Distracted Driving Awareness Month

April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Each day in the United States approximately 9 people are killed and more than 1,000 injured in crashes that are reported to involve a distracted driver.1

Motor vehicle fatalities are up 6% from 2015, with more than 40,000 people killed in 2017.

Types of Distractions

  • Cell Phones
  • Dashboard infotainment systems
  • Struggling with voice assistants

Then the more serious

  • Drunk driving
  • Drowsy driving
  • Drugged driving

All of these distractions pose a threat to our safety.

Taking your eyes off the road for just one second can change a life forever.

Click Here to learn more about staying safe on the road

 

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Teen’s quick acting saves life with CPR

Nineteen year old Hannah Evans was at home getting ready to leave for work. When she looked outside and saw family friend Becky Garverick, who had been helping Hannah’s parents cut their lawn. Suddenly Hannah saw Becky collapse to the ground.

Hannah rushed out to the yard and checked for a pulse and immediately began chest compressions. She called 911 and continued with chest compressions.

“At one point while doing CPR, I lost Becky’s pulse. But I just kept going,” she explained.

Hannah is a nursing student at NC State in Mansfield. She learned CPR while attending Pioneer Career and Technology Center as a medical technology student.

Hannah had never performed CPR on an actual person until that day, and if she hadn’t been trained to do so, Becky Garverick knows she would not be here today.

Source: Galion Inquirer


Runner’s life saved by CPR

Shortly after finishing his race, Andy Martin collapsed due to a heart attack.

Ryan Sanders who is an athletic trainer and a Furman University police officer, preformed CPR and used an AED to save Andy Martin’s life.

“You go to the mall and something happens you might be the person walking by, and AEDs walk you through what to do so I just urge people to grab it and it will tell you what you need to do,” Sanders said.

Source: WSPA

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Hockey goalie makes a different kind of save

Oliver Urrego sprang into action March 1 when an opposing player collapsed on the ice during an adult league hockey game at Twin Rinks Ice Pavilion in Buffalo Grove.

While the goaltender on Napholz’s team, Mike Tuntland, started CPR, Urrego, 33, took charge of the life-or-death situation. He told other players to get the automated external defibrillator (AED), which the rink installed years ago.

Urrego gave Napholz chest compressions, then used the AED to revive him. It was the first time he used an AED.

This was the second time in a year the Oliver Urrego used CPR to save a life. In 2017 he and his wife performed CPR on his father-in-law who went into cardiac arrest in the couples home.

Source: Daily Herald


American Heart Association introduces new mobile app


My Cardiac Coach
Heart attack is scary and confusing. Recovery shouldn’t be.

My Cardiac Coach app available on the Apple App Store or the Google Play is designed to be a personalized recovery toolkit on your smartphone.

• Trustworthy information from the experts at the American Heart Association

• Interactive lessons to help you learn what you need to know

• Progress-trackers for monitoring blood pressure and weight

• Tools for logging physical activity and managing medications

• Connections to other survivors through our Support Network

heart.org

 

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Wife saves her firefighter husbands life with CPR

Luke and Jessica Pichette (Photo courtesy of KHQ)
Luke and Jessica Pichette (Photo courtesy of KHQ)

Jessica Pichette and her husband Luke were getting ready for bed when the unthinkable happened.

Jessica did chest Jessica says her husband began making strange sounds, she thought he was having a stroke. “I started dialing 911 at that time, kind of rolled him of over and at that time he a big deep breathe and then he was gone, he was not breathing, his eyes were rolled back,” Pichette said.

Jessica did chest compressions for six minutes until sheriff’s deputies, firefighters and EMS arrived and took him to the hospital.

Jessica hopes that more people will learn the crucial skill of CPR.

Source: KHQ


Man saves wife’s life with CPR

APPLETON, WI (WBAY/CNN) – Andrea Benrud is alive and well thanks to her husband, Luke, and his knowledge of CPR.

Luke Benrud took a CPR class so he knew to call 9-1-1 and then started CPR until EMS arrived.

“I just remembered chest compressions are most important and you would have to do them harder than you would think you’d have to do them. Especially when it’s your wife, you don’t want to hurt her,” Benrud explained.

“Seeing somebody else giving her CPR and then somebody else hooking her up to the defibrillator, shocking her, that’s when it all starts to hit me, the gravity of the situation,” he recalled.

The Joplin Globe


Firefighter knows the value of an AED firsthand

Les Morgan knows because his life was saved by the quick response of those around him Feb. 18. The 60-year-old firefighter with Schuylkill Hose Company No. 2 and borough resident responded to smoke in a structure and was handing his son, who is also a firefighter, a fire extinguisher when suddenly he was on the floor not breathing normally.

Les Morgan was suffering a cardiac arrest

EMS, firefighters and Schuylkill Haven Police Department officers all had a hand in saving Les Morgan. Kyle Morgan didn’t know everyone who helped save his father’s life, but trusted they knew what to do while he waited outside.

“He was down for less than two minutes,” Morgan said.

Within that time, 90 seconds of CPR was given and Morgan was shocked with the AED, which reads your heart rhythm and determines if a shock is needed. It then gives procedural instructions.

“A lot of people are afraid they are going to hurt someone,” by using the AED, Kyle Morgan said.

Every minute CPR is not given, the survival rate drops by 10 percent, according to the AHA.

About 70 percent of sudden cardiac arrests occur at home, while the remainder occur in public settings and nursing homes, according to the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety CPR/First Aid/AED Specialist

Click Here to learn more about AED/CPR/First Aid training

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Source: Standard-Speaker


Tech companies are targeting heart disease

          

From apps that diagnose irregular heart rhythms to phone cases that claim to measure blood pressure, there has been a wave of technology promising to use our everyday devices — smartphones and wearables — to fight heart disease. But why heart health, and how much can these gadgets really do?

Heart disease is the most common cause of death in the world.

Heart disease is the most common cause of death around the world, according to the World Health Organization, so of course companies want to work on a problem that could have a huge impact, and bring in lots of money. Apple, for example, has launched a study to identify irregular heart rhythms with its Apple Watch. Plus, many sensors and wearables lend themselves particularly well to helping with cardiovascular problems, says Greg Marcus, a cardiologist at the University of California, San Francisco.

Tech companies will play a large role in advancing early detection for serious illness. Everything from Irregular heart beats, high blood pressure, to diabetes

Source: Angela Chen and Alessandra Potenza on the The Verge

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Is your soap clean?

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.

Refillable Bulk Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat

Refillable bulk soap is messy and labor intensive, and has been proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

Contact your UniFirst First Aid + Safety representative today for a free consultation.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.