they familiar with your corporate policies and procedures? Do they even know their own responsibilities when it comes to safety? This survey also serves as a great opportunity to get anonymous feedback on employees’ perceptions about safety in your workplace.

3. Conduct pre-shift huddles. This is a time when management can reinforce the safety culture by covering near-injury misses, newly identified hazards and educating staff on how proper processes and equipment handling can protect everyone’s health and safety. The goal of safety huddles is to also provide an open, non-punitive forum for employees to communicate about workplace safety.

4. One-on-one discussions. Supervisors can build trust and show respect for their workers’ safety by engaging associates in informal safety discussions. Associates who know that their opinions and perspectives are valued will be more likely to participate in informal communication about safety practices. This is also an ideal setting to gain feedback from employees who may not be comfortable bringing up concerns in front of a large group.

5. Perform ongoing safety training. Providing safety training for employees is essential for creating a culture of workplace safety. A workforce with a strong understanding of safety guidelines and best practices is more likely to recognize potential hazards before they occur. This can lead to fewer injuries and help you avoid costly losses in productivity and employee morale.

Some of the benefits of a safer and more engaged workforce include:

●       reduced workers’ compensation costs, lower medical expenses and improved productivity.

●       improved safety as a result of clear and repeatable processes for identifying and addressing hazards and injury threats.

●       stronger employer branding and positive outside perspective of the organization.

Impact on Employer Branding

Workplace safety should begin and end not only with workers in mind but with workers being engaged—actively participating and driving safety programs forward. High levels of employee engagement have also been correlated with greater productivity, quality, and profitability, as well as reduced turnover rates. It can also contribute to improved employee retention, and it even has the ability to impact recruiting, since job seekers will be able to learn about your culture of safety through online reviews. In today’s world, job seekers look to current and former employees’ experience to decide whether or not they want to work for a company.

 

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Source: https://www.ehstoday.com/safety/five-safety-tips-impact-business


CPR Training – A Great Team Building Exercise!

CPR/First Aid Training – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Looking for a Team Building opportunity? Learn to save a life while providing a great team-building exercise.

Schedule Your Class Now

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Every Second Counts – Emergency Preparedness

 

“Every Second Counts: Plan Two Ways Out” calls all of us to be aware of fire safety measures in the home.

According to the NFPA, “the synthetic fibers used in modern home furnishings, along with the fact that newer homes tend to be built with more open spaces and unprotected lightweight construction, all contribute to an increased rate at which fire burns.”

There are a variety of ways to take steps to make sure your home is fire safe, including:

  • Draw a map of your home with all members of your household, marking two exits from each room and a path to the outside from each exit.
  • Practice your home fire drill twice a year. Conduct one at night and one during the day with everyone in your home, and practice using different ways out.
  • Teach children how to escape on their own in case you can’t help them.
  • Make sure the number of your home is clearly marked and easy for the fire department to find.
  • Close doors behind you as you leave – this may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire.
  • Once you get outside, stay outside. Never go back inside a burning building.

Fire safety is important for everyone, especially for educators who interact with children on a daily basis. It is important for children to understand the dangers of fires, and to work with their family to devise a plan of escape. The NFPA website has many educational resources for schools including a fire prevention week banner, a coloring sheet, and a video series with Sparky the dog.

Check out the NFPA website where you will find fast facts about fires, a fire prevention week quiz, and can live chat with someone from the association to ask questions. Encourage your friends, family, and neighbors to take the quiz to test their knowledge on the danger of fires today. Ensure that the smoke alarms in your home function properly. If you do not have smoke alarms, install them as soon as possible.

 

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