First Aid Service – DIY versus Outsource

Have you ever utilized a first aid service before? Do you know that such a service exists?

Oftentimes businesses attempt to handle the first aid and safety needs for their company by themselves. Perhaps this is possible when a company is small and has only a few employees. However, through the challenges of a company growing and becoming more viable in its industry, first aid and safety needs could begin to take a backseat, leaving them vulnerable.

Having a first aid service company manage your first aid and safety needs can be very beneficial.

  1. Allow’s you to focus on your business, its growth, and more complex issues that come with that.

  2. Ensure that you have an adequate supply of products to meet or exceed the latest A.N.S.I or O.S.H.A standards, and help you understand and comply with those standards.

  3. Having this service could also have a positive impact on employee morale and increased productivity.

In this article, we are going to go over the recommended fill list for an industrial first aid cabinet.

The areas of first aid that your business first aid cabinet should cover as A.N.S.I defines them are:

  1. Minor wounds
    • Bandages
    • Antiseptics
  2. Major wounds
    • Compresses
    • Gauze
    • Tape
  3. Burns
    • Burn gels
    • Sprays
    • Ointments
    • ice packs
  4. Eye injuries
    • Eyewash
    • Eyecups
  5. Personal comfort
    • Analgesics
    • Ibuprofen
    • Non-aspirin
    • Aspirin

Putting together a first-aid program yourself that meets the above areas can be a real challenge. It could be difficult to source all of these items, especially in single-unit dose packaging that helps to mitigate cross-contamination. Most items sold and purchased through pharmacies or large box stores are meant for personal or home first aid kits.

A service company like UniFirst First Aid + Safety will meet with you and your team to design a program based on your needs and environment. Knowing that your first aid and safety needs are being handled by professionals from UniFirst First Aid + Safety, will allow you to put your mind at rest and focus on other areas of your business.

 

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OSHA requires annual fire extinguisher training – Are You Compliant?

October is Fire Safety Month

In accordance with OSHA reg 1910.157 annual training is required for employees who may use fire extinguishers at the workplace.

UniFirst First Aid + Safety provides unique fire safety training using a state-of-the-art eco-friendly system. No mess, no cleanup, and train in multiple locations at your facility.

SAVE UP TO 35% off regular price

** Can be booked as a stand-alone class or with other training. Available to new fire safety training customers only. Special pricing valid through November 30, 2021.

Call Now to schedule your fire safety training

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You Are the Help Until Help Arrives

Learn Five Simple Steps That May Save a Life

  1. Call 9-1-1

  2. Stay Safe

  3. Stop the Bleeding

  4. Position the Injure

  5. Provide Comfort

Life-threatening emergencies can happen fast and emergency responders aren’t always nearby.
You may be able to save a life by taking simple actions immediately.
You Are the Help Until Help Arrives.

Click on the links below to learn more about how you can help:

Why get involved when someone is badly injured?

According to a recent National Academies of Science study, trauma is the leading cause of death for Americans under age 46. Life-threatening injuries require immediate action to prevent an injured person from dying. Those nearest to someone with life-threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.


Take the You Are the Help Until Help Arrives web-based training below:

Download in-person training materials. Follow this link to visit the instructor page and download the course content so that you can teach others.

 

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Source: Ready.gov 


National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls in Construction

Warf Event - OSHA/Clark Construction

National Safety Stand-Down

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 370 of the 991 construction fatalities recorded in 2016 (BLS data). Those deaths were preventable. The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries.


A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on “Fall Hazards” and reinforcing the importance of “Fall Prevention”. Employers of companies not exposed to fall hazards, can also use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals. It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall and other job hazards they see.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone who wants to prevent hazards in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down. In past years, participants included commercial construction companies of all sizes, residential construction contractors, sub- and independent contractors, highway construction companies, general industry employers, the U.S. Military, other government participants, unions, employer’s trade associations, institutes, employee interest organizations, and safety equipment manufacturers.

Partners

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down and FAQ’s

Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity such as conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace anytime May 7-11, 2018. See Suggestions to Prepare for a Successful “Stand-Down” and Highlights from the Past Stand-Downs. OSHA also hosts an Events page with events that are free and open to the public to help employers and employees find events in your area.

Certificate of Participation

Employers will be able to provide feedback about their Stand-Down and download a Certificate of Participation following the Stand-Down.

Share Your Story With Us

If you want to share information with OSHA on your Safety Stand-Down, Fall Prevention Programs or suggestions on how we can improve future initiatives like this, please send your email to oshastanddown@dol.gov. Also share your Stand-Down story on social media, with the hashtag: #StandDown4Safety.

If you plan to host a free event that is open to the public, see OSHA’s Events page to submit the event details and to contact your Regional Stand-Down Coordinator.

Credit: https://www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/

OSHA reminds employers COVID-19 is a recordable illness

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration reminds us that any incidents of employees contracting the novel coronavirus at work are recordable illnesses, subject to the same rules and failure-to-record fines as other workplace injuries and illnesses.

While OSHA specifically exempts employers from recording incidents of employees contracting common colds and the flu in the workplace, COVID-19 is not exempt, the agency noted on a newly added website providing OSHA guidance for preventing occupational exposure to the rapidly spreading virus.

 

 

The guidance, while not a standard or regulation, outlines safety standards that employers whose workers are at high risk of contracting COVID-19 should implement to remain in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act’s general duty clause.

The report also advises employers to develop an infectious disease preparedness and response plan, implement basic infection prevention measures, and develop policies for the identification and isolation of ill individuals.

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Source: https://www.businessinsurance.com/article/20200311/NEWS06/912333495/OSHA-reminds-employers-COVID-19-is-a-recordable-illness-coronavirus

 


Understanding eyewash stations and their requirements

 

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that each day about 2,000 U.S. workers have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. Chemical burns to one or both eyes are common.

Many of these injuries can result in blindness. Proper safety equipment, such as eye protection and eyewash stations can save a worker’s eyesight.

OSHA on Compliance

The General Requirements in section 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.151 states “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

American National Standards Institute

(ANSI) Standard Z358.1-2014 sets universal minimum performance and use requirements for all eyewash stations and drench shower equipment.

ANSI standard Z358.1-2014 says an eyewash station must:

  • Be accessible within a 10-second walk from the hazard
  • Be accessible without the need to walk up or down stairs, ladders, or cross any obstacles or roadways etc.
  • Deliver a 15-minute continuous flow of tepid fluid at 0.4 gallons per minute and be 60-100°F
  • Be located in areas where caustic or hazardous substances are present
  • Activate in one second or less and with one single motion
  • Be unobstructed
  • Be highly visible and identified with a sign

Where to place your emergency eyewash station

According to ANSI standards, the following areas must meet emergency eyewash compliance guidelines:

  • Painting and solvent operations
  • Battery charging stations
  • Tool parts washers
  • Laboratories
  • Hazardous chemical storage
  • Chemical pumping and/or mixing areas
  • Anywhere you use a chemical that has SDS eyewash requirements

For more information contact UniFirst First Aid + Safety today for a free consultation.

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CPR Training Saves Baby

Clarintje Kopra, a St. Maarten Academy high school graduate and one of the volunteers of Red Cross St. Maarten, used her CPR training on March 23 to save the life of a four-month-old baby girl when she did not wake up from her nap. Despite the emotions, Kopra, a teaching assistant in a day-care centre, remained focused and confident during the emergency situation.

With her mother always encouraging her to remain a volunteer, she remembered what she had been taught, administered CPR and had the baby breathing again by the time the ambulance arrived.

The first-aid-certified volunteer said after the incident that she felt great because she had saved a life. Red Cross St. Maarten said this week on its social media page that it is proud of Kopra and encourages her to keep up the amazing work.

Source: The Daily Herald

Click Here to learn about CPR and CPR Certification

Click Here to learn about AED’s and Defibrillators

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Fall Prevention In The Construction Industry

Construction Fall Protection

National Safety Stand-Down

Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees, accounting for 370 of the 991 construction fatalities recorded in 2016 (BLS data). Those deaths were preventable. The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness across the country in an effort to stop fall fatalities and injuries.


A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on “Fall Hazards” and reinforcing the importance of “Fall Prevention”. Employers of companies not exposed to fall hazards, can also use this opportunity to have a conversation with employees about the other job hazards they face, protective methods, and the company’s safety policies and goals. It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall and other job hazards they see.

Who Can Participate?

Anyone who wants to prevent hazards in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down. In past years, participants included commercial construction companies of all sizes, residential construction contractors, sub- and independent contractors, highway construction companies, general industry employers, the U.S. Military, other government participants, unions, employer’s trade associations, institutes, employee interest organizations, and safety equipment manufacturers.

Partners

OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down and FAQ’s

Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity such as conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace anytime May 7-11, 2018. See Suggestions to Prepare for a Successful “Stand-Down” and Highlights from the Past Stand-Downs. OSHA also hosts an Events page with events that are free and open to the public to help employers and employees find events in your area.

Certificate of Participation

Employers will be able to provide feedback about their Stand-Down and download a Certificate of Participation following the Stand-Down.

Share Your Story With Us

If you want to share information with OSHA on your Safety Stand-Down, Fall Prevention Programs or suggestions on how we can improve future initiatives like this, please send your email to oshastanddown@dol.gov. Also share your Stand-Down story on social media, with the hashtag: #StandDown4Safety.

If you plan to host a free event that is open to the public, see OSHA’s Events page to submit the event details and to contact your Regional Stand-Down Coordinator.

Credit: https://www.osha.gov/StopFallsStandDown/

It’s Time to Thank Members of the Nation’s Most-Trusted Profession

It’s Time to Thank Members of the Nation’s Most-Trusted Profession, Nurses.

 

For the past 16 years, the Gallup poll has named nurses as the most-trusted profession in its ratings of honesty and ethical standards in professions.

The poll showed 82% of Americans describe nurses’ ethics as high or very high. By comparison, 60% rated members of Congress as low or very low for honesty and ethical standards.

 

Some restaurants across the country are showing nurses a little love by offering freebies and discounts for National Nurses Week this week.

The week goes through May 12, which was the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.

Nurse appreciation deals

Participation can vary. To be on the safe side, check with your closest restaurants.

CinnabonThrough May 12, nurses get one free Cinnabon Classic Roll, MiniBon Roll or a four-count BonBites when they show their badge at participating locations.

Culver’sThere’s not a nationwide promotion and individual locations may offer specials throughout the week for nurses with a valid ID. One way to check is by calling your closest location and some may post specials on the location’s details page at www.culvers.com.

Jimboy’s Tacos: Nurses who show a valid employee ID get a buy-one-get-one free deal on the California-based chain’s Original Ground Beef Tacos through Saturday. Limit three free tacos per nurse at participating locations.

Pollo TropicalThrough Saturday, nurses get 25% off any purchase when they show their healthcare ID and use code 651 at checkout, according to a Facebook post.

Potbelly Sandwich ShopThrough Saturday, show your medical ID or wear your scrubs for a free fountain drink or cookie with the purchase of a sandwich or salad. Limited to one per customer.

More deals: Individual franchises of national chains including Chick-fil-A might also have freebies and specials for nurses. Locally-owned businesses also will honor nurses and one of the easiest ways to find out is to check restaurants’ social media channels.

Credit; Kelly Tyco – USAToday.com


Back to School Driving Safety Tips

School days bring congestion:  School buses are picking up their charges, kids on bikes are hurrying to get to school before the bell rings,  parents trying to drop their kids off before work.

Slow down and pay attention than when kids are present – especially before and after school.

If You’re Dropping Off

Schools often have very specific drop-off procedures for the school year. Make sure you know them for the safety of all kids. More children are hit by cars near schools than at any other location, according to the National Safe Routes to School program. The following apply to all school zones:

  • Don’t double park; it blocks visibility for other children and vehicles
  • Don’t load or unload children across the street from the school
  • Carpool to reduce the number of vehicles at the school

Sharing the Road with Young Pedestrians

According to research by the National Safety Council, most of the children who lose their lives in bus-related incidents are 4 to 7 years old, and they’re walking. They are hit by the bus, or by a motorist illegally passing a stopped bus. A few precautions go a long way toward keeping children safe:

  • Don’t block the crosswalk when stopped at a red light or waiting to make a turn, forcing pedestrians to go around you; this could put them in the path of moving traffic
  • In a school zone when flashers are blinking, stop and yield to pedestrians crossing the crosswalk or intersection
  • Always stop for a school patrol officer or crossing guard holding up a stop sign
  • Take extra care to look out for children in school zones, near playgrounds and parks, and in all residential areas
  • Don’t honk or rev your engine to scare a pedestrian, even if you have the right of way
  • Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians
  • Always use extreme caution to avoid striking pedestrians wherever they may be, no matter who has the right of way

Sharing the Road with School Buses

If you’re driving behind a bus, allow a greater following distance than if you were driving behind a car. It will give you more time to stop once the yellow lights start flashing. It is illegal in all 50 states to pass a school bus that is stopped to load or unload children.

  • Never pass a bus from behind – or from either direction if you’re on an undivided road – if it is stopped to load or unload children
  • If the yellow or red lights are flashing and the stop arm is extended, traffic must stop
  • The area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous for children; stop far enough back to allow them space to safely enter and exit the bus
  • Be alert; children often are unpredictable, and they tend to ignore hazards and take risks

Sharing the Road with Bicyclists

On most roads, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as vehicles, but bikes can be hard to see. Children riding bikes create special problems for drivers because usually they are not able to properly determine traffic conditions. The most common cause of collision is a driver turning left in front of a bicyclist.

  • When passing a bicyclist, proceed in the same direction slowly, and leave 3 feet between your car and the cyclist
  • When turning left and a bicyclist is approaching in the opposite direction, wait for the rider to pass
  • If you’re turning right and a bicyclists is approaching from behind on the right, let the rider go through the intersection first, and always use your turn signals
  • Watch for bike riders turning in front of you without looking or signaling; children especially have a tendency to do this
  • Be extra vigilant in school zones and residential neighborhoods
  • Watch for bikes coming from driveways or behind parked cars
  • Check side mirrors before opening your door

By exercising a little extra care and caution, drivers and pedestrians can co-exist safely in school zones.

Source: NSC

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