One New Years resolution you must make – Get CPR/First Aid training

CPR/First Aid – 2021 Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Our CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

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Hands-only CPR proves easier, saves more lives

CPR saves lives. That’s a given.

And in 2016, after the American Heart Association came out with a new way of doing CPR, even more lives are being saved.

According to the statistics, 1,000 Americans have a heart attack every day.

“The most important period when someone goes into cardiac arrest is the first 3 to 4 minutes,” said Dan Schaefer, Operations Chief for Metro Area Ambulance. This is why CPR, administered during those critical minutes, can make a difference in saving a life. But times have changed.

The old-fashioned CPR process using a mouth-to-mouth technique has become a thing of the past.  Schaefer says it was just too difficult for a lot of people to do and many were reluctant to do it.

“Obviously nobody likes to think about, especially these days, about other people’s germs and we all know, that was a factor on whether or not bystanders would do CPR,” Schaefer explained.

So, in 2016, hands-only CPR emerged.

“Research and obviously the science of it all came back and said, ‘You know, chest compression alone for the first three minutes is actually better,’” he said.

Now, bystanders are asked to only do chest compressions, 100 per minute. Science shows there’s still enough oxygen in the blood and the compressions get it where it needs to go. Schaefer says the idea is this process will help until medical help arrives after three minutes or so. Hands-only CPR is easier — bystanders are more willing to do it, and the proof is in lives saved. “It’s been a big move and we’re seeing it in the numbers,” said Schaefer. “We got to watch survival rates from 6 percent move up into the 50 percent rate.”

That, he says, is impressive. But Schaefer still stresses the importance of public education and training — good compressions for a good outcome in cardiac arrest, he notes.

 

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Source: https://www.kxnet.com/news/local-news/hands-only-cpr-proves-easier-saves-more-lives/


5 Reasons Why Basic First Aid Knowledge Is Important

People often don’t consider the importance of basic first aid education.

There are numerous reasons why people put it off.

  • They don’t have the time
  • They don’t know where to begin
  • They don’t believe that accidents will ever happen to them or those close to them
  • They think they already have enough knowledge should the need arise
  1. Helps to save lives.

A trained person is more reliable, confident, and in control of themselves when an emergency arises. People who are trained are more likely to take immediate action in an emergency situation.

  1. It allows the rescuer to provide the victim comfort.

Having someone trained in first aid can bring immediate relief to the patient. Being calm and assessing the situation helps the patient relax while their injuries are being treated and stabilized until emergency personnel arrives.

  1. It gives you tools to prevent the situation from becoming worse.

In some situations, if a patient doesn’t receive basic first aid care immediately their situation will deteriorate – often rapidly. By being able to provide basic care you can stabilize a patient until emergency medical services arrive. You’ll learn how to use basic household items as tools if a first aid kit is not available meaning that you’ll be able to cope with many situations.

You’ll also be trained in how to collect information and data about what happened and the patients’ condition. This information will be passed on to the emergency services, which saves them time – you will be a valuable link in the chain of survival.

  1. It creates confidence to care.

Having basic first aid knowledge means that you’ll be confident in your skills and abilities in relation to first aid administration. By taking first aid training, it helps you to reflect on yourself and how you and others react in certain situations. Having this understanding will boost your confidence in a wide range of non-medical day to day situations.

  1. It encourages healthy and safe living.

A trained person is better able to assess their surroundings. Knowledge of first aid promotes a sense of safety and well being amongst people. Having an awareness and desire to be accident-free keeps you safer and reduces the number of causalities and accidents.

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Less than 20% of Americans are equipped to perform CPR, lets change that…

Anyone can learn CPR, are your employees trained to save a life? 

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, Our CPRAED and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

CPR classes are a great team-building opportunity!

 

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#cprreadytosavealife #cprteambuilding

 

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A quick tip for fire extinguisher use

Thanksgiving is the #1 day for home kitchen fires in the US

Are you prepared? Do you have a fire extinguisher? More importantly, do you know how to use it?

A quick helpful tip for fire extinguisher use.

Remember the acronym PASS

Pull the pin
Aim low, at the base of the fire
Squeeze the handle slowly
Sweep nozzle from side to side

 

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CPR/First Aid Training – Now available online

Anyone can learn CPR, is your team ready to save a life?

UniFirst First Aid + Safety/UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, our CPRAED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees on how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

 

Can we take the course online?

Absolutely! You can now take your class online, this allows for more flexibility for your schedule and also provides an alternative option to reduce in-person class time. After students pass the online portion we will come to your location to conduct “Skills Checks” which takes typically less than an hour for up to 10 students, we follow the CDC and AHA COVID-19 guidelines and will adhere to any specific requirements you may have beyond the CDC and AHA guidelines.

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety/UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR Specialist

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Florida deputy reunited with 5-year-old girl she saved 3 years ago

A Florida sheriff’s deputy was recently reunited with a child she saved and shared a post on Facebook about the emotional experience.

Corporal Sherry Rego described it as the best day of her entire year.

“She was crying happy tears a minute ago when we called and asked permission to share this beautiful post from her personal Facebook page,” the Collier County Sheriff’s Department wrote.

The corporal wrote that while she was pumping gas, she was approached by a little girl.

“While pumping gas this beautiful girl came to my truck… tears rolled in my eyes as I looked at her, her parents and big brother… Her mom said to her do you remember your angel, why did she say this? Because just over 3 years ago I was giving her lifeless daughter CPR. She was almost 2 and today she proudly shared she is 5 and on her way to Disney!”

The corporal said the experience was a reminder of why she is a first responder.

“This was such a blessed reminder why I do the job I do, and beyond grateful to the amazing agency I work for that believes in top notch training for their deputies and equipment to do our everyday tasks. Enjoy your Disney weekend pretty girl, you left my heart so full today.”

 

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Source: https://www.fox46.com/news/florida-deputy-shares-emotional-post-with-5-year-old-girl-she-saved/


Fire Training In The Workplace – What You Need To Know

Fires destroy property, cause injuries, and take lives

One of the key strategies for maintaining a safe workplace and preventing fires is fire safety training.

With proper training, workers can eliminate fire hazards and respond quickly and efficiently if a fire breaks out. Without proper training, a small occurrence can quickly grow to become a major incident with devastating outcomes.

Everyone is at risk if there is a fire. However, there are some workers who may be at greater risk because of when or where they work, or because they’re not familiar with the premises or the equipment at the worksite.

Fire safety training can teach workers how to recognize fire hazards, conduct a fire safety risk assessment, prevent a workplace fire, and respond if a fire occurs.

 

 

Recognizing Fire Hazards

Fire safety training begins by identifying the basic properties of fire. All fires start when heat (a source of ignition) comes into contact with fuel (anything that burns) and oxygen is present. To prevent a fire the goal is to keep sources of ignition and fuel apart.

 

 

Conducting a Fire Safety Risk Assessment

The fire safety risk assessment helps identify what a workplace needs to do to prevent a fire and keep people safe. The assessment looks at:

1. Emergency routes and exits
2. Fire detection and warning systems
3. Fire fighting equipment
4. Removal or safe storage of dangerous substances
5. The emergency fire evacuation plan
6. The needs of vulnerable people
7. Communication with employees and others on the premises
8. Staff fire safety training

A fire safety risk assessment is the first step in identifying fire hazards. It also identifies the people at risk, state of emergency preparedness, and effectiveness of controls in the workplace. With the information from the risk assessment employers can make improvements in their fire safety plans and eliminate or reduce risks. Employers can also ensure appropriate training is provided to workers.

 

 

Preventing Workplace Fires

Fire safety training teaches workers how to prevent fires. If workers are aware of the best ways to prevent fires, they can contribute significantly to a safer workplace.

 

Tips to prevent fires in the workplace include:

1. Keep the workplace clean. Common litter and construction debris act as fuel for fire. Clutter may block access to exits and emergency equipment.
2. Smoke only in designated areas and extinguish smoking materials safely. Never smoke in storerooms or chemical storage areas.
3. Mark hazards and potential fire risks with clear, visible signage. Post emergency telephone numbers and the company address by the telephone in all work areas.
4. Keep machinery cleaned and properly lubricated to prevent overheating and friction sparks.
5. Place oily rags in a covered metal container. This waste must be properly disposed of on a regular basis.
6. Have faulty wiring and malfunctioning electrical equipment repaired promptly. Never attempt electrical repairs unless you are qualified and authorized.
7. Avoid running electrical cords or wires under rugs and carpets or near a heat source; keep them out of doorways where they can become worn.
8. Maintain open access to all electrical control panels. Material or equipment stored in front of the panels could delay power shutdowns in emergency situations.
9. Use and store chemicals safely. Read the labels and the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) to learn about flammability and other fire hazards. Provide adequate ventilation when using and storing these substances.
10. Be aware of possible ignition sources when working in potentially explosive atmospheres, such as those containing flammable liquid vapors or fine particles (e.g. vehicle paint spraying or grain flour). Use non-sparking tools and control static electricity as required.
11. Never block sprinklers, firefighting equipment, or emergency exits. Observe clearances when stacking materials.
12. Learn how to properly use a fire extinguisher. Know where fire extinguishers are located and which extinguishers to use for the specific type of fire.

 

How to Respond if a Fire Starts

It’s important that everyone in the workplace is prepared for a fire. Workers need to know what to do in case a fire occurs and how to work together to effectively stop the advance of a fire.

Through fire safety training, workers learn:

The company’s emergency plan
The worker’s role in the emergency plan
How to activate the fire alarm so the building occupants can escape
To leave the area immediately, closing all doors behind them
Where designated muster areas are located outside the building
What to do if they encounter heat or smoke upon exiting
How to fight a small fire with a portable extinguisher

Workers and employers need to take fire drills seriously and learn from them to improve response. By practicing what to do in a fire, flaws in the emergency plan can be revealed and those faults can then be addressed. Practice also builds confidence and helps keep everyone calm in the event of a real fire.

 

 

The Use of Extinguishers

Most workplaces contain portable fire extinguishers. Fire extinguishers can only put out small, contained fires, such as a fire in a wastebasket. Extinguishers in different workplaces may or may not be suitable for dealing with grease or electrical fires.

Workers that haven’t received training in the proper use of portable extinguishers should not attempt to fight a fire.
Through training workers learn to never fight a fire:

if the fire is large or spreading
if their escape route may be blocked by the spread of fire
if they are not trained in the correct use of the extinguisher or are unsure of the type of fire

If workers do fight a fire they should:

call 9-1-1 first
ensure everyone has evacuated or is leaving the area or building

 

Conclusion

Everyone is responsible for preventing fires in the workplace – employers and employees alike.
In addition to possible injury and loss of life, a serious fire can close down a workplace resulting in significant job losses. It is possible to reduce the threat of fire to people and property by teaching everyone to work together to prevent fires with comprehensive fire safety training.

 

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Source:http://www.healthsafety.com/articles/why-fire-safety-training-important


Protect your Hearing Month – 3 Tips to Protect your Hearing

Did you know you can permanently lose your hearing from prolonged exposure to noise!

 

12 million Americans have hearing loss as a result of exposure to noise, noise-induced hearing loss.

October is National Protect your Hearing Month. We encourage Americans to protect their hearing by:

  1. Wearing hearing protection when around sounds louder than 85dB for 30 minutes or more.
  2. Turning down the volume when listening to the radio, the TV, MP3 player, or anything through earbuds and headphones.
  3. Walking away from loud noise.

Noise-induced hearing loss is caused by damage to the microscopic hair cells, or cilia, which are found in the inner ear. Cilia are small sensory cells that convert the sounds we hear (sound energy) into electrical signals that travel to the brain. Once damaged, our hair cells cannot be repaired or grow back, causing permanent hearing loss.

The loudness of sound is measured in units called decibels (dB). Noise-induced hearing loss is caused by prolonged exposure to any loud noise over 85 (dB), such as concerts, sporting events, lawnmowers, fireworks, MP3 players at full volume, and more. Brief exposure to a very intense sound, such as a gunshot near the ear, can also damage your hearing.

An environment is too loud and considered dangerous if you:

  1. Have to shout over background noise to be heard.
  2. It is painful to your ears.
  3. It makes your ears ring during and after exposure.

If you have decreased or “muffled” hearing for several hours after exposure, that is a sign of temporary and possibly permanent hearing damage.

Howard Leight MAX 30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hearing loss not only affects your ability to understand speech but it also has a negative impact on your social and emotional well-being. Noise-induced hearing loss can occur gradually over time, and people don’t often realize they are changing the way they live to make up for the disability.

 

Howard Leight Thunder Muff 29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you suspect you may have hearing loss, make an appointment to see an audiologist. He or she will perform a hearing test to determine the type and severity of hearing loss you may have.

UniFirst First Aid + Safety Hearing Protection

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Fire Safety Month: Plan, Prevent, Train & Recover

Fire safety is taught and practiced from the earliest days of kindergarten—we all remember “Stop, Drop, and Roll”—but preparedness training should never end. Workplace fires pose a risk across all industries, making fire safety training and policies an essential part of keeping employees, customers, and the surrounding community safe.

According to OSHA,workplace fires and explosions kill 200 and injure more than 5,000 workers each year, costing businesses more than $2.3 billion in property damage. Explosions and fires account for 3 percent of workplace injuries and have the highest casualty rate of all probable workplace accidents. Many unexpected explosions and fires are due to faulty gas lines, poor pipefitting, improperly stored combustible materials, or open flames.

Taking preventative steps, implementing training, and drilling simulation exercises can lower risk and prepare employees in case a fire ever does break out in the workplace.

 

Preventative Steps
According to Safety Services Company,2 only 15 percent of fires are a result of circumstances outside of human control. Most workplace fires can be prevented, and there are preventative steps every organization can take to mitigate the risk.

Begin by performing a workplace hazard assessment. Walk through the building or work environment, document any fire hazards, and make sure there is full accessibility to things such as electrical control panels, emergency exits, firefighting equipment, and sprinklers. Test smoke alarms and check fire extinguishers for expiration dates.

Because electricity accounts for 39 percent of workplace fires, keep a close eye out for any electrical hazards, such as faulty wiring and malfunctioning electrical equipment. Make sure electrical cords are in good condition and power outlets are not overloaded. Replace anything that appears overheated, smells strange or has frayed or exposed wires.

 

Hazard Communication

If your organization uses chemicals or other hazardous materials, read labels to ensure you are storing and disposing of them properly in appropriate containers with adequate ventilation. Fire hazards such as oily rags should be discarded in a covered metal container and emptied on a regular basis. Chemicals should be handled with proper protective equipment and separated from flammable materials.

Walking through your building and pinpointing possible fire hazards allows you to fix issues before they become problems. Once hazards are identified, taking action to quickly fix them and address safety processes will go a long way toward reducing the likelihood of a fire.

 

Disaster Plan Development 
Fires are unexpected and unpredictable. While prevention can lower risk, accidents do still happen. In order to prepare for the worst, organizations must develop an effective disaster response plan to minimize fire damage and prepare employees. Every business is different and must customize its response plan to fit the facility and its employees, but there are common elements that all plans should include.

A disaster response plan is developed to guide organizations through a crisis event, such as a fire, and helps them resume operations afterwards. The plan should include an annual review of your organization’s overall fire safety procedures and best practices for addressing any hazards found.

Planning also should focus on the evacuation process and method for reporting fires. Make sure emergency exits are clearly labeled and accessible; posting emergency exit routes throughout the building will help people calmly navigate an anxious situation. Likewise, educating employees on the plan will keep them well informed and prepared to evacuate if necessary. Designating a meeting area allows volunteer team leaders to take roll call, confirm everyone is accounted for, and report any missing employees to first responders. The plan also should contain personal information about your employees, including phone numbers and next of kin contacts.

Finally, the disaster response plan should be easily accessible and understood by all levels of staff. It is a living document that requires frequent review and regular updates, so ongoing training is critical. Developing a flexible plan that is easy for employees to understand helps keep everyone safe, ultimately improving the resilience of everyone within the organization.

 

Train to Improve Resiliency
Assembling a disaster response team comprised of multiple departments from the organization guarantees the entire business is involved in the process of plan development and training. The response team should designate roles and responsibilities to all personnel. Make sure each employee knows his or her roles and responsibilities and understands the different aspects of the response plan.

Take time to discuss the specific hazards within your organization, such as flammable materials, toxic chemicals, radioactive sources, or water-reactive substances, as well as the protective actions employees can take should they come in contact with said hazards. Be sure employees know who their team leaders are and clearly communicate who is in charge during an emergency to minimize confusion. Include updated response plan procedures in orientation programs to keep all employees on the same page and prepare them to remain calm during an emergency.

Depending on the size of your organization, you may want to take the time to train employees on how to use a fire extinguisher or execute first aid procedures. Once everyone is properly trained, knows their responsibilities and understands the disaster response plan, hold a practice drill involving the entire organization. After each drill, gather the teams and evaluate the effectiveness of the drill and specify any areas that need improvement. Hold regular practice drills to continuously improve the evacuation process and fix any holes in the plan. As a result, the resiliency of the whole organization will be improved.

After a fire, a business still needs to maintain operations even though the physical location may be compromised. The disaster response plan should detail actions that need to be taken after the fire to enable the company to continue maintaining critical operations. Begin by detailing the organization’s functions, services, and who is being served to determine the kind of temporary space the business will need to occupy during the recovery process. If equipment is needed to carry out job functions, have a plan to access the equipment and make arrangements to set up an alternative workspace. Setting up remote access so employees can work from home is another viable option for certain industries.

 

Seeking Third-Party Services
Disaster planning, training, and recovery management can be a draining process for organizational leaders. Seeking help from a third-party service provider can alleviate the stress and take the burden off your company. A third-party service provider can help design a disaster response plan to fit your organizational needs and structure training sessions that prepare the entire workforce for crises. Engaging outside expertise also helps to identify things your organization may have missed and guides the development of drills that will make fire safety second nature for employees.

In addition to keeping your organization resilient, your employees may need help recovering, too. Surviving a fire can be a traumatic event that leaves a lasting impact. Employers should provide the option of an employee assistance program, or EAP, to help staff adjust back to their daily routines after a life-changing event. EAP services provide access to counseling, management consultation, and local resources to ensure employees are supported after a fire or other crisis.

Organizations across all industries must be prepared for the threat of fire. Preventative steps, designing the right disaster response plan, and implementing regular training sessions and drills will help mitigate the risk of a fire and keep your employees safe.

 

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Source: https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2019/05/01/Fire-Safety-Plan-Prevent-Train-Recover.aspx?admgarea=ht.FireSafety&Page=1