Understanding the different types of hard hats

Har hats are designed to protect one of the most important parts of the human body. But did you know that there are different types and classes of hard hats. Make sure that you are using the right class of hard hat for the job.

The American National Standards Institute ANSI has put together a list to help ensure you have the right protection for the job.

ANSI Types of Hard Hats

According to ANSI Z89.1 all hard hats can be divided into two types. Type I and Type II.

  • Type I: Have a full brim around the entire hat. These are only mean to to protect workers from object blows that come from above and strike the top of the helmet.
  • Type II Have a short brim only in front. These hard hats are designed to offer protection from lateral blows and objects. This includes front and back, and side as well as top. These hard hats are also test for off-center penetration resistance and chin strap retention. Type II are the most commonly found hard hat in use.

ANSI Classes of Hard Hats

Hard Hats are also divided into classes to indicate how well they protect against shock.

  • Class E (Electrical) Can withstand up to 20,000 volts of electricity
  • Class G (General) Can withstand up to 2,200 colts of electricity
  • Class C (Conductive) These offer no protection from electric shock

Materials & Suspension

Most hard hats are made of non-conductive, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and come equipped with a suspension that can be adjusted for a custom fit. Suspensions are available with 4, 6, or 8 load-bearing points and can be fitted using several different types of adjustments. The most common are pinlock, where the hard hat is removed and a pin is matched to a corresponding hole, and ratchet, which uses a knob to tighten or loosen the suspension’s fit around the head while wearing the hard hat.

Styles

When considering tasks and situations, hard hats are available in different styles. Cap hard hats have a short front brim that helps to shade the face from the sun and keeps rain away from the eyes. Some cap hard hats can also be worn backwards so the front brim is over the back of the neck. Full brim styles feature a brim that goes around the entire cap and shades the face, back of the neck, and ears. The full brim can also help to channel rain and snow away from the face and head.


Teen’s quick acting saves life with CPR

Nineteen year old Hannah Evans was at home getting ready to leave for work. When she looked outside and saw family friend Becky Garverick, who had been helping Hannah’s parents cut their lawn. Suddenly Hannah saw Becky collapse to the ground.

Hannah rushed out to the yard and checked for a pulse and immediately began chest compressions. She called 911 and continued with chest compressions.

“At one point while doing CPR, I lost Becky’s pulse. But I just kept going,” she explained.

Hannah is a nursing student at NC State in Mansfield. She learned CPR while attending Pioneer Career and Technology Center as a medical technology student.

Hannah had never performed CPR on an actual person until that day, and if she hadn’t been trained to do so, Becky Garverick knows she would not be here today.

Source: Galion Inquirer


Electric Hand Dryers vs. Paper Towels: There’s a Clear Winner

 

Using paper towels to dry your hands is far more hygienic than using electric hand dryers. Using hand dryers actually increases the amount of bacteria on hands and can spread cross contamination in public washrooms, according to an independent scientific study. The study, conducted by scientists at the University of Westminster, London, measured the number of bacteria on subjects’ hands before washing and after drying them using three different methods —paper towels, a traditional warm air dyer and a new high-speed jet air dryer.

From a hygiene standpoint, paper towels are clearly superior to electric hand dryers, according to Keith Redway, a Senior Academic in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Westminster.

Study results show that drying with paper towels results in a significant decrease in the numbers of bacteria on the hands — a clear advantage compared with the increases observed for both types of electric hand dryers tested in this study — and are far less likely to contaminate other washroom users and the washroom environment.

“Indeed, these findings suggest that if either a warm air dryer or jet air dryer is the only drying method available, in terms of bacterial numbers, a washroom user could be better off not washing and drying their hands at all,” Redway says.

The Study found that paper towel drying reduced the average number of bacteria on the finger pads by up to 76 percent and on the palms by up to 77 percent. By comparison, electric hand dryers actually caused bacteria counts to increase. The study showed:

• Traditional warm air dryers increased the average number of bacteria by 194 percent on the finger pads and by 254 percent on the palms.

• Jet air dryers increased the average number of bacteria on the finger pads by 42 percent and on the palms by 15 percent.

The scientists also carried out tests to establish whether there was the potential for cross contamination of other washroom users and the washroom environment as a result of each type of drying method. They found:

• The jet air dryer, which blows air out of the unit at claimed speeds of 400 mph, was capable of blowing micro-organisms from the hands and the unit and potentially contaminating other washroom users and the washroom environment up to 2 meters away.

• Use of a traditional warm air hand dryer spread micro-organisms up to 0.25 meters from the dryer.

• Paper towels showed no significant spread of micro-organisms.

“The results of all parts of this study suggest that the use of warm air dryers and jet air dryers should be carefully considered in locations where hygiene is of paramount importance, such as hospitals, clinics, schools, nurseries, care homes, kitchens and other food preparation areas,” said Redway. “In addition, paper hand towel use is highly beneficial for improved hygiene in any other facilities open to the public, such as factories, offices, bars and restaurants.”

While consumers, healthcare institutions and businesses such as restaurants are often told that electric hand dryers are the most hygienic way to dry the hands after washing them, science says otherwise. A growing body of research, including this study by the University of Westminster and other studies as far back as 1989, suggest people could even be putting themselves at increased risk of illness by using electric hand dryers.

Content UniFirst First Aid + Safety today for help with your restroom supply needs.


Is your soap clean?

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.

Refillable Bulk Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat

Refillable bulk soap is messy and labor intensive, and has been proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

Contact your UniFirst First Aid + Safety representative today for a free consultation.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.

Man saves wife’s life with CPR

APPLETON, WI (WBAY/CNN) – Andrea Benrud is alive and well thanks to her husband, Luke, and his knowledge of CPR.

Luke Benrud took a CPR class so he knew to call 9-1-1 and then started CPR until EMS arrived.

“I just remembered chest compressions are most important and you would have to do them harder than you would think you’d have to do them. Especially when it’s your wife, you don’t want to hurt her,” Benrud explained.

“Seeing somebody else giving her CPR and then somebody else hooking her up to the defibrillator, shocking her, that’s when it all starts to hit me, the gravity of the situation,” he recalled.

The Joplin Globe


Hockey goalie makes a different kind of save

Oliver Urrego sprang into action March 1 when an opposing player collapsed on the ice during an adult league hockey game at Twin Rinks Ice Pavilion in Buffalo Grove.

While the goaltender on Napholz’s team, Mike Tuntland, started CPR, Urrego, 33, took charge of the life-or-death situation. He told other players to get the automated external defibrillator (AED), which the rink installed years ago.

Urrego gave Napholz chest compressions, then used the AED to revive him. It was the first time he used an AED.

This was the second time in a year the Oliver Urrego used CPR to save a life. In 2017 he and his wife performed CPR on his father-in-law who went into cardiac arrest in the couples home.

Source: Daily Herald


Avoid Occupational Back Injuries

Safety First

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According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), more than one million workers experience back injuries each year. One fourth of all workers compensation indemnity claims are a result of back injuries. Low back pain is one of the most common reason that people miss work, second only to the common cold. In America, we spend more than $100 billion annually in medical bills, disability and lost productivity at work from back injuries and illnesses. More importantly, this problem causes unnecessary discomfort and pain to workers which can have a devastating effect on their lifestyle and ability to work. A BLS survey shows that 75% of back injuries occurred while performing lifting tasks, which underscores the importance of reducing back injuries caused by lifting.

Work Smart

Always warm – Up your back and legs before performing any lifting task! We are ALL athletes in life, so we need to warm-up our body to improve performance and to reduce risk of injury. It’s important to prepare your body for work.

Low Back Rotation Stretch – Stand with hands on hips. Stabilizing the hips and legs, gently roll your upper body forward, right, backward, and left to stretch your lower back. Perform 5 slow circles gradually expanding the circle each time. Repeat in the opposite direction.

Hamstring & Achilles Stretch – Position your body with one leg forward and the toes of that foot raised up. Keep your back straight while you bend forward at the waist. You should feel a stretch in the back of your thigh and knee. Then shift your weight onto your forward leg and bend knee, keep the back leg straight and heel on floor. Hold each stretch for 20 seconds. Perform each stretch 2 times for each leg.

Before You Lift

  • Know what you are lifting and how you will lift it.
  • Be aware of the weight of the object.
  • Determine whether or not it’s safe to lift on your own.
  • Make sure the work area is flat, dry and clear of debris. CHECK YOUR PATHWAY
  • Make sure the lift pathway is clear .
  • Remove any tripping hazards or debris.
  • Check for any wet or slick surfaces.

USE ERGONOMIC EQUIPMENT

  • Use lift assists, forklift, dolly, cart, hand truck or hoist .
  • Make sure you are trained before using the equipment.

GET HELP WHEN NEEDED

  • When lifting awkward or heavy loads, utilize a two person lift .
  • Make sure you lift at the same time and keep the load level. WEAR PROPER PPE
  • Wear proper required protective shoes and gloves.

Contact UniFirst First Aid + Safety today to help you with you safety and PPE needs.


Wife saves her firefighter husbands life with CPR

Luke and Jessica Pichette (Photo courtesy of KHQ)
Luke and Jessica Pichette (Photo courtesy of KHQ)

Jessica Pichette and her husband Luke were getting ready for bed when the unthinkable happened.

Jessica did chest Jessica says her husband began making strange sounds, she thought he was having a stroke. “I started dialing 911 at that time, kind of rolled him of over and at that time he a big deep breathe and then he was gone, he was not breathing, his eyes were rolled back,” Pichette said.

Jessica did chest compressions for six minutes until sheriff’s deputies, firefighters and EMS arrived and took him to the hospital.

Jessica hopes that more people will learn the crucial skill of CPR.

Source: KHQ


AED’s can be found everywhere, do you know how to use one?

 Americans die everyday from Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)

Of SCA victims die before reaching hospital

 Brain death starts to occur without CPR and Defibrillation

 

None of us expect to have a Sudden Cardiac Arrest, SCA can happen anytime and anywhere. Did you know you can double the chance of survival with effective bystander CPR & Defibrillation provided immediately after Cardiac Arrest?

Does your workplace have a compliant AED?

Is your team CPR Certified?

 

Be ready to save the life of a family member, friend, co worker or a complete stranger.

Click here to learn about AED’s or call 1-800-869-6970


Who says music doesn’t save lives?

In an effort to help train first responders in hands-only CPR, New York Presbyterian Hospital has released a 40-song playlist whose beats per minute match the number of chest compressions.

Most people are familiar with The Bee Gees’ 1977 hit – and aptly named – Stayin’ Alive which took the number one spot.

Artists from Beyoncé to Justin Timberlake to ABBA also had songs on the set list.

Scroll down to listen to the playlist

Bee Gees
Bee Gees

On a 40-track playlist released by New York Presbyterian Hospital, Stayin’ Alive by the Bee Gees came out as the best song to perform CPR to

TOP 10 SONGS FOR SAVING LIVES

  1. Stayin’ Alive – Bee Gees
  2. Cecilia – Simon and Garfunkel
  3. Hard to Handle – The Black Crowes
  4. Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  5. Rock Your Body – Justin Timberlake
  6. I Will Survive – Gloria Gaynor
  7. MMMBop – Hanson
  8. Gives You Hell – The All-American Rejects
  9. Heartbreaker – Mariah Carey ft Jay Z
  10. Another One Bites the Dust – Queen

Stayin’ Alive, the disco hit made popular by the movie Saturday Night Fever, has a rhythm of 103 beats per minute.

This is close to the recommended rate of at least 100 chest compressions per 60 seconds that should be delivered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Additionally, doctors say, the song is well known enough to be useful in teaching the general public to effectively perform the lifesaving maneuver.

The 40-song list, which has a duration rate of two hours and 28 minutes of CPR jams, also includes songs like ABBA’s Dancing Queen and Beyoncé’s Crazy in Love.

Pop fans can enjoy tracks from Missy Elliot and Justin Timberlake, while alt-rock aficionados can choose from Fall Out Boy or the All-American Rejects.

Despite the number of times CPR ‘saves’ someone’s life on TV, it has an abysmal success rate in real life.

Only about eight percent of CPR patients are saved by the procedure, even when backup help is called immediately.

Those who’ve had to be saved with CPR are likely to experience other painful injuries, as well, such as crushed or ruptured organs.

However, performing CPR more than doubles the survival rate of patients who go into cardiac arrest.