It wasn’t his time:’ man performed CPR, saving life of neighbor in cardiac arrest

A man heard cries from his condo, and ran to help. He ended up saving his neighbor’s life!

After he heard screams coming from a nearby condo, Jeff Zilisch saw that his neighbor had collapsed. He used his CPR training to save him.

“It was being at the right place at the right time,” said Zilisch.

“My heart goes out to him,” said Tim Ridley, whose life was saved. “It’s just amazing.”

Tim Ridley

 

It happened in early August, as Zilisch cleaned his garage.

“Halfway across the parking lot, I realized, ‘Oh my gosh! This is not what I thought it was,'” said Zilisch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ridley was experiencing cardiac arrest. He was power washing his porch when he passed out.

“At that moment, I just had a cold rush from the neck up, and that’s the last memory I have,” said Ridley.

Zilisch jumped into action, performing CPR until paramedics arrived.

“I haven’t had CPR training in 20 years, and I just went into automatic mode,” said Zilisch.

Dispatchers talked him through it, as Ridley fought for his life.

“I knew it wasn’t his time, and I was like, ‘God, put this life back into this

man,'” said Zilisch.

Ridley was rushed to the hospital, where he woke up after 24 hours.

“Certain things had to happen, for everyone to be around, for me to be living, without a doubt,” said Ridley.

Jeff Zilisch

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff Zilisch

The life-saving actions were recognized by the Mequon Common Council Tuesday evening, Sept. 10 — these neighbors forever connected.

“He saved my life, and I’m blessed with that, but he’s the absolute hero in this scenario,” said Ridley.

Both men stressed the importance of CPR training, saying you’ll never know when you might need to use it.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

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Source: https://fox6now.com/2019/09/10/it-wasnt-his-time-mequon-man-performed-cpr-saving-life-of-neighbor-who-went-into-cardiac-arrest/


Can You Find The Defibrillator At Work? Increase Your Survival Rates

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, according to the American Heart Association. Using an automatic external defibrillator can increase the chance of survival.

Do you know where your workplace’s automated external defibrillator is located? About half of all U.S. employees don’t, according to the results of an American Heart Association survey.

The survey also found that workers in the hospitality and service industry, which includes hotels and restaurants, were less likely to know the location of their workplace’s AED. About 66 percent of them didn’t know where it was. Workers in schools and other education facilities were the most likely to be able to find it: About 61 percent said they knew the AED’s location.

However, the survey didn’t follow up and ask whether the workplace had an AED, and also didn’t try to distinguish between who didn’t know where the AED was and those who didn’t know if there was an AED on site. That makes the findings less clear.

For every minute that you’re in cardiac arrest, you’re pulseless, your [chance of ] survival drops by 10 percent

An AED checks the heart’s rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm.

More than 350,000 cardiac arrests take place in the U.S. in locations other than hospitals each year, according to the American Heart Association. In 2015, Nancy Holland, a resident of Leawood, Kan., became one of them.

She went into cardiac arrest in the restroom of a restaurant where she had been eating dinner with her husband. The restaurant’s manager performed CPR until paramedics arrived with an AED.

Holland says she’s lucky the restaurant’s manager knew CPR, because it kept her “salvageable” until the paramedics showed up. When he started working as a restaurant manager, she says, his mom had told him he owed it to the customers to learn CPR — just in case.

Now whenever she walks into a building, she scans the walls looking for an AED.

“I hope I never need it, but it’s always in the back of my mind,” Holland says.

She also gives talks about the importance of CPR and AED training, emphasizing that cardiac arrest can happen to anyone.

Holland was in her 40s and didn’t have any health problems when she went into cardiac arrest. She had been to her doctor for a checkup just three weeks earlier.

And she’s now a board member of her local chapter of the HeartSafe Foundation, which provides free training in hands-only CPR and works to improve public access to AEDs.

She also says businesses should take precautions before an emergency happens.

About 10,000 cardiac arrests happen in workplaces each year, the AHA says.

More than half of employees — about 55 percent — aren’t offered first aid or CPR/AED training through their employer, the American Heart Association survey found. And sometimes employees have access to only one form of training.

But most of the 2,000 employees surveyed say their employers should offer first aid and CPR/AED training. Ninety percent say they would participate in training if their employers provided them.

Cost and fear of liability are two reasons that businesses don’t install AEDs.

A typical AED costs about $1,200 to $1,500 and prices have gone down over time as the technology becomes more widespread. Machines that once cost $3,000 now run under $1,000, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks the passage of laws related to AEDs.

When it comes to legal liability if an AED is used improperly and someone is injured or killed, in most states you’re protected by law.

In addition, AEDs have a built-in mechanism for analyzing heart rhythms and evaluating whether a shock is needed.

But AEDs do need to be maintained in order to be effective. Batteries should be replaced every two to five years, depending on the model. And the sticky pads that adhere to a cardiac arrest victim’s skin also come with expiration dates and need to be replaced about every two to three years.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t require workplaces to have AEDs, but it does encourage employers to have them on-site.

Click here to learn more about choosing the right AED for your business

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

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Sources: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/06/19/533269211/can-you-find-the-defibrillator-at-work-half-of-people-say-no

 


3 Important Tips for Purchasing an AED (Defibrillator) – Need to Replace?

Thinking of buying an AED? Not sure if you need to replace your existing AED?

If you are thinking about purchasing a new AED, or curious if you’re old AED needs to be replaced, you’re probably scratching your head trying to figure out which AED is best for you. Relax, we wrote this article to take the stress out of buying an AED and provide you with real-world insights to help you make an informed decision to buy the right AED for you.

 

Let’s start off with a little background

Automated External Defibrillators, or AEDs, have been helping both first responders and ordinary individuals safely resuscitate SCA (Sudden Cardiac Arrest) victims and save lives without complex medical training. AEDs work by producing a small electrical charge that can reset a patient’s heart to its correct rhythm.

While easy-to-use portable defibrillators are only a few decades old, AEDs are so effective at saving lives that they’re estimated to increase SCA survival rates by a staggering 70%. Despite these statistics, many areas of the U.S. simply don’t have enough AEDs to go around. Experts estimate that an increase in AEDs to optimal levels could save more than 40,000 American lives each year – and that’s just one reason why it’s essential for more people to learn about and have access to this lifesaving device.

 

What to look for when purchasing an AED

Now we understand the role of an AED let’s take a look at 3 key factors you should take into consideration when purchasing an AED.

 

Cost

Upfront V Lifetime

One of the biggest mistakes we see when purchasing an AED is that buyers are looking at the upfront cost of the unit. However, not all AED’s are created equally. When considering purchasing a new or replacement AED it is important to look at “Lifetime ownership costs“. Typically we see most people own an AED for 10+ years, during that time you will replace batteries and pads several times. However, each manufacturer has a different life of their batteries and pads. So what may appear to be a more cost-effective AED solution upfront, actually turns out to be more expensive over the lifetime of the AED as you may have to replace batteries and pads more frequently in some units.

Quality Compression Feedback

Because you don’t always remember what you learned in class

Another important factor when selecting an AED is quality compression feedback, some AED’s have a very beneficial feature of providing real time feedback for compression depth and rates. Even though you learned CPR in class, having this live feedback during a SCA can be very helpful, after all having a little extra guidance can make the situation a little less stressful.

 

Synchronized Expiration Dates

You don’t want pads to expire while the battery still show’s good

Some AED’s have different life duration between pads and batteries. The problem here is that you will end up replacing pads while the battery is still good.

 

 

 

As many people would expect, the vast majority of AEDs (59%) in the U.S. are currently owned by first responders such as a policemen, firefighters, and EMTs. The next largest group of AED owners are schools (17%), followed by faith-based and recreational organizations, nursing homes and senior centers, and hospitals, clinics, and other medical centers. It’s a good idea to know the general places in which the equipment is most likely to be located, so, in case of emergency, you have a better shot at finding (or helping others to find) a nearby AED. In addition, if you or a loved one has a close family member with a heart condition, you may want to inquire about where the closest AED is, especially if traveling to remote or rural areas.

In the first 10 months after Chicago’s O’Hare Airport installed 49 AEDs on the premises, the devices were used 14 times, saving a total of nine lives – nearly 1 each month (and that’s only one airport). When it comes to helping an SCA victim, every second counts. According to statistics published by the American Heart Association, every additional minute AED use is delayed corresponds with a 10% reduction in patient survival rates. This means that in especially large areas or buildings, such as airports like O’Hare, it pays to have multiple AEDs located in different areas in order to facilitate easy access to the devices.

 

 

So which AED do we purchase?

 

 

Down and Dirty:

HeartSine 350P AED

AED cost is $1,225

Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $352  (batteries and pads)

DOES NOT HAVE Quality compression feedback

DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 4th year.

Total cost of ownership for 10 years – $1,577

 

Best bang for your money & Best Quality:

Zoll AED Plus

AED cost is $1,995

Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $245 (batteries and pads)

DOES HAVE Quality Compression Feedback – says “push harder”

DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 5th year.

Total cost of ownership for 10 years – $2,485

 

Best Value after the Zoll:

HeartSine 450P AED

AED cost is $1,595

Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $352 (batteries and pads)

DOES HAVE Quality Compression Feedback – Says “push faster” “push slower”

DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 4th year.

Total cost of ownership for 10 years is $2,2

 

In our opinion, not that you asked,  The Zoll is a better purchase for $205 more (a little over $20 a year). It’s a more direct command for the rescuer to reduce human error. “Push Harder” is what the Instructor would tell you in class and this AED does that for you for a live rescue situation.  Zoll has a trade in program if you have older AED’s that are still in production. (not discontinued)

While AEDs save an increasing number of lives each year, many Americans don’t even understand what they are. This widespread lack of knowledge means that individuals may not be able to get full use of the life-saving equipment present in their community. Additionally, a lack of understanding means that many Americans are less likely to push for more AEDs in their schools, religious and community centers, and other public areas.

While the number of AEDs is increasing, especially in places like college and university campuses, it’s not increasing fast enough to help many SCA victims. However, increased education and awareness may be able to help. And hopefully, this awareness will help make death from an SCA into an uncommon occurrence.

To learn more about how AEDs (and proper training in their usage) can help save lives in businesses, schools, and other public places, contact UniFirst First Aid + Safety for a free consultation.

Call Now to speak with an AED Specialist

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Emergency burn care and treatment – Stop the Burn

Seconds count, when burns occur. Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

  1. Immediately stop the burning process
  2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient
  3. Provide pain relief
  4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact area
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

Four Critical Steps To Burn Treatment When Burns Occur

Seconds count, when burns occur.

Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

  1. Immediately stop the burning process
  2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient
  3. Provide pain relief
  4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

First Aid Service

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact are
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

 

Click here to shop for burn care products

Do you need First Aid Service for your company? Call 1-800-869-7970 to learn about Onsite First Aid Services for your business or click on the “Live Chat” button on the right side of your screen

 


Four Critical Steps To Burn Treatment Immediately Stop the Burning

Seconds count, when burns occur.

Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third-degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

         1. Immediately stop the burning process

         2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient

         3. Provide pain relief

         4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process. It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact area
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

 

Click here to shop for burn care products

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety Specialist

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

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4 Critical Steps To Take When Treating a Burn Because Seconds Count

Seconds count, when burns occur.

Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

 

  1. Immediately stop the burning process
  2. Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient
  3. Provide pain relief
  4. Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

First Aid Service

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Benefits of burn dressings

  • Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation
  • Acts as a heat exchanger
  • Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact are
  • Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact
  • Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia
  • Stops the burning process
  • Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!
  • Cools the burn, dissipates heat
  • Provides pain relief
  • Easy to use
  • Evaporates slowly
  • Use on any burn
  • Non-adherent, easy to remove
  • Covers and protects against contamination
  • Helps prevent infection
  • Water-soluble
  • Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

  1. https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

 

Click here to shop for burn care products

Do you need First Aid Service for your company?

Call Now

Shop Now

Chat? Click on the “Live Chat” button

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Emergency Burn Care and Treatment Seconds Count

Seconds count, when burns occur. Burns need to be cooled immediately. Otherwise, the heat will continue to destroy the surrounding and underlying tissue, and may even progress into a second or third degree burn. This will present serious complications for the patient both in cost and on-going treatment.

How To Treat A Burn

Here are four critical steps you should take to treat a burn:

1  Immediately stop the burning process

2 Cool the burn, but don’t overcool the patient

3 Provide pain relief

4 Cover and protect the burn area against contamination

It is actually recommended that you don’t use ice. It can cause more damage and slow the healing process.1 It is recommended instead you use a burn dressing. Burn dressings are a gelatinized water mix designed to perform the four critical steps for burn management in one application. Because of their gelatinous nature, they seal the burn from further contamination, they cool the burn site and relieve pain by heat transfer into themselves, and the fluids on the burn site cannot soak into the dressing nor can they evaporate through them. And finally, as the burn site cools down, the dressing warms up, leaving the site covered by a warm dressing, helping to prevent hypothermia.

Burn Dressing will absorb temperatures which is extremely important. The additional gel within the burn gel pouch can be left on the wound for up to four hours prior to receiving further medical treatment if necessary.

Water Gel

Benefits of burn dressings

• Provides controlled cooling by convection, not evaporation

• Acts as a heat exchanger

• Absorbs heat throughout the gel contact are

• Conforms to the burn surface, providing total cooling contact

• Does not affect core body temperature or contribute to hypothermia

• Stops the burning process

• Portable—on the scene—when seconds count!

• Cools the burn, dissipates heat

• Provides pain relief

• Easy to use

• Evaporates slowly

• Use on any burn

• Non-adherent, easy to remove

• Covers and protects against contamination

• Helps prevent infection

• Water-soluble

• Won’t irritate the eyes, nose or mouth

All burns should be treated with concern. It is important to keep in mind the golden rule of burn management: If someone has a burn on his or her body exceeding the size of the palm of his or her own hand, where blisters are present, burns to genitalia, face or to any flexion point, this person should seek medical attention. All electrical burns require medical attention.

1 https://www.healthline.com/health/burns#modal-close

 

Click here to shop for burn care products

Call 1-800-869-7970 to learn about Onsite First Aid Services for your business

 

Click on the “Live Chat” button

 

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OSHA Raises Employer Penalties for 2019

OSHA Raises Employer Penalties for 2019

The penalty increases apply to federal OSHA states.

The penalties levied against employers for safety violations by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have gone up, effective Jan. 24. The increases only apply to citations issued after that date and for the remainder of 2019.

The 2019 penalties are:

·        Other than Serious violations, $13,260 (up from $12,675 in 2018);

·        Serious violations, $13,260 (up from $12,675);

·        Repeat violations: $132,598, (up from $126,749);

·        Willful violations, $132,598 (up from $126,749);

·        Failure to abate (per day), $13,260 (up from $12,675 last year).

The penalty increases apply to federal OSHA states. Nonetheless, OSHA expects that the 26 states operating their own occupational safety and health programs will align penalty structures with federal OSHA so that such programs are equally effective.

“While this is OSHA’s expectation there has been little adjustment from various state plans to align with the increase in penalties,” notes Tressi L. Cordaro, an attorney with the law firm of Jackson Lewis PC. “For example, North Carolina and Kentucky still maintain a $7,000 maximum fine for serious violations and $70,000 for willful or repeats.”

In the future, DOL is required to adjust maximum OSHA penalties for inflation by January 15 of each new year.

Source: https://www.ehstoday.com/standards/osha-raises-employer-penalties-2019

 

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How To Maintain & Clean Your Emergency Eyewash Stations

Eye Wash Station Inspection & Refill Services

Emergency Eyewash Station Maintenance

In this guide, we’ll walk you through some best practices on how to keep your eyewash units in tip-top condition, so that you can rest assured that they’ll be ready for action should the unthinkable happen.

Why is maintenance so important?

Eyewash stations are of critical importance in any workplace that works with hazardous, corrosive substances. Using an eyewash in an emergency situation can help prevent scarring, permanent injury and blindness.

Improper maintenance can lead to a number of hazards, which we’ve detailed below.

Infections

Bacteria, amoeba and other disease-causing organisms thrive in stagnant water. If an eyewash station is not regularly flushed and activated for testing purposes, the water within the system will begin to harbor organisms such as legionella, pseudomonas and acanthamoeba, which, if propelled into the eyes, can cause nasty infections such as conjunctivitis.

If the user’s eyes have been damaged (which, after all, is probably the reason they’d be using an eyewash unit in the first place), the risk of infection is even greater.

Corrosion

Over time, iron-containing metals that come into contact with water are liable to oxidize, or rust. Not only can this lead to contamination of the water used in the eyewash station, but it can also cause damage to the unit itself.

Corrosion can cause holes in the pipes supplying the eyewash unit, resulting in leaks, which can cause the eyewash to discharge water at an insufficient pressure, diminishing its ability to properly flush out the eyes of the user.

image of How To Maintain & Clean Your Emergency Eyewash Stations

Blockages

Occasionally, dust, dirt and foreign objects can build up within an eyewash station, especially if it is not operated for a long period of time. This debris can lead to contamination and cause blockages in the pipework.

Blockages can impede the flow of water to the unit, or conversely increase the pressure, sometimes even to levels that can harm the user’s eyes.

Testing

The ANSI regulations, as well as the various other bodies of guidance that pertain to emergency eyewash stations, state that units must be regularly tested, and for good reason.

Regular testing doesn’t just ensure that the unit is functioning correctly – it also helps prevent the water within the unit from sitting and becoming stagnant and helps flush any collected debris through the pipes.

Aside from the weekly functional testing mandated by the ANSI regulations, it is advisable to perform a weekly visual inspection of all eyewash units to ensure that they are free from detritus and in a good state of cleanliness.

The water stored in portable eyewash stations should be changed at least every 120 days. The water should also be treated with water preservative to help keep microbes at bay. Water preservative comes supplied with all of our portable eyewash units.

Cleaning

As with any item of safety equipment, it is crucial that eyewash stations are kept clean and sanitary. This will prevent the buildup of harmful, infection-causing microbes.

When cleaning an eyewash station, use a simple solution of household detergent and hot water. Apply the solution to the unit with a soft sponge or cloth before rinsing thoroughly, making sure to sluice away any remaining soap residue.

Did You Know?

UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid offers onsite services to help you meet and maintain compliance for your Eye Wash Station, First Aid cabinet, AED, and many other safety-related items?

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety Specialist

Click Here to learn more about Eye Wash Stations

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Source: https://www.safety-eyewash.co.uk/content/eyewash-maintenance-guide