Risks of performing CPR – What you need to know.

The American Heart Association consistently supports and promotes CPR classes for people not in the medical profession—so when someone has a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital or medical facility, there will be a higher chance of a bystander stepping in to perform lifesaving CPR while the victim waits for emergency response teams to arrive.

Studies show that brain death begins within four to six minutes after a cardiac arrest, and those who do not get CPR within that time are extremely likely not to survive. Getting CPR immediately—and if you’re not in a hospital, that usually means from a bystander—could mean the difference between life and death.

First, whether or not you can be sued will vary depending on where you are and who you are. The 2000 Federal Cardiac Arrest Survival Act grants those who administer CPR or use an AED immunity from civil charges, except in instances of willful misconduct or gross negligence.

Good Samaritan laws exist on a state-by-state basis. Mostly, they provide at least some protection for those who perform CPR or use an AED. Some states actually require you to step in if you know CPR or, in some cases, if you are a medical professional. In Vermont, for instance, requires bystanders to give “reasonable assistance” or face a $100 fine.

Generally, however, Good Samaritan Laws are there to protect bystanders who perform CPR. Mostly, you are required to ask permission before performing CPR if a person is not already in your care. If they cannot reply, then consent is implied.

You will not be protected by Good Samaritan laws if you try to go outside your area of training—if you try to perform an impromptu tracheotomy to save a choking victim, for example, and you are not a trained surgeon. If your behavior has been judged to be reckless or negligent, or if you leave the victim after initially providing care, you could also be sued.

If someone has a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order that specifies lifesaving care must not be provided in case of a sudden cardiac arrest or another health crisis, you must do as it says and avoid giving CPR—if you know about it. If you didn’t know about it, you generally can’t be prosecuted for giving lifesaving CPR anyway. But what about first aid? Medical professionals and lay-rescuers often ask if they can be sued for first aid? Generally, the answer is the same, you can’t be prosecuted for giving first aid to someone in need and you are not required to do so if you feel uncomfortable about it. Be sure to practice good faith and common sense if you ever end up in a situation where someone might need CPR or first aid.

Medical professionals who give CPR to people with a DNR order can potentially be in trouble—if they know about the DNR. The issue of giving CPR to someone with a DNR is complicated, however. In some states, DNR orders are only valid inside a hospital setting; outside the hospital, they do not apply. This means that an emergency response team can legally give someone CPR even if they have a DNR order. In other states, however, emergency medical responders are allowed to abide by DNR orders when responding to emergency calls in the victim’s home.

In addition, in some states, patients who move from one healthcare facility to another are required to tell their medical teams about the DNR.  Usually, medical professionals are not required to abide by a DNR order they do not know about.

The truth is that you can be sued for anything, at any time. The question is not whether you can be sued for performing CPR; the question is whether you can be successfully sued. The answer in most cases is no; Good Samaritan laws in most states protect bystanders from legal consequences if they act prudently and in keeping with their training. Hopefully, widely publicized cases of people being refused CPR will not keep non-medical citizens from getting certified for CPR—and providing lifesaving care if it is required.

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OSHA – An Amazing Resource You Might Not Know About….

OSHA Can Help In a Surprising Way…

OSHA’s offers on-site consultation program and the best part? it’s FREE and confidential for small & medium-sized businesses operating across the U.S.

A great benefit that OSHA offers to small, medium or newly established businesses is a FREE safety consultation service. OSHA on-site consultation services are provided to companies who request the service, with priority given to high-hazard worksites. This free program is available to small & medium businesses operating in the United States.

Don’t worry, OSHA is here to help with this valuable program. These on-site consultation services are not part of the OSHA enforcement department and you will not get penalties or citations, even if things at your company aren’t quite perfect. If applicable, companies may even qualify for a one-year exemption from routine OSHA inspections by utilizing the free service. Your obligation is to make a commitment and follow through with correction serious workplace safety and health hazards.

OSHA consultants are from state agencies and universities and they work with employers to help identify workplace hazards. The consultants will also provide advice on OSHA compliance standards and can also assist the company to set up health and safety programs that fit the business.

On-Site Consultants Will:

  • Help you recognize hazards in your workplace.

  • Suggest general approaches or options for solving a safety or health problem.

  • Identify kinds of help available if you need further assistance.

  • Provide you a written report summarizing findings.

  • Assist you to develop or maintain an effective safety and health programs.

  • Provide training and education for you and your employees.

The On-Site Consultants Will Not:

  • Issue citations or propose penalties for violations of OSHA standards.

  • Report possible violations to OSHA enforcement staff.

  • Guarantee that your workplace will “pass” an OSHA inspection.

Theis program is entirely voluntary, OSHA will not approach you about participating. Any employer who wants to benefit from this free service must request it.

Visit OSHA’s Consultation Directory at osha.gov to learn more.

 

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Lifting Right? Here are some quick tips to prevent back injury

Safety First

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), more than one million workers experience back injuries each year. One-fourth of all worker’s compensation indemnity claims are a result of back injuries. Low back pain is one of the most common reasons that people miss work, second only to the common cold. In America, we spend more than $100 billion annually on medical bills, disability, and lost productivity at work from back injuries and illnesses. More importantly, this problem causes unnecessary discomfort and pain to workers which can have a devastating effect on their lifestyle and ability to work. A BLS survey shows that 75% of back injuries occurred while performing lifting tasks, which underscores the importance of reducing back injuries caused by lifting.

#1 – Work Smart

Always warm – Up your back and legs before performing any lifting task! We are ALL athletes in life, so we need to warm up our bodies to improve performance and to reduce the risk of injury. It’s important to prepare your body for work.

Low Back Rotation Stretch – Stand with hands-on-hips. Stabilizing the hips and legs, gently roll your upper body forward, right, backward, and left to stretch your lower back. Perform 5 slow circles gradually expanding the circle each time. Repeat in the opposite direction.

Hamstring & Achilles Stretch – Position your body with one leg forward and the toes of that foot raised up. Keep your back straight while you bend forward at the waist. You should feel a stretch in the back of your thigh and knee. Then shift your weight onto your forward leg and bend your knee, keeping the back leg straight and heel on the floor. Hold each stretch for 20 seconds. Perform each stretch 2 times for each leg.

#2 – Before You Lift

  • Know what you are lifting and how you will lift it.
  • Be aware of the weight of the object.
  • Determine whether or not it’s safe to lift on your own.
  • Make sure the work area is flat, dry and clear of debris. CHECK YOUR PATHWAY
  • Make sure the lift pathway is clear .
  • Remove any tripping hazards or debris.
  • Check for any wet or slick surfaces.

 

 

 

 

#3 – USE ERGONOMIC EQUIPMENT

  • Use lift assists, forklift, dolly, cart, hand truck, or hoist .
  • Make sure you are trained before using the equipment.

#4 – GET HELP WHEN NEEDED

  • When lifting awkward or heavy loads, utilize a two-person lift.
  • Make sure you lift at the same time and keep the load level. WEAR PROPER PPE
  • Wear proper required protective shoes and gloves.

Contact UniFirst First Aid + Safety today to help you with your safety and PPE needs.

 

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The 10 second race – A simple explanation for eye wash station compliance

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that each day about 2,000 U.S. workers have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. Chemical burns to one or both eyes are common.

Many of these injuries can result in blindness. Proper safety equipment, such as eye protection and eyewash stations can save a worker’s eyesight.

OSHA on Compliance

The General Requirements in section 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.151 states “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

American National Standards Institute

(ANSI) Standard Z358.1-2014 sets universal minimum performance and use requirements for all eyewash stations and drench shower equipment.

ANSI standard Z358.1-2014 says an eyewash station must:

  • Be accessible within a 10-second walk from the hazard
  • Be accessible without the need to walk up or down stairs, ladders, or cross any obstacles or roadways etc.
  • Deliver a 15-minute continuous flow of tepid fluid at 0.4 gallons per minute and be 60-100°F
  • Be located in areas where caustic or hazardous substances are present
  • Activate in one second or less and with one single motion
  • Be unobstructed
  • Be highly visible and identified with a sign

Where to place your emergency eyewash station

According to ANSI standards, the following areas must meet emergency eyewash compliance guidelines:

  • Painting and solvent operations
  • Battery charging stations
  • Tool parts washers
  • Laboratories
  • Hazardous chemical storage
  • Chemical pumping and/or mixing areas
  • Anywhere you use a chemical that has SDS eyewash requirements

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How do you say thank you to someone who saved your life?

When Rod Glasper, 62, woke up in St. David’s Round Rock Medical Center, he didn’t know why he was there. His sister, Inger Glasper, told him a nurse had saved his life after his heart stopped beating while he was shopping at an H-E-B grocery store.

On Friday, Glasper met the nurse who performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on him, 64-year-old Lily DeVarona, for the first time in person at a news conference outside the hospital.

How do you say thank you to someone who saved your life?” asked Glasper, who lives in Austin.

“This lady gave me more time with my family, gave me more time with my friends. … I’m blessed that somebody would stop and put her hands on me during this time of COVID. I’ve had all three COVID shots, but you can’t tell because it’s not written on my forehead.”

Inger Gasper, right, thanks registered nurse Lily DeVarona for saving the life of her bother, Rod Glasper, left, at St. David’s Round Rock Medical Center on Friday.

Glasper collapsed when a potentially fatal arrhythmia caused his heart to stop, said DeVarona. An arrhythmia is an irregular heartbeat.

DeVarona, who works in the recovery room at St. David’s Surgical Hospital in Austin, said Friday that she was getting some last-minute snacks for a University of Texas football game at an H-E-B on RM620 in Round Rock when she saw Glasper lying in an aisle.

 

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Source: https://www.statesman.com/story/news/2021/10/25/heb-nurse-cpr-grocery-grocery-store-shopper/6107020001/


First Aid Service – DIY versus Outsource

Have you ever utilized a first aid service before? Do you know that such a service exists?

Oftentimes businesses attempt to handle the first aid and safety needs for their company by themselves. Perhaps this is possible when a company is small and has only a few employees. However, through the challenges of a company growing and becoming more viable in its industry, first aid and safety needs could begin to take a backseat, leaving them vulnerable.

Having a first aid service company manage your first aid and safety needs can be very beneficial.

  1. Allow’s you to focus on your business, its growth, and more complex issues that come with that.

  2. Ensure that you have an adequate supply of products to meet or exceed the latest A.N.S.I or O.S.H.A standards, and help you understand and comply with those standards.

  3. Having this service could also have a positive impact on employee morale and increased productivity.

In this article, we are going to go over the recommended fill list for an industrial first aid cabinet.

The areas of first aid that your business first aid cabinet should cover as A.N.S.I defines them are:

  1. Minor wounds
    • Bandages
    • Antiseptics
  2. Major wounds
    • Compresses
    • Gauze
    • Tape
  3. Burns
    • Burn gels
    • Sprays
    • Ointments
    • ice packs
  4. Eye injuries
    • Eyewash
    • Eyecups
  5. Personal comfort
    • Analgesics
    • Ibuprofen
    • Non-aspirin
    • Aspirin

Putting together a first-aid program yourself that meets the above areas can be a real challenge. It could be difficult to source all of these items, especially in single-unit dose packaging that helps to mitigate cross-contamination. Most items sold and purchased through pharmacies or large box stores are meant for personal or home first aid kits.

A service company like UniFirst First Aid + Safety will meet with you and your team to design a program based on your needs and environment. Knowing that your first aid and safety needs are being handled by professionals from UniFirst First Aid + Safety, will allow you to put your mind at rest and focus on other areas of your business.

 

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OSHA requires annual fire extinguisher training – Are You Compliant?

October is Fire Safety Month

In accordance with OSHA reg 1910.157 annual training is required for employees who may use fire extinguishers at the workplace.

UniFirst First Aid + Safety provides unique fire safety training using a state-of-the-art eco-friendly system. No mess, no cleanup, and train in multiple locations at your facility.

SAVE UP TO 35% off regular price

** Can be booked as a stand-alone class or with other training. Available to new fire safety training customers only. Special pricing valid through November 30, 2021.

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You Are the Help Until Help Arrives

Learn Five Simple Steps That May Save a Life

  1. Call 9-1-1

  2. Stay Safe

  3. Stop the Bleeding

  4. Position the Injure

  5. Provide Comfort

Life-threatening emergencies can happen fast and emergency responders aren’t always nearby.
You may be able to save a life by taking simple actions immediately.
You Are the Help Until Help Arrives.

Click on the links below to learn more about how you can help:

Why get involved when someone is badly injured?

According to a recent National Academies of Science study, trauma is the leading cause of death for Americans under age 46. Life-threatening injuries require immediate action to prevent an injured person from dying. Those nearest to someone with life-threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.


Take the You Are the Help Until Help Arrives web-based training below:

Download in-person training materials. Follow this link to visit the instructor page and download the course content so that you can teach others.

 

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Source: Ready.gov 


National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls in Construction

Warf Event - OSHA/Clark Construction

National Safety Stand-Down

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 370 of the 991 construction fatalities recorded in 2016 (BLS data). Those deaths were preventable. The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries.


A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on “Fall Hazards” and reinforcing the importance of “Fall Prevention”. Employers of companies not exposed to fall hazards, can also use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals. It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall and other job hazards they see.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone who wants to prevent hazards in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down. In past years, participants included commercial construction companies of all sizes, residential construction contractors, sub- and independent contractors, highway construction companies, general industry employers, the U.S. Military, other government participants, unions, employer’s trade associations, institutes, employee interest organizations, and safety equipment manufacturers.

Partners

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down and FAQ’s

Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity such as conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace anytime May 7-11, 2018. See Suggestions to Prepare for a Successful “Stand-Down” and Highlights from the Past Stand-Downs. OSHA also hosts an Events page with events that are free and open to the public to help employers and employees find events in your area.

Certificate of Participation

Employers will be able to provide feedback about their Stand-Down and download a Certificate of Participation following the Stand-Down.

Share Your Story With Us

If you want to share information with OSHA on your Safety Stand-Down, Fall Prevention Programs or suggestions on how we can improve future initiatives like this, please send your email to oshastanddown@dol.gov. Also share your Stand-Down story on social media, with the hashtag: #StandDown4Safety.

If you plan to host a free event that is open to the public, see OSHA’s Events page to submit the event details and to contact your Regional Stand-Down Coordinator.

Credit: https://www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/

OSHA reminds employers COVID-19 is a recordable illness

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration reminds us that any incidents of employees contracting the novel coronavirus at work are recordable illnesses, subject to the same rules and failure-to-record fines as other workplace injuries and illnesses.

While OSHA specifically exempts employers from recording incidents of employees contracting common colds and the flu in the workplace, COVID-19 is not exempt, the agency noted on a newly added website providing OSHA guidance for preventing occupational exposure to the rapidly spreading virus.

 

 

The guidance, while not a standard or regulation, outlines safety standards that employers whose workers are at high risk of contracting COVID-19 should implement to remain in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act’s general duty clause.

The report also advises employers to develop an infectious disease preparedness and response plan, implement basic infection prevention measures, and develop policies for the identification and isolation of ill individuals.

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Source: https://www.businessinsurance.com/article/20200311/NEWS06/912333495/OSHA-reminds-employers-COVID-19-is-a-recordable-illness-coronavirus