How Hit Songs Are Helping Save Lives, One Beat At a time.

In an effort to help train first responders in hands-only CPR, New York Presbyterian Hospital has released a 40-song playlist whose beats per minute match the number of chest compressions.

Most people are familiar with The Bee Gees’ 1977 hit – and aptly named – Stayin’ Alive which took the number one spot.

Artists from Beyoncé to Justin Timberlake to ABBA also had songs on the set list.

Bee Gees
Bee Gees

On a 40-track playlist released by New York Presbyterian Hospital, Stayin’ Alive by the Bee Gees came out as the best song to perform CPR to.

TOP 10 SONGS FOR SAVING LIVES

  1. Stayin’ Alive – Bee Gees
  2. Cecilia – Simon and Garfunkel
  3. Hard to Handle – The Black Crowes
  4. Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  5. Rock Your Body – Justin Timberlake
  6. I Will Survive – Gloria Gaynor
  7. MMMBop – Hanson
  8. Gives You Hell – The All-American Rejects
  9. Heartbreaker – Mariah Carey ft Jay Z
  10. Another One Bites the Dust – Queen

Stayin’ Alive, the disco hit made popular by the movie Saturday Night Fever, has a rhythm of 103 beats per minute.

This is close to the recommended rate of at least 100 chest compressions per 60 seconds that should be delivered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Additionally, doctors say, the song is well known enough to be useful in teaching the general public to effectively perform the lifesaving maneuver.

The 40-song list, which has a duration rate of two hours and 28 minutes of CPR jams, also includes songs like ABBA’s Dancing Queen and Beyoncé’s Crazy in Love.

Pop fans can enjoy tracks from Missy Elliot and Justin Timberlake, while alt-rock aficionados can choose from Fall Out Boy or the All-American Rejects.

Despite the number of times CPR ‘saves’ someone’s life on TV, it has an abysmal success rate in real life.

Only about eight percent of CPR patients are saved by the procedure, even when backup help is called immediately.

Those who’ve had to be saved with CPR are likely to experience other painful injuries, as well, such as crushed or ruptured organs.

However, performing CPR more than doubles the survival rate of patients who go into cardiac arrest.

 

Click Here to learn about CPR and CPR Certification

Click Here to learn about AED’s and Defibrillators

Chat Now – Click the “Live Chat”

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


The 10 second race – A simple explanation for eye wash station compliance

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention states that each day about 2,000 U.S. workers have a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. Chemical burns to one or both eyes are common.

Many of these injuries can result in blindness. Proper safety equipment, such as eye protection and eyewash stations can save a worker’s eyesight.

OSHA on Compliance

The General Requirements in section 29 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) 1910.151 states “…where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.”

American National Standards Institute

(ANSI) Standard Z358.1-2014 sets universal minimum performance and use requirements for all eyewash stations and drench shower equipment.

ANSI standard Z358.1-2014 says an eyewash station must:

  • Be accessible within a 10-second walk from the hazard
  • Be accessible without the need to walk up or down stairs, ladders, or cross any obstacles or roadways etc.
  • Deliver a 15-minute continuous flow of tepid fluid at 0.4 gallons per minute and be 60-100°F
  • Be located in areas where caustic or hazardous substances are present
  • Activate in one second or less and with one single motion
  • Be unobstructed
  • Be highly visible and identified with a sign

Where to place your emergency eyewash station

According to ANSI standards, the following areas must meet emergency eyewash compliance guidelines:

  • Painting and solvent operations
  • Battery charging stations
  • Tool parts washers
  • Laboratories
  • Hazardous chemical storage
  • Chemical pumping and/or mixing areas
  • Anywhere you use a chemical that has SDS eyewash requirements

Call Now to learn about our all-inclusive Eye Wash Inspection Program

Click here to visit our store

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us

 


Hand Safety & OSHA Requirements, What You Need To Know

 

Hand injuries, including injury to fingernails and fingers, are often written off as first-aid usage and near-misses. Many workers consider the use of gloves hard to comply with and unnecessary. Yet, more varieties of gloves for broader purposes exist than ever before – cut-resistant, chemical protective, electrically-rated, infection control, just to name a few. Carefully identifying the need, then selecting a glove with the appropriate performance parameters can prevent many injuries.

Back in the ‘old days’ People considered it a sign of toughness not to wear gloves. Most never considered wearing gloves to keep a better grip on tools, prevent knuckle busters and burns, or just keep my hands clean. In my teens and twenties, I would have been laughed at for wearing gloves. Now watching shows like Orange County Chopper, Monster Garage, and Pimp My Ride you see these master mechanics wearing gloves.

Gloves can make your job easier and safer. Choosing the correct glove for the job is a critical decision in preventing injuries while maintaining a grip on the situation. Identify the hazard and then evaluate the required characteristics for a glove. Hazards can range from heat, flames, sparks, sharp object electrical energy, and chemicals.

  1. Identify the hazards that could injure hands in this week’s discussion.
  2. List the characteristics required in each case and check your inventory to see if you have the proper gloves.

Gloves are considered PPE and are the last line of defense in preventing injuries. Wear them every time. Remember that prevention is the key to a workplace where Nobody Gets Hurt.

OSHA 1910.138(a)

General requirements. Employers shall select and require employees to use appropriate hand protection when employees’ hands are exposed to hazards such as those from skin absorption of harmful substances; severe cuts or lacerations; severe abrasions; punctures; chemical burns; thermal burns; and harmful temperature extremes.

OSHA 1910.138(b)

Selection. Employers shall base the selection of the appropriate hand protection on an evaluation of the performance characteristics of the hand protection relative to the task(s) to be performed, conditions present, duration of use, and the hazards and potential hazards identified.

 

Call for a free consultation

Click here to shop now

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


4 Fireworks Safety Tips To Keep You and Your Family Safe This 4th of July

Be safe this 4th of July holiday and prevent accidents from fireworks.

 

1 – Leave Fireworks to the Professionals

  1. The best way to protect your family is to not use any fireworks at home. Instead, attend public fireworks displays and leave the lighting to the professionals.
  2. If you plan to use fireworks, make sure they are legal in your area.

2 – Be Extra Careful With Sparklers

  1. Little arms are too short to hold sparklers, which can heat up to 1,200 degrees. How about this? Let your young children use glow sticks instead. They can be just as fun but they don’t burn at a temperature hot enough to melt glass.
  2. Closely supervise children around fireworks at all times.

3 – Take Necessary Precautions

  1. Do not wear loose clothing while using fireworks.
  2. Never light fireworks indoors or near dry grass.
  3. Point fireworks away from homes, and keep away from brush, leaves and flammable substances

4 – Be Prepared for an Accident or Injury

  1. Stand several feet away from lit fireworks. If a device does not go off, do not stand over it to investigate it. Put it out with water and dispose of it.
  2. Always have a bucket of water and/or a fire extinguisher nearby. Know how to operate the fire extinguisher properly.
  3. If a child is injured by fireworks, immediately go to a doctor or hospital. If an eye injury occurs, don’t allow your child to touch or rub it, as this may cause even more damage.

From your friends at UniFirst First Aid + Safety First Aid & Safety, we wish you a happy and safe 4th of July!

 

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us

 

Source; https://www.safekids.org/tip/fireworks-safety-tips

 


Is Apple Watch a Life Saver?

William Monzidelis says he is thankful to being alive today and that he owes it all to his Apple smart watch.

William was working at their family business, Bowlerland Lanes in Eastchester, a month ago when he passed blood in the bathroom. He says his latest model Apple Watch started going off almost instantly.

Doctors says that had William not gotten medical treatment as quickly as he did, he most certainly would have died.

“I was getting notifications from my watch telling me that I needed to seek medical attention immediately, my heart rate is going too high and too low, numbers that I’ve never had in my life,” William said.

Williams Mother Nancy recalls:

“I looked at his lips, they’re always pink like lipstick. ‘Your lips are white and blue, what’s going on?’. He said, ‘maybe I bled too much, my lips are never white and blue’,” Nancy said.

She got him in the car and drove to the hospital.

“When we got off the exit he started seizing, shaking his head, started projectile vomiting blood out of his mouth, his nose, wherever, then he passed out,” Nancy said. “His eyes rolled back and he was out.”

The Apple Watch is the most popular smart watch on the market today.

“I owe my life to that company, literally owe my life,” he said. “If I didn’t see that I would have gone back to my office, probably passed out, and that would have been it.”

William is still recovering from his ordeal. After two blood transfusions and an emergency endoscopy to cauterize the ulcer.

Source: CBS New York


8 Tips For Safer Driving This 4th of July

NSC Urges Drivers to Take Control of Their Safety This July 4th

National Safety Council calculations indicate 164 people may be killed on the road during the upcoming Fourth of July holiday period, and an additional 18,600 may be seriously injured in crashes.

The one-day holiday period this year will begin at 6 p.m. ET Tuesday, July 3, and will end at 11:59 p.m. ET Wednesday, July 4.

“By sharing these estimates, the National Safety Council hopes to highlight the importance of being a safe, sober and attentive driver so that everyone can safely celebrate this July 4 holiday,” said Deborah A.P. Hersman, president and CEO of the National Safety Council. “Independence Day should be about spending time with loved ones and watching fireworks, not about dealing with the tragic aftermath of a car crash.”

Unintentional, preventable injuries – commonly known as “accidents” – claimed a record high 161,374 lives in 2016 to become the third leading cause of death in the United States for the first time in recorded history. In fact, 2016 marked a 14 percent increase in roadway deaths since 2014 – the largest two-year jump in 53 years.  

 

Drivers can take measures to protect themselves. 8 Tips to ensure a safer holiday weekend include:

    1. Practicing defensive driving. Buckle up, designate a sober driver or arrange alternative transportation, get plenty of sleep to avoid fatigue, and drive attentively, avoiding distractions. Visit nsc.org for defensive driving tips.

    2. Recognizing the dangers of drugged driving, including impairment from prescription opioids. Visit StopEverydayKillers.org to understand the impact of the nation’s opioid crisis.

    3. Staying engaged in teens’ driving habits. Visit DriveitHOME.org for resources.

    4. Learning about your vehicle’s safety systems and how to use them. Visit MyCarDoesWhat.org for information.

    5. Fixing recalls immediately. Visit ChecktoProtect.org to ensure your vehicle does not have an open recall.

    6. Asking lawmakers and state leaders to protect travelers on state roadways. Read the State of Safety report to find out which states have the strongest and weakest traffic safety laws.

    7. Joining the Road to Zero coalition to understand how safety professionals are addressing motor vehicle fatalities. Visit nsc.org/roadtozero to get involved.

   8. Looking before you lock a vehicle to ensure no child is left behind in the back seat. At least 18 kids have died in hot cars this year.

 

Call Now to speak with a UniFirst First Aid + Safety Workplace Safety Specialist

Click Here for Workplace Safety Training Courses

Click Here for webChat

If you liked this post be sure to follow us:

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us

 

 

Source: National Safety Council


Think Electric Hand Dryers are Clean? This Might Change Your Mind…

 

Using paper towels to dry your hands is far more hygienic than using electric hand dryers. Using hand dryers actually increases the amount of bacteria on hands and can spread cross contamination in public washrooms, according to an independent scientific study. The study, conducted by scientists at the University of Westminster, London, measured the number of bacteria on subjects’ hands before washing and after drying them using three different methods —paper towels, a traditional warm air dyer and a new high-speed jet air dryer.

From a hygiene standpoint, paper towels are clearly superior to electric hand dryers, according to Keith Redway, a Senior Academic in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Westminster.

Study results show that drying with paper towels results in a significant decrease in the numbers of bacteria on the hands — a clear advantage compared with the increases observed for both types of electric hand dryers tested in this study — and are far less likely to contaminate other washroom users and the washroom environment.

“Indeed, these findings suggest that if either a warm air dryer or jet air dryer is the only drying method available, in terms of bacterial numbers, a washroom user could be better off not washing and drying their hands at all,” Redway says.

The Study found that paper towel drying reduced the average number of bacteria on the finger pads by up to 76 percent and on the palms by up to 77 percent. By comparison, electric hand dryers actually caused bacteria counts to increase. The study showed:

Traditional warm air dryers increased the average number of bacteria by 194 percent on the finger pads and by 254 percent on the palms.

Jet air dryers increased the average number of bacteria on the finger pads by 42 percent and on the palms by 15 percent.

The scientists also carried out tests to establish whether there was the potential for cross contamination of other washroom users and the washroom environment as a result of each type of drying method. They found:

• The jet air dryer, which blows air out of the unit at claimed speeds of 400 mph, was capable of blowing micro-organisms from the hands and the unit and potentially contaminating other washroom users and the washroom environment up to 2 meters away.

• Use of a traditional warm air hand dryer spread micro-organisms up to 0.25 meters from the dryer.

• Paper towels showed no significant spread of micro-organisms.

“The results of all parts of this study suggest that the use of warm air dryers and jet air dryers should be carefully considered in locations where hygiene is of paramount importance, such as hospitals, clinics, schools, nurseries, care homes, kitchens and other food preparation areas,” said Redway. “In addition, paper hand towel use is highly beneficial for improved hygiene in any other facilities open to the public, such as factories, offices, bars and restaurants.”

While consumers, healthcare institutions and businesses such as restaurants are often told that electric hand dryers are the most hygienic way to dry the hands after washing them, science says otherwise. A growing body of research, including this study by the University of Westminster and other studies as far back as 1989, suggest people could even be putting themselves at increased risk of illness by using electric hand dryers.

Content UniFirst First Aid + Safety today for help with your restroom supply needs.

 

Call Now to learn more

Click here to visit our bathroom supply shop

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us

 


How can your hands possibly have 25% more germs after washing?…

Many soap dispensers in public places are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.

Washing with contaminated hand soap increase the concentrations on people’s hands and on the surfaces they touch.  Refillable Bulk Hand Soap Puts the Health of Washroom Users and the Image of Building Owners at Risk.

A recent study has shown that hands can have as much as 25 times more germs after washing with refillable bulk soap than before washing.

Refillable bulk soap is the kind of washroom hand soap that’s typically poured from a gallon jug into an open dispenser reservoir. Find out how this soap can put your health at risk, then take action to help stop the threat

Refillable bulk hand soap is messy and labor intensive, and has been proven susceptible to bacterial contamination that can lead to a range of health issues. The refillable bulk soap risk was highlighted as part of a CNN report on The 8 Germiest Places at the Mall, on November 26, 2011.

The Risk

  • The germs identified in bulks soap have led to infections and fatalities in immunocompromised individuals
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),1 Health Canada,2 and the World Health Organization (WHO)3 have all recognized the bacterial contamination risk of “topping off” refillable bulk soap dispensers, and have issued guidelines against the practice.

The Image

In addition to the health risk posed to tenants and washroom users, refillable bulk soap can negatively affect the image of buildings and washrooms. The pouring of soup into multiple dispensers is slow and can leave a soapy mess. The extended labor time and product waste translate to cost issues, impacting customers’ bottom lines.

The Safe, Smart and Sustainable Alternative

Building owners and facility managers have an alternative that addresses the problems associated with refillable bulk soaps. GOJO SANITARY SEALED™ Refills are factory sealed to help lock out germs. It’s the sealed soap system that’s better for people, the planet and the bottom line of customers.

Read the original article and study here.

Contact your UniFirst First Aid + Safety representative today for a free consultation.

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings: Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. October 25, 2002 / Vol. 51 / No. RR-16. Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/Guidelines.html on May 18, 2010. Hand Sanitizer.
  2. Health Canada Guidance Document for Human-Use Antiseptic Drugs. December 2009. pg 32.
  3. World Health Organization (2009) WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization Press.

 

Call Now to learn more

Click here to visit our bathroom supply (Including Hand Sanitizer)

 

 

 

 

 


Think You Know What Heat Exhaustion Is?

 

Heat exhaustion is a condition whose symptoms may include heavy sweating and a rapid pulse, a result of your body overheating. It’s one of three heat-related syndromes, with heat cramps being the mildest and heatstroke being the most severe.

Causes of heat exhaustion include exposure to high temperatures, particularly when combined with high humidity, and strenuous physical activity. Without prompt treatment, heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke, a life-threatening condition. Fortunately, heat exhaustion is preventable.

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion may develop suddenly or over time, especially with prolonged periods of exercise. Possible heat exhaustion signs and symptoms include:

  • Cool, moist skin with goosebumps when in the heat
  • Heavy sweating
  • Faintness
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Weak, rapid pulse
  • Low blood pressure upon standing
  • Muscle cramps
  • Nausea
  • Headache

When to see a doctor

If you think you’re experiencing heat exhaustion:

  • Stop all activity and rest
  • Move to a cooler place
  • Drink cool water or sports drinks like Sqwincher or Gatorade

Contact your doctor if your signs or symptoms worsen or if they don’t improve within one hour. If you are with someone showing signs of heat exhaustion, seek immediate medical attention if he or she becomes confused or agitated, loses consciousness, or is unable to drink. You will need immediate cooling and urgent medical attention if your core body temperature (measured by a rectal thermometer) reaches 104 F (40 C) or higher.

Causes

Your body’s heat combined with environmental heat results in what’s called your core temperature — your body’s internal temperature. Your body needs to regulate the heat gain (and, in cold weather, heat loss) from the environment to maintain a core temperature that’s normal, approximately 98.6 F (37 C).

Your body’s failure to cool itself

In hot weather, your body cools itself mainly by sweating. The evaporation of your sweat regulates your body temperature. However, when you exercise strenuously or otherwise overexert in hot, humid weather, your body is less able to cool itself efficiently.

As a result, your body may develop heat cramps, the mildest form of heat-related illness. Signs and symptoms of heat cramps usually include heavy sweating, fatigue, thirst and muscle cramps. Prompt treatment usually prevents heat cramps from progressing to heat exhaustion.

You usually can treat heat cramps by drinking fluids or sports drinks containing electrolytes (Gatorade, Powerade, others), getting into cooler temperatures, such as an air-conditioned or shaded place, and resting.

Other causes

Besides hot weather and strenuous activity, other causes of heat exhaustion include:

  • Dehydration, which reduces your body’s ability to sweat and maintain a normal temperature
  • Alcohol use, which can affect your body’s ability to regulate your temperature
  • Overdressing, particularly in clothes that don’t allow sweat to evaporate easily

Risk factors

Anyone can develop heat exhaustion, but certain factors increase your sensitivity to heat. They include:

  • Young age or old age. Infants and children younger than 4 and adults older than 65 are at higher risk of heat exhaustion. The body’s ability to regulate its temperature isn’t fully developed in the young and may be reduced by illness, medications or other factors in older adults.
  • Certain drugs. Medications that affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated and respond appropriately to heat include some used to treat high blood pressure and heart problems (beta blockers, diuretics), reduce allergy symptoms (antihistamines), calm you (tranquilizers), or reduce psychiatric symptoms such as delusions (antipsychotics). Additionally, some illegal drugs, such as cocaine and amphetamines, can increase your core temperature.
  • Obesity. Carrying excess weight can affect your body’s ability to regulate its temperature and cause your body to retain more heat.
  • Sudden temperature changes. If you’re not used to the heat, you’re more susceptible to heat-related illnesses, such as heat exhaustion. Traveling to a warm climate from a cold one or living in an area that has experienced an early heat wave can put you at risk of a heat-related illness because your body hasn’t had a chance to get used to the higher temperatures.
  • A high heat index. The heat index is a single temperature value that considers how both the outdoor temperature and humidity make you feel. When the humidity is high, your sweat can’t evaporate as easily and your body has more difficulty cooling itself, making you prone to heat exhaustion and heatstroke. When the heat index is 91 F (33 C) or higher, you should take precautions to keep cool.

Complications

Untreated, heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke, a life-threatening condition that occurs when your core body temperature reaches 104 F (40 C) or higher. Heatstroke requires immediate medical attention to prevent permanent damage to your brain and other vital organs that can result in death.

Prevention

You can take a number of precautions to prevent heat exhaustion and other heat-related illnesses. When temperatures climb, remember to:

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight clothing. Wearing excess clothing or clothing that fits tightly won’t allow your body to cool properly.
  • Protect against sunburn. Sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool itself, so protect yourself outdoors with a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses and use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Apply sunscreen generously, and reapply every two hours — or more often if you’re swimming or sweating.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Staying hydrated will help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature.
  • Take extra precautions with certain medications. Be on the lookout for heat-related problems if you take medications that can affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat.
  • Never leave anyone in a parked car. This is a common cause of heat-related deaths in children. When parked in the sun, the temperature in your car can rise 20 degrees Fahrenheit (more than 6.7 C) in 10 minutes.It’s not safe to leave a person in a parked car in warm or hot weather, even if the windows are cracked or the car is in shade. When your car is parked, keep it locked to prevent a child from getting inside.
  • Take it easy during the hottest parts of the day. If you can’t avoid strenuous activity in hot weather, drink fluids and rest frequently in a cool spot. Try to schedule exercise or physical labor for cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or evening.
  • Get acclimated. Limit time spent working or exercising in heat until you’re conditioned to it. People who are not used to hot weather are especially susceptible to heat-related illness. It can take several weeks for your body to adjust to hot weather.
  • Be cautious if you’re at increased risk. If you take medications or have a condition that increases your risk of heat-related problems, such as a history of previous heat illness, avoid the heat and act quickly if you notice symptoms of overheating. If you participate in a strenuous sporting event or activity in hot weather, make sure there are medical services available in case of a heat emergency.

 

Call Now to see how our line of seasonal products can help you beat the heat!

Click Here to learn more about UniFirst First Aid + Safetys online “Heat Stress” safety course

Shop Now

 

linkedinFollow us    facebooklike us


3 Reasons Everyone Should Learn CPR

* 900 Americans die every day from Sudden Cardiac Arrest

* 95% of victims die before reaching a hospital

* 4 minutes – Brain death starts to occur within 4 minutes

(The average response time of EMS is 8 minutes)

CPR/First Aid – Corporate and Group Classes

UniFirst First Aid + Safety offers weekly CPR classes for companies and groups, UniFirst First Aid + Safety’s CPR, AED, and First Aid training program will help employers meet OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.

This 2-year certification course conforms to the latest AHA Guidelines Update for CPR and ECC, and the latest AHA and ARC Guidelines Update for First Aid.

Click Here For more information on CPR

Click Here For more information on AED’s