This Labor Day and Every Day: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over

Each year, Americans mark the end of summer with the Labor Day holiday weekend.  Sadly, the Labor Day holiday has also become one of the deadliest, with drunk drivers endangering themselves and others on their way home from holiday festivities.

The Sarasota Police Department is partnering with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to get drunk drivers off the roads and help save lives.  A high-visibility national enforcement campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs from August 15 through September 3, 2018.  During this time, Sarasota Police officers will show zero tolerance for drunk driving.  Increased messages about the dangers of driving impaired, coupled with enforcement and increased officers on the road, aim to drastically reduce drunk driving on our nation’s roadways.

According to NHTSA, 10,497 people were killed in drunk-driving crashes in 2016.  On average, 10,000 people were killed each year from 2012 to 2016—one person killed every 50 minutes in 2016.  This is why the Sarasota Police Department is working with NHTSA to remind drivers that drunk driving is not only illegal, it is a matter of life and death. As you head out to Labor Day festivities, remember: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.

Drunk driving isn’t the only risk on the road: Drug-impaired driving is also an increasing problem on our nation’s roads.  If drivers are impaired by any substance—alcohol or drugs—they should not get behind the wheel of a vehicle.  Driving while impaired is illegal, period.  The bottom line is this: If You Feel Different, You Drive Different. Drive High, Get a DUI. It’s that simple.

Over the 2016 Labor Day holiday period (6 p.m. September 2 – 5:59 a.m. September 6), there were 433 crash fatalities nationwide.  Of the fatal crashes, more than one-third (36%) involved drivers who were drunk (.08+ blood alcohol concentration [BAC]), and one-fourth (25%) involved drivers who were driving with a BAC almost twice the legal limit (.15+ BAC).  Age is a particularly risky factor: Among the drivers between the ages of 18 and 34 who were killed in crashes over the Labor Day holiday period in 2016, 47 percent of those fatalities involved drunk drivers with BACs of .08 or higher.

“We need our community to understand: It’s up to them to make the smart decision to drive sober—Labor Day, and every day,” said Traffic Unit Officer Tim Bales, Sarasota Police Department.  “Drunk driving is a huge problem in our country, and the numbers are rising, little by little.  This isn’t about a ticketing campaign.  This is about a campaign to get the message out that drunk driving is illegal and it takes lives.  Help us put an end to this senseless behavior,” Officer Bales said.  “The trend for the Labor Day holiday is in a positive direction, but our goal is to have zero fatalities, always.”

The Sarasota Police Department and NHTSA are reminding citizens of the many resources available to get them home safely.  There are safe alternatives to drinking and driving:

·      It is never okay to drink and drive.  Even if you’ve had only one alcoholic beverage, designate a sober driver or plan to use public transportation or a ride sharing service to get home safely.

·         Download NHTSA’s SaferRide mobile app, available on Google Play for Android devices: (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nhtsa.SaferRide&hl=en), and Apple’s iTunes Store for iOS devices: (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/saferride/id950774008?mt=8). SaferRide allows users to call a taxi or a predetermined friend, and identifies the user’s location so he or she can be picked up.

·         If you see a drunk driver on the road, call 911 or your local law enforcement agency immediately.

·         Have a friend who is about to drink and drive? Take the keys away and make arrangements to get your friend home safely.

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Americans impacted by hearing loss hits record numbers

May is National Better Hearing Month

UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid and the American Academy of Audiology are encouraging the public to make an appointment with an audiologist if they suspect hearing loss for themselves or any of their loved ones.

According to the National Institutes of Health NIDCD, approximately 20 percent (48 million) of American adults aged 20 to 69, have some trouble with hearing and approximately 28.8 million could benefit from the use of hearing aids. Among adults aged 70 and older with hearing loss who could benefit from hearing aids, fewer than one in three (30 percent) has ever used them.

As the baby boomer population ages, more Americans are forced to face hearing health challenges. Growing numbers of younger Americans (including millennials and GenX’ers) are also reporting hearing problems. The NIH NIDCD also states that five in 10 young people listen to music or other audio too loudly and that four in 10 young people are around “dangerously loud noise during events like concerts and sports games.” Occupational noise is another factor impacting hearing in people of all ages who work outdoors, in factories, fulfillment centers, etc.

Technology has progressed extensively and hearing aids are no longer the bulky contraptions of years past.”  Hearing aid companies have stepped up to the plate to make “very cool” hearing aids for kids and young adults. “You can opt to buy hearing aids that are virtually undetectable or you can buy them in a wide range of cool colors and styles. Many work with smart phones.”

Audiologists are the experts in hearing health, Hearing aids are not always the only or recommended solution, which is why it’s important to see an audiologist to further determine the appropriate treatment. Sometimes the cause is temporary or a symptom of another illness or disease. An audiologist will run various tests to determine the cause and will be able to recommend treatment.

 

Some signs of hearing loss may include:

  • Suddenly having to turn up the volume of the television, radio, or stereo and having other family members complain that the volume is too loud.
  • Difficulty understanding people speaking to you and asking people to repeat themselves.
  • Difficulty with phone conversations and understanding the other person.
  • Sudden inability to hear the doorbell, the dog barking, and other household sounds.
  • People telling you that you speak too loudly.
  • Ringing in the ears.

In furthering working to help the public recognize hearing loss, the American Academy of Audiology helped launch a hearing screening app last year, hearScreen USA. The app provides an easy hearing test through the use of a smart phone. For those who demonstrate hearing loss, the app will recommend an audiologist. Based on technology developed by the University of Pretoria, South Africa, the app provides accurate detection of hearing loss in under three minutes.

To find an audiologist, go to www.audiology.org/FindAnAudiologist.

 

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American Heart Association introduces new mobile app


My Cardiac Coach
Heart attack is scary and confusing. Recovery shouldn’t be.

My Cardiac Coach app available on the Apple App Store or the Google Play is designed to be a personalized recovery toolkit on your smartphone.

• Trustworthy information from the experts at the American Heart Association

• Interactive lessons to help you learn what you need to know

• Progress-trackers for monitoring blood pressure and weight

• Tools for logging physical activity and managing medications

• Connections to other survivors through our Support Network

heart.org

 

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5 Reasons Why Basic First Aid Knowledge Is Important

People often don’t consider the importance of basic first aid education. There are numerous reasons why people put it off.

  • They don’t have the time
  • They don’t know where to begin
  • They don’t believe that accidents will ever happen to them or those close to them
  • They think they already have enough knowledge should the need arise
  1. Helps to save lives.

A trained person is more reliable, confident, and in control of themselves when an emergency arises. People who are trained are more likely to take immediate action in an emergency situation.

  1. It allows the rescuer to provide the victim comfort.

Having someone trained in first aid can bring immediate relief to the patient. Being calm and assessing the situation helps the patient relax while their injuries are being treated and stabilized until emergency personnel arrives.

  1. It gives you tools to prevent the situation from becoming worse.

In some situations, if a patient doesn’t receive basic first aid care immediately their situation will deteriorate – often rapidly. By being able to provide basic care you can stabilize a patient until emergency medical services arrive. You’ll learn how to use basic household items as tools if a first aid kit is not available meaning that you’ll be able to cope with many situations.

You’ll also be trained in how to collect information and data about what happened and the patients’ condition. This information will be passed on to the emergency services, which saves them time – you will be a valuable link in the chain of survival.

  1. It creates the confidence to care.

Having a basic first aid knowledge means that you’ll be confident in your skills and abilities in relation to first aid administration. By taking first aid training, it helps you to reflect on yourself and how you and others react in certain situations. Having this understanding will boost your confidence in a wide range of non-medical day-to-day situations.

  1. It encourages healthy and safe living.

A trained person is better able to assess their surroundings. Knowledge of first aid promotes a sense of safety and well-being amongst people. Having an awareness and desire to be accident-free keeps you safer and reduces the number of causalities and accidents.

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Group CPR Classes & Group First Aid Classes – Is your team CPR ready to save a life?

Group CPR Classes & Group First Aid Classes

 Anyone can learn CPR, is your firm ready to save a life? #cprreadytosavealife

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Now available online (with in-person skills checks)

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Which AED is best? 3 Important Tips for Purchasing an AED (Defibrillator)

individuals safely

Thinking of buying an AED? Not sure if you need to replace your existing AED?

If you are thinking of buying an AED, or curious if you’re old AED needs to be replaced, you’re probably scratching your head trying to figure out which AED is best for you. Relax, we wrote this article to take the stress out of buying an AED and provide you with real world insights to help you make an informed decision to buy the right AED for you.

 

Let’s start off with a little background

Automated External Defibrillators, or AEDs, have been helping both first responders and ordinary individuals safely resuscitate SCA (Sudden Cardiac Arrest) victims and save lives without complex medical training. AEDs work by producing a small electrical charge that can reset a patient’s heart to its correct rhythm.

While easy-to-use portable defibrillators are only a few decades old, AEDs are so effective at saving lives that they’re estimated to increase SCA survival rates by a staggering 70%. Despite these statistics, many areas of the U.S. simply don’t have enough AEDs to go around. Experts estimate that an increase in AEDs to optimal levels could save more than 40,000 American lives each year – and that’s just one reason why it’s essential for more people to learn about and have access to this lifesaving device.

 

What to look for when purchasing an AED

Now we understand the role of an AED let’s take a look at 3 key factors you should take into consideration when thinking of buying an AED.

 

Cost

Upfront V Lifetime

One of the biggest mistakes we see when purchasing an AED is that buyers are looking at the upfront cost of the unit. However, not all AED’s are created equally. When considering purchasing a new or replacement AED it is important to look at “Lifetime ownership costs“. Typically we see most people own an AED for 10+ years, during that time you will replace batteries and pads several times. However, each manufacturer has a different life of their batteries and pads. So what may appear to be a more cost effective AED solution upfront, actually turns out to be more expensive over the lifetime of the AED as you may have to replace batteries and pads more frequently in some units.

Quality Compression Feedback

Because you don’t always remember what you learned in class

Another important factor when selecting an AED is quality compression feedback, some AED’s have a very beneficial feature of providing real time feedback for compression depth and rates. Even though you learned CPR in class, having this live feedback during a SCA can be very helpful, after all having a little extra guidance can make the situation a little less stressful.

 

 

Synchronized Expiration Dates

You don’t want pads to expire while the battery still show’s good

Some AED’s have different life duration between pads and batteries. The problem here is that you will end up replacing pads while the battery is still good.

 

 

 

individuals safely

As many people would expect, the vast majority of AEDs (59%) in the U.S. are currently owned by first responders such as a policemen, firefighters, and EMTs. The next largest group of AED owners are schools (17%), followed by faith-based and recreational organizations, nursing homes and senior centers, and hospitals, clinics, and other medical centers. It’s a good idea to know the general places in which the equipment is most likely to be located, so, in case of emergency, you have a better shot at finding (or helping others to find) a nearby AED. These people are not thinking of buying an AED, they are buying them.  In addition, if you or a loved one has a close family member with a heart condition, you may want to inquire about where the closest AED is, especially if traveling to remote or rural areas.

In the first 10 months after Chicago’s O’Hare Airport installed 49 AEDs on the premises, the devices were used 14 times, saving a total of nine lives – nearly 1 each month (and that’s only one airport). When it comes to helping an SCA victim, every second counts. According to statistics published by the American Heart Association, every additional minute AED use is delayed corresponds with a 10% reduction in patient survival rates. This means that in especially large areas or buildings, such as airports like O’Hare, it pays to have multiple AEDs located in different areas in order to facilitate easy access to the devices.

 

 

So which AED do we purchase?

 

 

Down and Dirty:

  • HeartSine 350P AED
  • AED cost is $1,225
  • Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $352  (batteries and pads)
  • DOES NOT HAVE Quality compression feedback
  • DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 4th year.
  • Total cost of ownership for 10 years – $1,577

 

Best bang for your money & Best Quality:

  • Zoll AED plus Cost is $1,995
  • Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $245 (batteries and pads)
  • DOES HAVE Quality Compression Feedback – says “push harder”
  • DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 5th year.
  • Total cost of ownership for 10 years – $2,485

 

Best Value after the Zoll:

  • HeartSine 450P AED  Cost is $1,595
  • Cost to maintain it over 10 years – $352 (batteries and pads)
  • DOES HAVE Quality Compression Feedback – Says “push faster” “push slower”
  • DOES HAVE synchronized expiration dates – replace supplies every 4th year.
  • Total cost of ownership for 10 years is $2,2

 

In our opinion, not that you asked,  The Zoll is a better purchase for $205 more (a little over $20 a year). It’s a more direct command for the rescuer to reduce human error. “Push Harder” is what the Instructor would tell you in class and this AED does that for you for a live rescue situation.  Zoll has a trade in program if you have older AED’s that are still in production. (not discontinued)

While AEDs save an increasing number of lives each year, many Americans don’t even understand what they are. This widespread lack of knowledge means that individuals may not be able to get full use of the life-saving equipment present in their community. Additionally, a lack of understanding means that many Americans are less likely to push for more AEDs in their schools, religious and community centers, and other public areas.

While the number of AEDs is increasing, especially in places like college and university campuses, it’s not increasing fast enough to help many SCA victims. However, increased education and awareness may be able to help. And hopefully, this awareness will help make death from an SCA into an uncommon occurrence.

To learn more about how AEDs (and proper training in their usage) can help save lives in businesses, schools, and other public places, contact UniFirst First Aid + Safety for a free consultation.

 

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Importance of Gloves in the Workplace

Hand injuries, including injury to fingernails and fingers, are often written off as first-aid usage and near-misses.

Many workers consider the use of gloves hard to comply with and unnecessary. Yet, more varieties of gloves for broader purposes exist than ever before – cut-resistant, chemical protective, electrically-rated, infection control, just to name a few. Carefully identifying the need, then selecting a glove with the appropriate performance parameters can prevent many injuries.

Back in the ‘old days’ People considered it a sign of toughness not to wear gloves. Most never considered wearing gloves to keep a better grip on tools, prevent knuckle busters and burns, or just keep my hands clean. In my teens and twenties, I would have been laughed at for wearing gloves. Now watching shows like Orange County Chopper, Monster Garage, and Pimp My Ride you see these master mechanics wearing gloves.

Gloves can make your job easier and safer. Choosing the correct glove for the job is a critical decision in preventing injuries while maintaining a grip on the situation. Identify the hazard and then evaluate the required characteristics for a glove. Hazards can range from heat, flames, sparks, sharp object electrical energy, and chemicals.

Identify the hazards that could injure hands in this week’s discussion. List the characteristics required in each case and check your inventory to see if you have the proper gloves. Gloves are considered PPE and are the last line of defense in preventing injuries. Wear them every time. Remember that prevention is the key to a workplace where Nobody Gets Hurt.

OSHA 1910.138(a)

General requirements. Employers shall select and require employees to use appropriate hand protection when employees’ hands are exposed to hazards such as those from skin absorption of harmful substances; severe cuts or lacerations; severe abrasions; punctures; chemical burns; thermal burns; and harmful temperature extremes.

OSHA 1910.138(b)

Selection. Employers shall base the selection of the appropriate hand protection on an evaluation of the performance characteristics of the hand protection relative to the task(s) to be performed, conditions present, duration of use, and the hazards and potential hazards identified.

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5 tips to keep your eyes safe!

As reported by NIOSH, 2000 eye injuries occur every day at work in the U.S.

Construction workers have one of the highest eye injury rates.

Most common are particles of dust, metal, wood, slag, drywall, cement, etc. are the most common source of eye injury to carpenters.

Even “minor” eye injuries can cause life-long vision problems and suffering–a simple scratch from sawdust, cement, or drywall can cause corneal erosion that is recurrently painful.

Hammering on metal which gives off metal slivers and the rebounding of the ordinary nail are two of the most common causes of vision loss in construction workers.

1. Understand Potential Eye Hazard Examples

  • Hammering, grinding, sanding, and masonry work that may produce particles
  • Handling chemicals may lead to splashes in the eye
  • Wet or powdered cement in the eye can cause a chemical burn.
  • Welding leads to exposure to arcs and flashes (intense UV radiation) for welders, helpers, and bystanders
  • Dusty or windy conditions can lead to particles in the eye
  • Eye injuries can result from simply passing through an area where work is being performed
  • Coworkers around or above you may generate the hazard

2. Find the Z87 marking on your safety glasses.

 

Safety eye and face protection includes non-prescription and prescription safety glasses, clear or tinted goggles, faceshields, welding helmets, and some full-face type respirators that meet the ANSI Z87.1 Eye and Face Protection Standard

The safety eyewear must have “Z87” or “Z87+” marked on the frame and in some cases the lens

Goggles are stronger than safety glasses

Goggles are used for higher impact protection, greater particle protection, chemical splashes, and welding light protection

Goggles for splash or high dust protection should have indirect venting

Goggles with direct venting (a mesh of small holes around the sides) tend to fog less, but should not be used with liquid or fine dust hazards

Common tasks: sawing, chipping, grinding, masonry work, using a nail gun, pouring cement, and working with chemicals

When goggles are used for welding make sure they are the proper shade # (the shade number is marked on the lens and shows how dark the lens is)

3. When should you use a face shield?

Faceshields are used for even higher impact protection and to protect the wearer’s face in addition to the eyes

Faceshields should always be used over safety glasses or goggles

Particles or chemicals can easily go around a faceshield and the curve of the faceshield can direct them into the eye

Faceshields are frequently lifted leaving the eyes unprotected without the safety glasses or goggles

Common tasks: spraying, chipping, grinding

4. If safety glasses look, cool people are more likely to wear them.

Safety glasses have hard or soft nose pieces, padded temples, and a variety of other features that improve comfort without adding great cost

Safety glasses come in many styles from the Buddy Holly heavy frames to the old visitor specs, frameless lens, frames with football logos, aviator metal frames, and the most stylish wraparound glasses

Tinted safety glasses are now common that rival the most expensive commercial sunglasses but cost much less and are safer

What are the lenses made of in your safety glasses?

Most non-prescription ( Plano ) safety glasses have polycarbonate lenses

The non-prescription safety glasses are tested by shooting a 1/4″ BB at 100mph at the lens and dropping a 1 lb pointed weight from 4′ on the lens–if it breaks in either test it won’t have the Z87 mark

Prescription safety glasses may have polycarbonate, glass, or plastic called CR39 but these glasses only have to pass a test of dropping a 2oz steel ball from 4′ unless they are marked Z87+; then they must pass the high velocity/impact tests

Polycarbonate lenses are much more impact resistant than glass or plastic lenses. Glass and plastic lenses usually shatter into small sharp pieces, but polycarbonate usually just cracks

Are your safety glasses scratched?

Polycarbonate lenses scratch easier than other lenses, but new anti-scratch coatings help if the glasses are cared for properly

Wear an eyewear retainer strap that will let the glasses hang around your neck when not in use instead of laying them down on the job

Store them in an old sock before they are tossed into a tool chest or the seat of a car or pickup

Use a glasses cleaning station or wash and wipe with a soft clean cloth (old T-shirts work fine, but the sweaty shirt that you’re wearing may have as much drywall dust as your safety glasses, creating a muddy mess on the lenses by day’s end)

When do you take your safety glasses off?

When finished with a tool or specific task–but what’s going on around you?

At your break–but are there still hazards around you from other workers?

At the end of the day, but while still on the job site–a carpenter took his glasses and tool belt off and left them on the roof at the end of the day; while climbing down the ladder he lost an eye from a coworker dropping pliers on him from above

As you leave the site and are out of the hazard zone

5. What do you do to stop your safety glasses from fogging?

Buy safety glasses that have anti-fog coatings put on during manufacturing

Use anti-fog solutions on the lenses regularly, if needed

Wear a sweatband on your forehead or a cool rag in your hard hat

Keep the lenses clean and unscratched.

If you need help deciding, contact UniFirst First Aid + Safety today!

 

 

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What Keeps a Safety Leader Up at Night?

The 2018 National Safety Survey reveals how safety leaders are using data to overcome safety challenges.

While 80% of survey respondents indicated that top management supports safety efforts, many respondents believe executives don’t fully understand the value of keeping workers safe. Here are the challenges they said arise when it comes to executives understanding safety culture:

 

“For EHS professionals, the lack of emotional intelligence (EQ) skills and the disconnect of EHS value integrating/supporting business goals.”

“Adequate training [is needed]. Too many companies pile employees into a room full of computers, where they fly through safety training. The supervisor just sits and reads the paper.”

“Too much influence is wielded by people who only care about next quarter’s numbers. Employees are an expendable supply.”

“Our corporate culture assumes one-size-fits-all when it comes to worker safety and facility safety requirements. Different facilities are at different places in their safety journey so you can apply the same logic to all.”

“I work for a large global corporation. The biggest frustration is the development of ‘global’ standards by people who do not have interaction with the plants and try to do the one-size-fits-all approach. They don’t look at the sites and allow them to do what makes sense for the specific situation at the individual sites.”

 

Data could be the key to proving how effective a robust safety program could be to a company’s culture and bottom line. EHS professionals increasingly are using technology to identify and reduce workplace hazards through recording and using data, according to survey results. About 58% of respondents said they are using software to track, manage, analyze and report data about their facility’s safety performance.

Despite having to prove the value of safety to top management, survey respondents indicate overall satisfaction with their roles, with 85% saying they were either ‘very satisfied’ or ‘satisfied’ with their choice. Here is what survey takers had to say about their careers:

Small companies need to understand there is more to safety than just having a safety professional on board. It takes an honest commitment from executives to be positively involved in company safety and to involve safety in everything from the bidding process to project completion. Safety shouldn’t start at the signing of the contract.

Source: https://www.ehstoday.com/safety-leadership/what-keeps-safety-leader-night

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‘Couldn’t let him go:’ Washington County woman saved stepfather’s life with CPR

A Washington County woman jumped into action to save her stepfather’s life. The 26-year-old performed CPR until first responders arrived to help.

 

“I mean, it was crazy,” said Rachel Nelson. “You sort of have to block the chaos out and focus on the job at hand.”

Nelson and her stepfather, Curt Vorpahl, were hanging out with family on Friday, July 19.

“We thought it was going to be a great day to be out on the lake,” said Vorpahl.

Rachel Nelson, Curt Vorpahl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The family was gathered when Vorpahl suddenly went into cardiac arrest.

“The last thing I remember was thinking how warm it was for it starting to become the evening,” said Vorpahl. Vorpahl’s pulse faded away, and Nelson quickly reacted.

“I started immediately with compressions, followed by rescue breaths. I continued that for five minutes or so,” said Nelson. It involved five minutes of intense focus.

“I was thinking of my family the whole time, how I couldn’t let him go. I didn’t want to let my family down,” said Nelson.

A first responder was nearby, providing a pocket mask and AED.

“He was shocked by the AED,” said Nelson. Vorpahl made it to the hospital.

“I still don’t believe it,” Vorpahl said. “It’s like it never happened.”

Hearing how many people fought for his life brought Vorpahl immense gratitude and emotion. “Every second count’s in a situation like this,” said Nelson.

Nelson learned CPR as a teenage lifeguard. Over the years, she renewed her certification and urged everyone to get theirs. The family was working with neighbors to hopefully put together a CPR course so more people can learn the life-saving skill.

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Source: https://fox6now.com/2019/07/24/couldnt-let-him-go-washington-county-woman-saved-stepfathers-life-with-cpr/